Stillbirth Risk in Past due Pregnancies

 

Complications in Late Pregnancy Part 02

Video taken from the channel: Learning in 10


 

Sleep On Your Side Still Birth Prevention Campaign

Video taken from the channel: The Cafe


 

How to reduce the risk of stillbirth: sleeping on your side

Video taken from the channel: Scottish Government


 

Can a Stillbirth Be Prevented?

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Linda Burke


 

The Risk of Fetal Death

Video taken from the channel: Learning in 10


 

Risk Of Still-Birth Increases With Every Week Past 37 Weeks, Study Finds

Video taken from the channel: CBS Philly


 

RISK: Consequences of a Near-Term Birth

Video taken from the channel: Dartmouth-Hitchcock


For several reasons, an overdue pregnancy can be risky both for the mother and the baby. In addition to higher odds of certain complications, there’s said to be an increased risk of stillbirth in pregnancies that have progressed beyond 42 weeks. But exactly how much increased risk is there? Stillbirth Risk Beyond 42 Weeks.

Complications include a higher risk of stillbirth and difficulties in delivering large babies. However, a minority of women, dubbed “the 10-month mamas”, believe a baby will come in its own time. Yes, you can have a successful pregnancy after a stillbirth.

While you’re at a higher risk for complications than someone who hasn’t had a stillbirth, the chances of a second stillbirth are only. But we need to have a conversation about the increased risk of stillbirth for some groups of women whose pregnancies are overdue – women over 35, women who are very overweight and women who smoke,” he says, explaining that maternal age, overweight and smoking can all adversely affect the quality of the placenta. How late can you safely have a baby? As per doctors, risks increase with age and therefore risk of pregnancy problems in older women is high. Technically, a woman can conceive any time before.

The stillbirth rate among twin pregnancies is approximately 2.5 times higher than that of singletons (14.07 versus 5.65 per 1,000 live births and stillbirths) 1. The risk of stillbirth increases in all twins with advancing gestational age, and it is significantly greater in monochorionic as compared with dichorionic twins 12. Another risk factor is not smoking during the three months before pregnancy occurs, they found. Stillbirth, defined as fetal death at 20 weeks into the pregnancy or later, affects one in 160 U.S. Unfortunately, between 10 and 15 percent of known pregnancies end in miscarriage. You may have heard of couples waiting to announce a pregnancy until the risk of having a miscarriage is lower. The.

Between weeks 13 and 20, the risk of experiencing a miscarriage is less than 1 percent. By week 20, a miscarriage is known as a stillbirth and may still cause a woman to go into labor. Stillbirth.

A triple risk model for unexplained late stillbirth. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 14: 142. Weiss, E., Krombholz, K., et al. (2014). Fetal mortality at and beyond term in singleton pregnancies in Baden-Wuerttemberg/Germany 2004-2009.

Arch Gynecol Obstet 289(1): 79-84. Wennerholm, U. B., Hagberg, H., et al. (2009). Induction of labor versus expectant.

List of related literature:

In women with one previous caesarean delivery, the risk of unexplained antepartum stillbirth at or after 39 weeks gestation is about double the risk of stillbirth or neonatal death from intrapartum uterine rupture.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Women over 40 years old have a similar stillbirth risk at 39 weeks as women who are between 25 and 29 years old at 41 weeks, and once they pass 40 weeks’ gestation their risk of stillbirth exceeds that of all women less than 40 years old at term (12).

“Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, Stergios Doumouchtsis, Lynette Denny
from Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2019

The risk of stillbirth is increased between 37 and 41 weeks’ gestation.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, Jay D. Iams, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Lesley Frazier
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Stillbirth risk in a second pregnancy.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Joshua Copel, Robert M Silver
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

However, maternal deaths due to other complications such as pregnancy-induced hypertension, placenta previa, retained placenta, and thromboembolism, are considered by some as difficult to prevent [17,18].

“Critical Care Obstetrics” by Michael A. Belfort, George R. Saade, Michael R. Foley, Jeffrey P. Phelan, Gary A. Dildy
from Critical Care Obstetrics
by Michael A. Belfort, George R. Saade, et. al.
Wiley, 2010

When considering the outcomes related to post-term pregnancy, we see the association with antepartum stillbirth regardless of how the effect is measured, but when the appropriate denominator of ongoing pregnancies is used, we see the risk of antepartum stillbirth begin to increase earlier at 39 and 40 weeks’ gestation.

“Dewhurst's Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
from Dewhurst’s Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
Wiley, 2012

Risk of stillbirth after 37 weeks in

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

There is, however, a risk of injuries unique to the pregnant patient, such as uterine rupture and placental abruption—both of which may lead to the death of the foetus (see later).

