Understanding Weight problems While Pregnant

 

Medical Monday Obesity and Pregnancy

Video taken from the channel: Gundersen Health System


 

Stress Obesity and Pregnancy: Panel

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


 

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Video taken from the channel: Chennai Women’s Clinic & Scan Centre


 

Women w/ Obesity: Pre-Pregnancy Wt, Gestational Wt Gain, Impacts on Maternal/Child Health (Webinar)

Video taken from the channel: NASEM Health and Medicine Division


 

Obesity & Pregnancy | Obesity

Video taken from the channel: Howcast


 

High BMI and Pregnancy Weight Gain with Alan Peaceman, MD

Video taken from the channel: NUFeinbergMed


 

Kaiser Permanente Study Encourages Obese Women to Gain No Weight During Pregnancy

Video taken from the channel: Kaiser Permanente Thrive


Obesity is an increasing issue with more and more women beginning pregnancy already in the overweight or obese categories. About forty percent of women are in the overweight category and fifteen percent are considered obese according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Overweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between twenty-five and twenty-nine point nine. Start by considering these guidelines for pregnancy weight gain and obesity: Single pregnancy.

If you have a BMI of 30 or higher and are carrying one baby, the recommended weight gain is 11 to 20 Multiple pregnancy. If you have a BMI of 30 or higher and are carrying twins or multiples. The management of obesity requires long-term approaches ranging from population-based public health and economic initiatives to individual nutritional, behavioral, or surgical interventions. Therefore, an understanding of the management of obesity during pregnancy is essential, and management should begin before conception and continue through the postpartum period.

Pregnancy and weight are something that is often talked about, though most of the discussions tend to center around gaining weight while you are pregnant. Another issue to discuss is what happens to a woman and her pregnancy when she starts pregnancy in the overweight or obese categories. The truth is this is a multifaceted issue, not just medical or weight related.How Obesity. Obesity may make it harder for you to get pregnant.

You may also have trouble getting pregnant if you choose to have in vitro fertility treatments to get pregnant. Once you get pregnant, your risk of having health problems during pregnancy is higher if you are obese. Your baby would also have an increased risk of certain health problems. 15 rows · May 01, 2018 · Interventions to Reduce Obesity in Pregnancy Weight loss before.

Obese women have a greater risk of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes. Their babies also have a higher risk of premature birth. the mother’s blood sugar levels during pregnancy, specifically, whether she develops pregnancy-related (gestational) diabetes. It makes intuitive sense that the mother’s diet during pregnancy should also affect fetal development and birth weight.

Therefore, an understanding of the management of obesity during pregnancy is essential, and management should begin before conception and continue through the postpartum period. Although the care of the obese woman during pregnancy. In the United States, obesity during pregnancy is common and it increases obstetrical risks.

In collaboration with Kaiser Permanente Northwest, CDC conducted a study to assess associations.

List of related literature:

At the beginning and end of pregnancy, the mother should try to maintain a normal body weight, because the mother’s weight gain itself is a risk factor for the onset of child obesity.

“Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention” by Debasis Bagchi
from Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention
by Debasis Bagchi
Elsevier Science, 2010

Entering pregnancy with excessive amounts of body fat stores also increases the risk for metabolic complications during pregnancy such as glucose intolerance or preeclampsia [46].

“Handbook of Nutrition and Pregnancy” by Carol J. Lammi-Keefe, E.A. Reese, Sarah C. Couch, Elliot Philipson
from Handbook of Nutrition and Pregnancy
by Carol J. Lammi-Keefe, E.A. Reese, et. al.
Humana Press, 2008

Maternal obesity increases the risk of pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm delivery and caesarean section (Krishnamoorthy et al 2006; Sarwer et al 2006).

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Energy requirements during the pregnancy are highest in the middle (from 10 to 30 weeks) when maternal fat stores are being assimilated.

“Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book” by Jane Coad, Melvyn Dunstall
from Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book
by Jane Coad, Melvyn Dunstall
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

To assess the nutritional needs and status of the pregnant woman, her pattern of weight gain, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), daily activities, and dietary intake should be evaluated throughout the pregnancy.

“Manual of High Risk Pregnancy and Delivery E-Book” by Elizabeth S. Gilbert
from Manual of High Risk Pregnancy and Delivery E-Book
by Elizabeth S. Gilbert
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

The following are not recommended: calorie restriction in overweight women during pregnancy, weight maintenance in obese women during pregnancy, antihypertensive therapy specifically to prevent pre-eclampsia, and vitamins C and E (14, 15).

“Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, Stergios Doumouchtsis, Lynette Denny
from Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2019

Obesity during pregnancy increases the risk of hypertension, preeclampsia, neural tube defects, and need for caesarean section.

“Clinical Handbook of Schizophrenia” by Kim T. Mueser, Dilip V. Jeste
from Clinical Handbook of Schizophrenia
by Kim T. Mueser, Dilip V. Jeste
Guilford Publications, 2008

Therefore all pregnant women, including those that are overweight or obese, should have a preconception visit to their obstetrical care provider to assess health status; evaluate physical, emotional, and nutritional readiness for pregnancy; and allow for modification of potential risk factors and behaviors (CDC, 2006).

“AWHONN's Perinatal Nursing” by Kathleen R. Simpson
from AWHONN’s Perinatal Nursing
by Kathleen R. Simpson
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2013

At that time, a common practice was to restrict weight gain during pregnancy with the aim of preventing toxemia, difficult births and maternal obesity.

“Handbook of Anthropometry: Physical Measures of Human Form in Health and Disease” by Victor R. Preedy
from Handbook of Anthropometry: Physical Measures of Human Form in Health and Disease
by Victor R. Preedy
Springer New York, 2012

Obese pregnant women should be counseled on the risks associated with maternal obesity, and excessive weight gain during pregnancy is discussed at each prenatal visit (ACOG, 2013c).

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • Hi there, I want to know if Custokebon Secrets, will really work for me? I see lots of people keep on talking about this popular lose weight secrets.

  • Thank you for this great interview. I am pregnant with baby #3 with a bmi of 30. I’ve been watching calories and carbs, and eating whole foods so far. I’m also walking a lot. I was beginning to run pre pregnancy, but have switched to long distance walking. So far have unintentionally lost a little weight this 1st trimester. Hoping to keep weight gain very low for this baby.

  • What pisses me off is that these “doctors” NEVER mention that you could be of “normal” weight and still have fertility issues. They save it for us fat folks. So annoying����