The Physical Characteristics of the Baby

 

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Physical characteristics of newborns || Newborn || New Baby ||2020

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Video 1 Appearance of the newborn

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Normal Characteristics of Newborns

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A Head-to-Toe Guide on Your Newborn’s Physical Features Head. If you gave birth vaginally, your baby’s head may be elongated or misshapen. The two soft spots on your Hair. Some babies are born bald; others arrive with a full head of hair.

The texture and color may be equally surprising. Hiccups Sneezing Yawning Spitting up Straining with bowel movements when stool is soft Chin or lip quivering Passing gas Jitteriness of arms and legs when crying Startling to noises with brief body stiffening (called the Moro reflex) Mild congestion of the nostrils (very common in a dry climate!). Darker-skinned babies are usually born with brown eyes, which tend to stay brown or turn another dark color, such as a deep green. Skin: Underlying blood vessels show through the new delicate skin, giving it a pinkish or reddish tone. Here is a summary of some of the physical characteristics and newborn behavior that your baby may have.

Each of them are normal findings. Take a minute to examine your baby, looking for some of these characteristics. Soft spot: The anterior fontanel, a diamond-shaped soft area at the top of the skull. No matter what the cause, puffiness, too, is temporary — lasting just a few days.

In the meantime, don’t worry that it might interfere with your baby’s ability to see you. Though she can’t yet distinguish one person from another, a newborn can make out blurry faces at birth — even through those swollen lids. Bent ear. CHARACTERISTICS.

OF A. NEWBORN. SKIN At birth, the skin of a normal infant is purplish-red in color, then within minutes, the skin pinks up. Blueness of the hands and feet is frequently seen during the early hours of life.

Jaundice. More than half of newborns have some degree of jaundice in the first week of life. Newborns have many variations in normal appearance, from color to the shape of the head. Some of these differences are just temporary, part of the physical adjustments a baby goes through.

Others, such as birthmarks, may be permanent. Understanding the normal appearance of newborns can help you know that your baby is healthy. Normal Newborn Behaviors and Activities. Click on the links below to learn more about these topics. Newborn Reflexes.

Newborn Sleep Patterns. Newborn Senses. Your Newborn’s Appearance. Skin Conditions. Peeling or cracking skin around the wrists or ankles is common, especially in babies who have gone past their due date.

Acrocyanosis. Sneezing. Eyes.

Your newborn may have swelling around the eyes. This will disappear a few days after birth. Some babies. The abdomen is round and sticks out slightly.

Take little breaths and have short pauses between. Newborn’s Chest. The breasts of boy and girl babies may look enlarged after birth.

The hormones that cross the placenta during the last two weeks before birth cause the breasts to fill with milk.

List of related literature:

Characteristics of skin, general attitude (or posture) when supine, appearance of hair, and amount of subcutaneous fat provide cues to a newborn’s physical development.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Physical Characteristics An infant’s physical development happens so rapidly that size, shape, and skills seem to change daily (see Chapter 28 for discussion of the newborn).

“Foundations of Nursing E-Book” by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
from Foundations of Nursing E-Book
by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

These infants, often called postterm infants, display the characteristics of infants who are 1 to 3 weeks of age, such as absence of lanugo, little if any vernix caseosa, abundant scalp hair, and long fingernails.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong, Annette Baker, R.N., Patrick Barrera, Debbie Fraser Askin
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, et. al.
Mosby/Elsevier, 2013

Physical characteristics of affected infants are presence of body hair, reddish skin color, and absence of skin folds.

“Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals” by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
from Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals
by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
Wiley, 2007

In the extremely premature infant (23 to 28 weeks’ gestation) the skin can be translucent with little subcutaneous fat and superficial veins that are easily visualized.

“Klaus and Fanaroff's Care of the High-Risk Neonate E-Book” by Jonathan M Fanaroff, Avroy A. Fanaroff
from Klaus and Fanaroff’s Care of the High-Risk Neonate E-Book
by Jonathan M Fanaroff, Avroy A. Fanaroff
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

development: from zygote to fetus, the baby grows to about 2.5 inches long, facial features/arms/legs/fingers/ toes/organs/external genitals begin to form.

“Mosby's Essential Sciences for Therapeutic Massage E-Book: Anatomy, Physiology, Biomechanics, and Pathology” by Sandy Fritz, Luke Fritz
from Mosby’s Essential Sciences for Therapeutic Massage E-Book: Anatomy, Physiology, Biomechanics, and Pathology
by Sandy Fritz, Luke Fritz
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Normal physical characteristics include the continued presence of lanugo on the skin of the back; cyanosis of the hands and feet for the first 24 hours; and a soft, protuberant abdomen.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Newborn skin is relatively transparent and smooth looking and is soft and velvety to touch.

“Maternal, Fetal, & Neonatal Physiology4: Maternal, Fetal, & Neonatal Physiology” by Susan Tucker Blackburn
from Maternal, Fetal, & Neonatal Physiology4: Maternal, Fetal, & Neonatal Physiology
by Susan Tucker Blackburn
Elsevier Saunders, 2012

The newborn appearance is characterized by a covering comprising a layer of fluid called vernix caseosa; a large, bumpy head; a flat nose; reddish skin; puffy eyes; external breasts; and fine hair called lanugo covering the body (CaseSmith, 2015).

“Pediatric Skills for Occupational Therapy Assistants E-Book” by Jean W. Solomon, Jane Clifford O'Brien
from Pediatric Skills for Occupational Therapy Assistants E-Book
by Jean W. Solomon, Jane Clifford O’Brien
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The premature baby’s skin is translucent, leaving veins and arteries visible.

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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