“Essential Surgery E-Book: Problems, Diagnosis and Management: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by Clive R. G. Quick, Suzanne Biers, Tan Arulampalam, Philip J. Deakin
from Essential Surgery E-Book: Problems, Diagnosis and Management: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by Clive R. G. Quick, Suzanne Biers, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The risk of increta is 10% to 25% in women with one previous cesarean section when the placenta is implanted over the scar and exceeds 50% in women with placenta previa and multiple cesarean deliveries (Table 55-2).

“Textbook of Diagnostic Sonography E-Book: 2-Volume Set” by Sandra L. Hagen-Ansert
from Textbook of Diagnostic Sonography E-Book: 2-Volume Set
by Sandra L. Hagen-Ansert
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Population-based estimate of sibling risk for preterm birth, preterm premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption and pre-eclampsia.

“Bleeding During Pregnancy: A Comprehensive Guide” by Eyal K. Sheiner
from Bleeding During Pregnancy: A Comprehensive Guide
by Eyal K. Sheiner
Springer New York, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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38 comments

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  • Im 36 weeks im getting induced right now to have my first son. I really wish i can wait but my atomic fluid is too low�� I’m so nervous i pray for a safe delivery, i been having complications. Please keep my baby kaiden in prayers!❤����

  • I had my daughter at 36. 4 weeks. I went into preterm at 31 weeks. I was given steroids so she was 7 lbs 7 oz. I wanted my second to come earlier. I made it to 39. 4 weeks. He was 6 lbs 14 oz. if I would had tried to rush him I’m sure he wouldn’t have been as healthy and strong. Glad I waited..

  • The woman who vacuumed her house did NOT induce her labor. Vacuuming does NOT induce labor. If it did women wouldnt need medical inductions. We would just all vacuum once full term ��
    This is sooooooo medically inaccurate. I’m 36 weeks along with my second and i still work out (my ob is well aware and has zero issues with my routine). I lift 75 pounds at minimum twice a week, i walk up and down stairs to do laundry, i sweep, mop my whole house daily. I went into labor on my due date with my last one. I was a nicu baby. My mom had my twin sister and i at 32 weeks. We were just jaundiced and very small back in the 90’s. Jaundice is normal. Even full term babies can be jaundiced. Modern medicine is more than capable of handling these issues. Whoever told this mom vaccuming is why her child was struggling is a MONSTER.

  • My doctor wont induced until 41 weeks. Thats what i did with my two pregnancies and now most likely with my third!!! No excuse to induce for your own confort��������

  • Thank you for posting this. My brother & I were born at 28 weeks, & we both suffer from extreme anxiety and autistic qualities, & I have other mental health issues that might not have been triggered otherwise. I only recently learned that being in the NICU is considered “severe infant trauma”; for 21 years I’ve suffered from symptoms of trauma-panic attacks, dissociation, OCD, self-harm, an eating disorder-with NO IDEA why. You rarely ever hear about the repercussions of being a preemie-

  • I can’t believe some mothers would *choose* to have their babies born premature!?! I never knew anyone did that until watching this…

  • I am being induced Monday. Now if I had a choice I’d go the full 40 weeks. My baby has been measuring small. So they have to take her. But it is very selfish to have a baby early when you have a perfectly good pregnancy.

  • Docters nowerday only want money they earn in cecerian and don’t care for weeks or time just play with mothers life and child life as well

  • This video is terrible. They found the worst examples of self inducing labor, but this is 7 years old. I thought these women did something like strip their own membrane or drunk something to induce or raise your bp on purpose to get a csection.People do way more serious stuff to induce,other than vacuum.

  • The fact that you listened to your own instincts and sent mom to hospt. Seems so simple but with a lot attitudes of we want as little and or no intervention as possible. The horror stories where people are told to just trust their bodies is insane. Thank you for being a doctor who goes the extra mile.

  • I am 40 weeks.i have an appointement with 3 different person soon… and she told me they can induce me in 2 weeks… I will
    Share my experience after all. I cant sleep

  • Judge me or not, Placenta starts degenerating from around week 38. One could keep their baby as long as 43 weeks sure. I am having my C section (elective) at week 39 day 2, with or without ANYONE judging. Yes, its about baby but its about mother too. Its been psychological hard road for me and I do not “ENJOY” pregnancy. Having my child delivered at week 39 day 2 (elective) wont make me less of a mother. I am proud mom of 2 beautiful daughters, one 2 years and another will be here in 8-9 days VIA ELECTIVE C SECTION. Having choose not to deliver did not make me less of a mother and having this baby at week 39 wont make me selfish. Its not selfish but no one thinks about mothers well being. I think its respect of choice but yes I wont think about delivering electively at early term

  • In the sad part of YouTube yet again. My deepest condolences to all bechilded(I came up with the term) parents of such infants. God rest each and every one of their pure and undefiled souls in heaven.

