Stadol (Butorphanol) During Labor

 

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Butorphanol (Stadol)

Video taken from the channel: NURSINGcom


During labor, the goal is to relieve the pain without putting you at risk for harm or severe side effects. Studies show that butorphanol is a safe, low cost, and effective medication for pain relief during labor.   However, like all medications, side effects are possible. They can affect both you and your baby. Stadol is sometimes used during early labor, but using it just before childbirth can cause breathing problems in a newborn. Butorphanol can pass into breast milk and may cause drowsiness or breathing problems in a nursing baby.

Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Stadol: Stadol has been found to relieve pain when given in the first stage of labor. This narcotic is considered more potent than Demerol.

It is usually given intravenously in small doses, usually 1 to 2 mg. The advantages of using Stadol include: Starts working in less than five minutes; Is a sedative; Has minimal fetal effects; Causes minimal nausea. 2 mg IV before induction and/or 0.5-1 mg increments during anesthesia (higher dose may be required, up to 0.06 mg/kg, or 4 mg/70 kg) Total cumulative dose varies; typically ranges between 4-12.5 mg. Butorphanol (Stadol) is a synthetic opioid (narcotic) pain reliever prescribed to treat severe pain, preoperative or preanesthetic pain management, and manage pain during labor. Side effects, drug interactions, dosage, storage, and pregnancy safety information should be.

What are the Indications of Butorphanol (Stadol) Nursing Pharmacology Considerations? moderate to severe pain, labor pain, sedation. Use of butorphanol in geriatric patients, patients with renal impairment, patients with hepatic impairment, and during labor requires extra caution (see below and the appropriate sections in PRECAUTIONS). The usual recommended dose for initial nasal administration is 1 mg (1 spray in one nostril).

If adequate pain relief is not achieved within 60 to 90 minutes, an additional 1 mg dose may be. Drug Name Generic Name: butorphanol tartrate Brand Name: Stadol Classification: Opioid agonist-antagonist analgesic Pregnancy Category C (during pregnancy) Pregnancy Category D (during labor and delivery) Controlled Substance C-IV Dosage & Route Parenteral Moderate to severe pain Adult: 1-4 mg via IM injection or 0.5-2 mg IV injection every 3-4 hr. Anesthesia Adult: As premedicant before. Stadol is also used as part of anesthesia for surgery, or during early labor (if childbirth is expected to be more than 4 hours away).

The brand name Stadol is no longer manufactured and can only be found in generic form. Common side effects of Stadol (butorphanol) include: drowsiness, dizziness, constipation, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetit. Labor.

In patients at full term in early labor a 1–2 mg dose of STADOL Injection IV or IM may be administered and repeated after 4 hours. Alternative analgesia should be used for pain associated with delivery or if delivery is expected to occur within 4 hours.

List of related literature:

Butorphanol (Stadol), Nalbuphine (Nubain), and Fentanyl (Sublimaze) may all be given IM or as an IV bolus/IV push and are commonly given for pain relief during labor.

“Manual of Critical Care Nursing E-Book: Nursing Interventions and Collaborative Management” by Marianne Saunorus Baird, Susan Bethel
from Manual of Critical Care Nursing E-Book: Nursing Interventions and Collaborative Management
by Marianne Saunorus Baird, Susan Bethel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Butorphanol (Stadol) IM; 30 to 40 times more potent than meperidine; does not interfere with labor; less neonatal depression

“Mosby's Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN® Examination” by Judith S. Green, Mary Ann Hellmer Saul, Dolores F. Saxton, Patricia M. Nugent, Phyllis K. Pelikan
from Mosby’s Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN® Examination
by Judith S. Green, Mary Ann Hellmer Saul, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Cevik B, Colakoglu S, Ilham C, Orskiran A. Anesthetic management of cesarean delivery in pregnant women with a temporary pacemaker.

“Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book” by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, Lawrence C Tsen, Warwick D Ngan Kee, Yaakov Beilin, Jill Mhyre, Brian T. Bateman, Naveen Nathan
from Chestnut’s Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book
by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Butorphanol tartrate (Stadol) is prescribed for a woman in labor.

“Saunders Q & A Review Cards for the NCLEX-RN® Exam E-Book” by Linda Anne Silvestri, Angela Elizabeth Silvestri
from Saunders Q & A Review Cards for the NCLEX-RN® Exam E-Book
by Linda Anne Silvestri, Angela Elizabeth Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

One recommended protocol is premedication with glycopyrrolate (to counteract vagal stimulation from handling the gravid uterus), induction with propofol, and maintenance with inhalant agents such as isoflurane.17a A local anesthetic line block can be applied to the skin and subcutaneous tissues at the incision site.

“The Cat E-Book: Clinical Medicine and Management” by Susan Little
from The Cat E-Book: Clinical Medicine and Management
by Susan Little
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Narcotic analgesics such as butorphanol tartrate (Stadol) and nalbuphine hydrochloride (Nubain) are commonly used for pain relief in labor, with sedation being the primary mechanism of action.

“Core Curriculum for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing E-Book” by AWHONN, M. Terese Verklan, Marlene Walden, Sharron Forest
from Core Curriculum for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing E-Book
by AWHONN, M. Terese Verklan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The nurse is caring for a client in labor who has butorphanol tartrate (Stadol) prescribed for the relief of labor pain.

“Saunders Q&A Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book” by Linda Anne Silvestri
from Saunders Q&A Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book
by Linda Anne Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

It may be caused by fetal response to medication provided to the mother in labor such as meperidine (Demerol) or butorphanol (Stadol) or fetal anemia (Gabbe, 2017).

“Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Gloria Leifer
from Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Gloria Leifer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Some analgesics given during labor (such as nalbuphine [Nubain] or butorphanol [Stadol]) have the potential to interfere with the early development of breastfeeding behaviors, especially if given within 1 hour of birth (Jordan, Emery, Bradshaw, Watkins, & Friswell, 2005; Ransjo-Arvidson et al., 2001).

“AWHONN's Perinatal Nursing” by Kathleen R. Simpson
from AWHONN’s Perinatal Nursing
by Kathleen R. Simpson
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2013

Butorphanol (Stadol) is a synthetic partial opiate agonist analgesic.

“Infusion Nursing E-Book: An Evidence-Based Approach” by Infusion Nurses Society, Mary Alexander, Ann Corrigan, Lisa Gorski, Judy Hankins, Roxanne Perucca
from Infusion Nursing E-Book: An Evidence-Based Approach
by Infusion Nurses Society, Mary Alexander, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I’m almost nine weeks pregnant with my fourth child and found out last year my back is broken in two places. I’m terrified of the pain and possible damage that may take place throughout this pregnancy and the labor and delivery of my baby. I don’t meet with my OBGYN for another couple weeks and unsure of what my possible plan will be. Do you have any recommendation on how to manage pain and how to minimize further damage?