When In The Event You Start Prenatal Vitamins Sooner Than You Believe

 

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When should I start taking a prenatal vitamin?

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If you’re thinking seriously about becoming pregnant in the next few months, starting a prenatal vitamin should be at the top of your preconception to-do list. If you’re already pregnant, begin. The 3 Month Rule. If you’re not sure when to start taking prenatal vitamins, three months ahead of conception is a good rule of thumb.

That’s because so much of your baby’s development happens during the first few weeks of pregnancy—when you might not even realize you’re pregnant yet!“Ideally, women should start taking prenatal vitamins prior to conception,” says Michels. “It’s important for a woman to consider starting a prenatal prior to getting pregnant to ensure they have adequate nutrient levels at the time of conception.”. That is because new research suggests that the earlier you start taking one, the better.

In fact, according to the Mayo Clinic, it is advisable to start taking prenatal vitamins even before conception. Their recommendation goes so far as to suggest prenatal vitamins should be taken by any woman who is of child-bearing age. If you’re wondering when to start prenatal vitamins, you might be surprised. The ideal time to start a prenatal supplement is actually 3 months prior to conception.

Here’s why you should start taking prenatals before pregnancy: Your eggs develop 90 days before they are released, and healthy eggs are key to a healthy pregnancy. Take a prenatal vitamin every day as soon as you realize you’re pregnant. Because folic acid is so important in the earliest weeks of your pregnancy, ideally you would start taking prenatal vitamins before you conceive – that’s why many doctors recommend. Start taking folic acid at least 1 month before you start trying to get pregnant. The first few weeks of pregnancy are a really important time for fetal health and development.

Taking folic acid and other prenatal vitamins can help reduce the risk of some birth defects. Keep taking prenatal vitamins throughout your entire pregnancy. Ideally, you’ll start taking prenatal vitamins before conception. In fact, it’s generally a good idea for women of reproductive age to regularly take a prenatal vitamin.

The baby’s neural tube, which becomes the brain and spinal cord, develops during the first month of pregnancy — perhaps before you even know that you’re pregnant. This is why doctors recommend that any woman who could get pregnant take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid daily, starting before conception and continuing for the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. If. It’s not too late!!

Yes most prenatals contain folic acid that help prevent some birth defects (specifically spinal I believe), and it is most effective if you are actually taking the prenatals a few months BEFORE you even get pregnant, but you and your baby will both still benefit if you start taking them now.

List of related literature:

Since neural tube forms during the initial 3–6 weeks of pregnancy, folic acid intake should be started 3 months prior to planned pregnancy and should continue for the 1st trimester (i.e. 3 months after conception).

“Fundamentals of Orthopedics” by Mukul Mohindra, Jitesh Kumar Jain
from Fundamentals of Orthopedics
by Mukul Mohindra, Jitesh Kumar Jain
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2017

The neural tube closes before the sixth week of pregnancy, so sufficient folate is recommended during the first trimester, as well as three months prior to conception.

“Culinary Nutrition: The Science and Practice of Healthy Cooking” by Jacqueline B. Marcus
from Culinary Nutrition: The Science and Practice of Healthy Cooking
by Jacqueline B. Marcus
Elsevier Science, 2013

The risk is reduced when you start taking a daily multivitamin containing folic acid three months before you conceive and continue to do so during at least the first month of pregnancy.

“The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything In Between” by Ann Douglas
from The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything In Between
by Ann Douglas
Wiley, 2011

With regard to women who have had a previous NTD-affected pregnancy, the CDC and a number of professional organizations recommend taking 4,000 mcg of folic acid starting at least 1 month before conception and continuing throughout the first 3 months of pregnancy to reduce the risk for recurrence [13, 16].

“Handbook of Nutrition and Pregnancy” by Carol J. Lammi-Keefe, E.A. Reese, Sarah C. Couch, Elliot Philipson
from Handbook of Nutrition and Pregnancy
by Carol J. Lammi-Keefe, E.A. Reese, et. al.
Humana Press, 2008

Ideally, prenatal care should begin as early in the pregnancy as possible, with visits to a health care provider every 4 weeks during the first 28 weeks of pregnancy, every 2 to 3 weeks for the next 8 weeks, and weekly thereafter until delivery.

“Encyclopedia of Gender and Society” by Jodi O'Brien
from Encyclopedia of Gender and Society
by Jodi O’Brien
SAGE Publications, 2009

Taking a multivitamin Supplement regularly for three months before conception and during the first trimester of pregnancy also may reduce a mother’s risk of developing a complication known as preeclampsia.”

“Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth” by Boston Women's Health Book Collective, Judy Norsigian
from Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth
by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, Judy Norsigian
Atria Books, 2008

• Folic acid should be initiated before conception and maintained at least through the 1st 4 weeks of fetal development, as neural tube formation is nearly complete by the time of the 1st missed period and pregnancy test.

“The 5-minute Obstetrics and Gynecology Consult” by Paula J. Adams Hillard, Paula Adams Hillard
from The 5-minute Obstetrics and Gynecology Consult
by Paula J. Adams Hillard, Paula Adams Hillard
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Women with a history of delivering a child with a neural tube defect should take 4 mg/day of folic acid from at least 4 weeks before the conception through the first 3 months of pregnancy.

“Clinical Pediatric Neurology: A Signs and Symptoms Approach” by Gerald M. Fenichel
from Clinical Pediatric Neurology: A Signs and Symptoms Approach
by Gerald M. Fenichel
Saunders/Elsevier, 2009

For all these reasons, it is important to start taking a good-quality prenatal vitamin early—ideally at least three months before trying to conceive.

“It Starts with the Egg: How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF (Second Edition)” by Rebecca Fett
from It Starts with the Egg: How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF (Second Edition)
by Rebecca Fett
Franklin Fox Publishing LLC, 2019

Supplementation should begin at least 1 month before conception and continue through the first 3 months of pregnancy; women should take a daily vitamin supplement containing at least 400 mcg of folic acid.

“Prometric MCQs In General Medicine”
from Prometric MCQs In General Medicine
by
nasim,

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Aaaaw….this moved me to tears. Seeing you so wanting the pregnancy test to be positive. Going through all those months taking tests and all that. I’m so happy for you. Your baby is very lucky to have a mom like you. A mom that tried so hard to love her/him to life. A moms love…..the greatest love on earth. It’s so beautiful!! Congrats!:)