  • My daughter is 18, has type one diabetes & 35 wks pregnant, shes been in hospital for the last week with high blood pressure swelling & high bgls, they have given a date for next week to deliver her at 36 wks. After watching this I will be having a meeting with the doctors to see if they can push it up to at least 37 wks, she & baby have been doing well in hospital, except for the swelling on my girls feet & hands

  • I wish you were my doctor for this pregnancy, its my third one after two loses. One miscarriage and stillbirth.. I went in to the doctor because my baby kept hiccuping and she said it was normal, but i told her the hiccups were there for about two days straight almost non stop, she sent me home, not even a week later the baby moved very violently and the next morning i was feeling very slow in and out movements when i put my hand on my belly. I went in to the hospital and there was no heart beat..my baby had the umbilical wrapped tightly around his neck when i delivered him…I wish my midwife would’ve listened to my concerns..now im almost sure that my baby’s oxygen was being cut off and the continuous hiccups were a sign that could’ve saved his life and my heartbreak..

  • Watching this at 38 weeks pregnant is breaking my heart but also gives me a lot of insight of how important it is for me to trust God when to bring baby Ezekiel into this world.
    I will continue to go through these horrible pregnancy symptoms with no more complaining if it means that my son will be healthy when he is born. All this uncomfortableness is worth it for the sake of my baby’s health.

  • I don’t understand why the presentation of this video had to be so horrific… every baby and pregnancy and mother and everything else around is different. Back in the day, many many babies were lost. No one can perfect child birth. I’m sorry mother had to go through this.. trust in the Lord and sometimes, you have to trust your doctors and NICU too.

  • Not Mother Nature but God is the Creator of everything! God Almighty is the Designer / Fashioner and He has power over all things.

  • How DARE the staff tell the muma not to touch her own baby coz it be to traumatising….GRRRRR….& yet they can touch him all day & night putting tubes & every thing in him, changing his nappy….GRRRR….the muma is the only one that should be changing that babys nappy & touching his little hands & feet & bonding with him….NO NURSE WOULD BE TELLING ME NOT TO TOUCH MY BABY AT ALL….GRRRR!!!!

  • At 37 weeks my water broke, I went into labor, labored 12 hours, baby seemed fine and there was a heartbeat, dr. came in eventually and did a forceps delivery, and the baby was born not alive. Umbilical cord 2x around neck but not tight, Dr. said. This seems atypical from most stillbirth stories I’ve heard where the baby dies and then you deliver. My question is with what happened for us is this still considered a stillbirth? Or do you call it something else???

  • I would have done ANYTHING to go full term with baby.. he was born early but not by choice. My lil guy qas born at 29weeks4days due to severe pre-eclampsia. He spent 55days in the NICU, we were by his side everyday abd yes it is traumatizing, it is hard and challenging, but my lil guy is worth every minute of it.

    37weeks is considered the low end of full term, elective C-Sections should not be done until after that date.

  • I delivered two hours before my due date after being induced for medical reasons. My son was small for full term, so I can’t imagine how little he would’ve been if he’d come sooner. I have no idea how long he would’ve stayed in there if I wasn’t induced. By the end of my pregnancy I was so swollen and uncomfortable, but enjoyed the experience overall. Even at full term, my son had problems with blood sugar and jaundice due to his birth weight. Doctors think I had preeclampsia due to my extreme swelling, high bp and restricted growth, so all those factors led to the induction.

    That lady shouldn’t feel guilty about vacuuming. If her body wasn’t ready to give birth, it wouldn’t go into labor without serious medical intervention (and even then it’ll resist).

    I’m now pregnant with #2 and initially thought I wouldn’t mind a 36 weeker like I was till my mom told me about all the problems I had being born that early. Those last few weeks are more important than we think. Just bc babies can survive at 24 weeks due to modern medicine doesn’t mean it’s ok and a nicu is an adequate replacement for a womb.

  • I had stillbirth at 30 weeks due to preeclampsia. Can u plz tell me how can I prevent precclampsia in my next pregnancy. I’m scared.Plz reply me.

  • I loved every single second of all 4 of my pregnancies and all of them were over due. I’d be pregnant for as long as nature would allow for other women who can’t….that’s how much I LOOOOVE being pregnant!

