Why You might want to Skip Botox treatment During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding

 

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Botox is generally considered safe for cosmetic and other purposes. But pregnancy might make you hesitate to keep your next appointment. It may be better to err on the side of caution and delay. Doctors aren’t sure if Botox, a prescription medication made from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, can be transferred through breast milk to your baby. The toxins produced by the bacterium.

It appears that the use of Botox injections during breastfeeding is unlikely to cause any harm to the baby. 1  Even though the toxins are not likely to pass to the baby through the breast milk, it may be best to breastfeed before the Botox injection and then wait a few hours after receiving it before breastfeeding again. The reason is because no one is sure and no drug company wants to run a trial to determine its safety. Understandably, testing pregnant or breastfeeding patients to see if Botox is safe is not a drug trial anyone wants to run.

Doctors aren’t sure if Botox, a prescription medication made from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, can be transferred through breast milk to your baby. If it does transfer to breast milk, there is no research on the amount of time it takes for Botox to metabolize out of breast milk (meaning pumping and dumping NOT recommended.). There aren`t studies yet made on the safety of Botox procedures while breastfeeding. However, here`s what experts know: It seems that Botox injections while breastfeeding are unlikely to cause any danger to the baby, although there aren`t enough studies made on this matter. There`s a little amount of the toxin present in every Botox injection.

Again, because of the lack of formula studies on Botox and breast milk, there’s no definite answer. Meaning, professionals are yet to know if Botox can pass into breast milk. And even if you’re considering pumping and dumping to make sure there is no toxins in the milk, you might want to think again.

Most places wont do it if you are breastfeeding because of liability issues but it is actually perfectly safe. The botox molecule is too large to get into breastmilk. There is even a report of a woman who got sick with botulism from food and when they tested her milk it was fine (and thats wayyyy higher amount than would be in cosmetic botox).

While some physicians are comfortable treating women who are pregnant, trying to become pregnant, or breast feeding, in the absence of data I err on the side of caution and recommend that my patients avoid Botox and other such cosmetic treatments until they are not longer breast feeding.After a Botox treatment, I recommend that my patients avoid heat. Sharman L. Reed, MD, an OB/GYN at Kaiser Permanente, says that there are fewer things to avoid when breastfeeding than when pregnant. “While you’re pregnant, you’re sharing a.

List of related literature:

factors, that prenatal exposure to corticosteroids adds a 6-fold increase in the risk for cleft lip with or without cleft palate, IUGR, and shortening of the head and mandible.

“Drugs for Pregnant and Lactating Women E-Book” by Carl P. Weiner, Catalin Buhimschi
from Drugs for Pregnant and Lactating Women E-Book
by Carl P. Weiner, Catalin Buhimschi
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

As a Category C drug, Botox is not recommended for pregnant or breast-feeding women.

“Textbook of Aging Skin” by Miranda A. Farage, Kenneth W. Miller, Howard I. Maibach
from Textbook of Aging Skin
by Miranda A. Farage, Kenneth W. Miller, Howard I. Maibach
Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009

Contraindications and Precautions The drug should be avoided by women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and by patients who may be allergic to human albumin, a protein in Botox preparations.

“Lehne’s Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice Nurses and Physician Assistants E-Book” by Laura Rosenthal, Jacqueline Burchum
from Lehne’s Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice Nurses and Physician Assistants E-Book
by Laura Rosenthal, Jacqueline Burchum
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Botox should not be used in a patient who is pregnant or lactating.

“Plastic Surgery Secrets Plus E-Book” by Jeffrey Weinzweig
from Plastic Surgery Secrets Plus E-Book
by Jeffrey Weinzweig
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Botox is contraindicated in pregnant and nursing patients and those with neuromuscular disease.

“Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care E-Book” by Grant C. Fowler
from Pfenninger and Fowler’s Procedures for Primary Care E-Book
by Grant C. Fowler
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

increased risk of cleft palate, hypospadias and body anomalies if given during pregnancy, therefore only used if benefits outweigh risks.

“Havard's Nursing Guide to Drugs Mobile optimised site” by Adriana P. Tiziani
from Havard’s Nursing Guide to Drugs Mobile optimised site
by Adriana P. Tiziani
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Botox is classified as an agent for which safety during pregnancy has not been established.

“Therapy of Skin Diseases: A Worldwide Perspective on Therapeutic Approaches and Their Molecular Basis” by Thomas Krieg, David R. Bickers, Yoshiki Miyachi
from Therapy of Skin Diseases: A Worldwide Perspective on Therapeutic Approaches and Their Molecular Basis
by Thomas Krieg, David R. Bickers, Yoshiki Miyachi
Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010

Although the reason for the increase during pregnancy is unknown, one theory suggests that estrogen-induced edema causes pressure on the facial nerve, making the pregnant woman more vulnerable to the condition.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

The consensus panel concluded that giving a single course of corticosteroids to pregnant women at risk for preterm delivery reduces the risk of death, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and intraventricular hemorrhage in their preterm infants.

“Intrapartum Management Modules: A Perinatal Education Program” by Betsy B. Kennedy, Donna Jean Ruth, Elizabeth Jean Martin
from Intrapartum Management Modules: A Perinatal Education Program
by Betsy B. Kennedy, Donna Jean Ruth, Elizabeth Jean Martin
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Effects of sucking and skin-to-skin contact on maternal ACTH and cortisol levels during the second day postpartum: influence of epidural analgesia and oxytocin in the perinatal period.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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5 comments

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  • So informative, appreciate you sharing your knowledge! Please could you do a video on adult acne and treatments (including accutane)?

  • Hi, my name is Sonya, i have just found your YouTube channel and im very interested in your knowledge of skincare, i have always tried to take care of my skin, i have used many different skincare lines and always trying knew things, i have normal to oily skin with very oily during hot weather i am very pale skin burn easy some red in my skin some large pores in some areas my eyes are my big concern i have dark circles and very puffy, im very interested in using some of the skincare that you use, i watched your video on your night time products you used, very impressed with the ingredients that was in them, i Google the zo skincare, could you help me on what to start with for skincare for me.

  • Dr. Prassad Is it could use filler during fifth week in pregnancy? Before got pregnant I have had fillers because my acné scars. Thanks in advance

  • I’m not pregnant or nursing but I have a question about the Alastin nectar you use at night. I was going to purchase the Alastin nectar along with the Alastin retinol can I mix those
    2 together like you do with the nectar and refissa? And do you recommend Alastin retinol? Is it a good product
    For the $$? And for the nectar I seen that it is mainly used after a procedure..I haven’t had any procedures done lately but is it still good to use on your skin? Thanks!!

  • I wear sunscreen every day winter and summer, but I’m unsure about the brand I’m using. Do you know any good sunscreen products or ingredients to look out for? ��