Why Labor Will work for Babies

 

“Signs of Labor” How To Know When It’s Time: by PregnancyChat.com

Video taken from the channel: PregnancyChat


 

What happens if you go over dates or are overdue (VBAC)

Video taken from the channel: University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust


 

How to Engage Baby for Birth

Video taken from the channel: Pearently


 

The Importance of a 39-Week Delivery | EveryParentPBC.org

Video taken from the channel: Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County


 

Normal Labor | Beaumont Labor and Birth

Video taken from the channel: Beaumont Health


 

Countdown to Baby: 5 Signs of Labor

Video taken from the channel: WebMD


 

Induced Labor | Beaumont Labor and Birth

Video taken from the channel: Beaumont Health


Labor induction — also known as inducing labor — is the stimulation of uterine contractions during pregnancy before labor begins on its own to achieve a vaginal birth. Your health care provider might recommend inducing labor for various reasons, primarily when there’s concern for a mother’s health or a baby’s health. The first stage of labor and birth occurs when you begin to feel regular contractions, which cause the cervix to open (dilate) and soften, shorten and thin (effacement). This allows the baby to. The Best and Worst Reasons to Induce Labor.

Although few true reasons to induce labor exist, labor induction is rapidly becoming routine procedure despite mounting research evidence that inductions are twice as likely to end in cesarean section and put the baby at twice the risk of experiencing fetal distress. when the baby is having distress and needs help getting out fast. when there is tearing of the tissues upward into sensitive areas such as the urethra and clitoris. if after pushing for a long. The first, the latent phase, is the longest and least intense. During this phase, contractions become more frequent, helping your cervix to dilate so your baby can pass through the birth canal.

cuts the risk of lung disease in half and reduces a premature baby’s risk of dying by up to 40 percent. All babies born at less than 28 weeks had lung problems, but the problems were milder for. Babies born via cesarean birth are more likely to pick up bacteria that is on skin.

3. Lower rate of respiratory issues. Passing through the birth canal in a natural birth also helps shape the head and expel amniotic fluid from the lungs which lower baby’s risk for respiratory problems like asthma. 4. If your baby is “following the curve” of the growth chart, she’s paralleling one of the percentile lines on the chart, and the odds are good that her caloric intake is fine, no matter how.

Back labor by itself cannot harm the baby or the mother. However, research shows that a baby in an undesirable position in the womb (the most common cause of back labor) is more likely to experience difficulty descending through the birth canal leading to. Most babies maximize their cramped quarters by settling in head down, in what’s known as a cephalic or vertex presentation. But if your baby is breech, it means he’s poised to come out buttocks or feet first. When labor begins at 37 weeks or later, nearly 97 percent of babies are set to come out headfirst.

Most of the rest are breech.

List of related literature:

Because each day a baby remains in the womb improves the chances of both survival and good health, holding off labour as long as possible will be the primary goal.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

The physical natural functions behind what is happening in labor are not generally discussed.

“HypnoBirthing, Fourth Edition: The Natural Approach to Safer, Easier, More Comfortable Birthing The Mongan Method, 4th Edition” by Marie Mongan
from HypnoBirthing, Fourth Edition: The Natural Approach to Safer, Easier, More Comfortable Birthing The Mongan Method, 4th Edition
by Marie Mongan
Health Communications, Incorporated, 2015

Speaking of labor, there were many times that women accompanying us gave birth to babies and, as soon as they were born, the mothers would bring them to us for our touch and blessing.

“Cabeza de Vaca's Adventures in the Unknown Interior of America” by Cyclone Covey, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Cyclone Covey, William T. Pilkington
from Cabeza de Vaca’s Adventures in the Unknown Interior of America
by Cyclone Covey, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, et. al.
University of New Mexico Press, 1983

You can tell them that labor is uncomfortable, but that their mother’s body is made for giving birth.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

You can tell them that labor is uncomfortable, but that their mother’s body is made for

“Maternal Child Nursing Care” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier, 2013

Yet it is the baby who initiates labor, and the mother whose body must relax into the process.

“Mother Daughter Wisdom” by Christiane Northrup, M.D.
from Mother Daughter Wisdom
by Christiane Northrup, M.D.
Hay House, 2006

There are many myths and beliefs regarding labor pain.

“Childbirth Across Cultures: Ideas and Practices of Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Postpartum” by Pamela Kendall Stone, Helaine Selin
from Childbirth Across Cultures: Ideas and Practices of Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Postpartum
by Pamela Kendall Stone, Helaine Selin
Springer Netherlands, 2009

Labor is a complex, multifaceted interaction between the mother and fetus.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Most women also experienced practices that may do more harm than good, such as not eating or drinking anything during labor and lying on their backs during labor and while giving birth.

“Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth” by Boston Women's Health Book Collective, Judy Norsigian
from Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth
by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, Judy Norsigian
Atria Books, 2008

Although the process of labor and birth is valuable con

“Perinatal Nursing” by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
from Perinatal Nursing
by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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5 comments

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  • I have high amniotic fluid of 25cm at 38 weeks and my EDD is 22nd September.
    In my case how to make baby engage into pelvis.
    Is normal delivery possible for me?

    Pls reply ��

  • I’ve been in pain for almost 48 hours and I’m only 28 weeks. I don’t know what to do. Trying to hang in there until my doc appointment tomorrow but it’s too uncomfortable

  • Hi I’m in my 39th week now and my due date has been given on sep6th.. but still my baby head is not engaged yet.. is it possible to get it fixed??

  • Nesting is true. I’m lazy af and barely even do chores while I was pregnant. 5 days before delivery I had this sudden urge to clean the whole house and even do the laundry which was really weird and unusual. Days after, I had bloody discharge then strong contractions.

  • am always doing nesting..
    then latenight i have my discharge (1st out is pink discharge,then lately i have brownies discharge).. then its always hurt my tummy at lower back nd my abdomen