  • My doctor suggested a c section at 38.5 weeks because I had mild pre eclampsia so I went along with it. I had a c section planned for week 39 so he figured a few days wouldn’t matter and I agreed. I also had gestational diabetes and severe carpal tunnel syndrome. She was 19 inches, 6.4lbs and was totally healthy, no complications and we went home 3 days later. I was surprised how tiny she was since my first baby was over 8lbs at 39.5 weeks. I felt bad at first because her hands and feet were so wrinkled and I would have tried to wait another week had I known she was going to be small. But she was/is fine and is growing like a weed. I don’t have any feelings of guilt anymore. If I have another baby in the future though I won’t plan a c section unless I go past my due date. The whole reason I had one planned 2nd time around is because my first labor experience was negative. I went into labor at 39 weeks, had a very hard time, stalled with baby up too high at 10cm and needed/wanted a c section. I didnt want to risk going through that again but the 2nd one probably would have come easy since she was so much smaller than the first. I didnt know though. Doctor didn’t know she was small. We assumed she would be bigger due to my having GD.

    My sister was in an accident that caused trauma to her belly causing the placenta to tear off and bleed but it re attached itself on its own somehow. She was in the hospital a long time and doctors gave her meds to postpone labor for an extra week. She almost died from severe pre eclampsia and doctors preformed an emergency c section to save both her and the baby. Her boy was born about 2 months early @3lbs and was released home 1 month later. He is currently a happy, healthy, active 2 year old and very intelligent for his age, not developmentally delayed at all.

  • My son is happy and healthy and almost 26 years old.  He hardly moved at all during my entire pregnancy I remember feeling one hard kick in the ribs around 6 months, and beyond that, if he was moving, I didn’t feel it.

  • I told my midwife that I don’t feel my baby a lot these days only at night and when I am sitting and I felt him in waiting room but when she did this movement test I want clicking and when she took my blood pressure I felt a little movement and she said I felt him too… I wish she has done my ultrasound:( later That day my baby died Inside me

  • My brother and I both have scars from where the tape pulled off skin when IV’s and feeding tubes are removed. I had jaundice. My brother couldn’t breathe on his own, got an infection, and a hemmorage. I had to stay in the NICU for 2 months, and my brother for 3 months…

  • I don’t blame the mothers they don’t now what they don’t know the blame is squarely on the bloody doctors who ALOOW this to happen!!!

  • I’m getting induced early this week (37 weeks) due to oncoming preeclampsia and my liver turning toxic for the baby and this video is making me scared… BUT I was born at 36 weeks, no problem. My fiance was born at 34 weeks, no problem. My mom was born at 40 weeks and was a flight for life baby as she was sick so it’s hard to say…

  • 37 weeks… get out. I’m 25 weeks now and I’m OVER being pregnant. I’ve had an easy, beautiful first pregnancy. I hate being fat and uncomfortable. I hear what they’re saying but it’s a no for me.

  • I lost my daughter in October. I went to my normal weekly appointment and her cord pressure was abnormal, so they set me up for a follow up the coming Tuesday. I went to the ER down the street at 2am Saturday because she just didn’t feel right, she wasn’t moving as much as normal. The doctor there found her heart beat, told me to keep my ob appointment, and sent me home, said they get bigger and run out of room. I wish i would have known more at the time.

  • Its kind of scary because i had my baby at 33 weeks and he was only in the hospital for 4 days. Everything was good with him by then amd i was able to breastfeed him.

  • My heart is broken in so many pieces. My daughter lost her baby at 37 1/2 weeks and some of the things the doctors said to her just do not sound believeable. If a obstetric nurse sees this please answer questions for me. Thanks

  • I hate the thought of babies going through trauma and suffering like my brother and i did, and do, unnecessarily. Thank you so much for getting the word out there, and to others, please share this video!

  • Thanks for watching my video and so sorry for my delayed responses to some of you. I had some personal issues going on which are now resolved. I will be producing more videos on the future and thank you all for watching.

  • Their experience of pain is so heartbreaking and this pain of suffering these preterm issues make new mom feel so helpless sometime but I just pray for all the Lil angels may God heal these babies soon

  • my daughter has a friend that was pregnant with her second baby and when she was just a week from delivery she was suddenly not feeling much movement. She went to see her doctor who told her that was normal,but she still knew something wasn’t right and went back to the doctor. Her doctor kept doing tests and sending her back home for a few days.Finally after doing an ultrasound it showed no heart beat.The baby was still born.The umbilical cord was pinched