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Surviving the Summer Heat in Pregnancy Hydration. Drinking water during pregnancy is very important because of the increased demands on your body. Signs of Dehydration. Drink at least two liters of clear liquids, preferably water, a day.

If you are outside you need Swelling. Swelling in. Beating the summer heat is tough for all of us but it is difficult, and in some cases dangerous, for pregnant women.

Pregnancy causes a woman’s body temperature to run slightly higher than normal, so the Texas heat is sure to make her feel extra uncomfortable. Overheating can lead to miscarriage during the first trimester. While we can’t will the weather cooler to make you more comfortable, we can offer these seven expert tips for surviving the summer heat while pregnant. Stay hydrated: When you are pregnant, the Institute of Medicine recommends that you drink 12-13 eight ounce glasses of water per day.

However, when you are exposed to heat or exercise, you should have an additional 8-ounce glass per hour. How to survive the summer heat during pregnancy. Pregnology; in Pregnancy; 0 217 08/22/2019 Summer pregnancies are not the most comfortable. You already feel like a bloated elephant and then there are the high temperatures, a clammy sky and sun.

Really hot. When you’re pregnant in the summer, you might feel like you’ll never survive these warm weather months before the baby arrives, but there’s no reason to despair. Here are seven options for staying cool and comfortable during a summer pregnancy.

Stay Hydrated. Water. Pregnant women who feel they are overheating should take the same steps other people should: move to a cooler place, sip water, loosen clothing, apply wet cloths to the skin and sit in cool bathtub water.

Stay ultra-hydrated to avoid heat stroke, she says. “Water is OK, but Gatorade and PowerAde with electrolytes are far better because they help replace salt and retain fluid,” she says. Knowing the. Keep your feet elevated. Everyone swells a little more when it’s hot outside. But when you’re pregnant, (especially in the later months of pregnancy) that summer heat can make you swell more.

Be sure to elevate your feet whenever you can, (including when you’re at work) to decrease swelling. Your summer pregnancy simply means you have a built-in excuse to put your feet up. Keep your feet elevated as often as possible to prevent swelling – drinking lots of water will also help.

Save Errands for Cooler Times of Day. “Pregnant women already have some degree of heat intolerance,” says Nardone, who advises moms-to-be to pay attention to the heat warnings. If the heat index (meaning how hot the temperature feels.

List of related literature:

• Use large electric pads or blankets, large chemical heat pads, or warm water bottles.

“Advanced First Aid, CPR, and AED” by Alton L. Thygerson, Steven M. Thygerson, Howard K. Mell
from Advanced First Aid, CPR, and AED
by Alton L. Thygerson, Steven M. Thygerson, Howard K. Mell
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Maintain a comfortable maternal temperature with blankets or a fan.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

It’s common for pregnant women to feel warmer than usual anyway, but imagine carrying around 20 or 30 extra pounds in the middle of summer.

“The Mama Natural Week-by-Week Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth” by Genevieve Howland
from The Mama Natural Week-by-Week Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth
by Genevieve Howland
Gallery Books, 2017

Keep in mind that as the months pass, you’ll probably be keeping yourself so warm – thanks to a pregnancy-boosted metabolism – that you’ll be kicking off all your covers anyway.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Once overheated, your baby takes much longer than you to cool down.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Remember to cover the heating pads or bottles with a blanket or sheet.

“Concise Text Book for Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Assuma Beevi
from Concise Text Book for Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Assuma Beevi
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Dress your baby lightly to allow body heat to escape (no more than a nappy is needed in hot weather) and maintain room temperature at 20° to 21.1°C (68° to 70°F) (when necessary to keep the air cool, use an air conditioner or fan if you have one, but keep baby out of the path of the air flow).

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Overheating your body from exercise, a sauna, or a steam room early in pregnancy can affect the development of your unborn baby.

“American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, Revised and Updated 4th Edition” by Roberta Larson Duyff
from American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, Revised and Updated 4th Edition
by Roberta Larson Duyff
HMH Books, 2012

Your body’s thermostat is cranked up when you’re pregnant, so be sure to look for lightweight clothing made of cotton or other natural fibres.

“The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything in Between” by Ann Douglas
from The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything in Between
by Ann Douglas
Wiley, 2009

Beat the heat Your body’s thermostat is cranked up when you’re pregnant, so choose lightweight clothing made of cotton or other natural fibres.

“The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything In Between” by Ann Douglas
from The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything In Between
by Ann Douglas
Wiley, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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