Reasons You may need a Biophysical Profile (BPP) While Pregnant

 

28 week BPP with 4D peeks! Biophysical profile #3

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What is a Bio Physical Profile (BPP)?

Video taken from the channel: Maternal Fetal Medicine Associates YouTube


 

Pregnancy Update: 27 weeks, BPP (biophysical profile)

Video taken from the channel: momwithsparklyheels


Here are some reasons that you may have a Biophysical Profile (BPP) ordered for your baby: 1  Your pregnancy has gone past your due date or past 40 weeks gestation You are carrying multiples (twins or more) You have had a previous pregnancy loss (stillbirth). Although many women have healthy pregnancies, it is crucial for doctors to keep an eye on the health of both baby and mother. For this reason, you. Multiple gestation (twins, triplets) Decreased amniotic fluid (oligohydramnios) Small baby (intrauterine growth restriction) Placental abnormality.

Previous unexplained fetal death. Here are some specific reasons you might have a biophysical profile: You have preexisting diabetes that’s treated with medication, gestational diabetes treated with medication, high blood pressure, or some other medical condition that could affect your pregnancy. You have gestational hypertension.

A biophysical profile is a test that is sometimes used during the third trimester of pregnancy. It is often done if there is a question about the baby’s health. This may be because of other test results or certain pregnancy symptoms, or because your pregnancy is high risk. The biophysical profile combines 2 tests to check your unborn baby’s overall health: a nonstress.

A biophysical profile (BPP) test measures the health of your baby (fetus) during pregnancy. A BPP test may include a nonstress test with electronic fetal heart monitoring and a fetal ultrasound. The BPP measures your baby’s heart rate, muscle tone, movement, breathing, and the amount of amniotic fluid around your baby. A biophysical profile is a test that’s sometimes given during your third trimester of pregnancy.

It is typically done if the health of your baby is in question because of the results of another test, because of certain pregnancy symptoms, or if your pregnancy is high risk. Your doctor may recommend a BPP test if you’re past your due date or have a higher risk of problems during pregnancy. You could be at higher risk because of. A biophysical profile (BPP) test measures the health of your baby (fetus) during pregnancy.

A BPP test may include a nonstress test with electronic fetal heart monitoring and a fetal ultrasound. The BPP measures your baby’s heart rate, muscle tone, movement, breathing, and the amount of amniotic fluid around your baby. Additionally, following are some other reasons for getting a biophysical profile test: You are a diabetic and on medication You are experiencing other medical conditions, which might affect your pregnancy.

You are experiencing gestational hypertension.

List of related literature:

Undetectable maternal serum unconjugated estriol levels in the second trimester: risk of perinatal complications associated with placental sulfatase deficiency.

“Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics E-Book” by Carl A. Burtis, Edward R. Ashwood, David E. Bruns
from Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics E-Book
by Carl A. Burtis, Edward R. Ashwood, David E. Bruns
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Key points to consider include family history of adrenal conditions, such as CAH or known DSD; aspects of the pregnancy, such as growth restriction and preeclampsia (IUGR and hypospadias); maternal acne or hair growth in pregnancy (aromatase deficiency); and any prenatal tests or scans performed.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, P. Reed Larsen, MD, FRCP, Henry M. Kronenberg, MD
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology
by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Gestational history General health and nutrition; maternal infections; exposure to medication, drug and alcohol use, toxins, radiation; chronic medical conditions; history of pre-eclampsia, abnormal intrauterine growth, or foetal movements.

“Oxford Handbook of Psychiatry” by David Semple, Roger Smyth, Jonathan Burns, Rajan Darjee, Andrew McIntosh
from Oxford Handbook of Psychiatry
by David Semple, Roger Smyth, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2005

Low or absent unconjugated estriol in pregnancy: an indicator for steroid sulfatase deficiency detectable by fluorescence in situ hybridization and biochemical analysis.

“The Immunoassay Handbook: Theory and Applications of Ligand Binding, ELISA and Related Techniques” by David Wild
from The Immunoassay Handbook: Theory and Applications of Ligand Binding, ELISA and Related Techniques
by David Wild
Elsevier Science, 2013

A high-risk obstetric service, when available, should care for SLE patients to monitor the progress of the pregnancy, including fetal heart rhythm.27

“Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice” by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, Joanne Sandberg-Cook, JoAnn Trybulski
from Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice
by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Antenatal surveillance aims to detect deviations from normality such as preeclampsia, Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelets (HELLP) syndrome, and previously unknown medical conditions (see Chapter 16: ‘Emergencies in midwifery’ where pregnancy-related conditions are discussed in greater depth).

“Fundamentals of Midwifery: A Textbook for Students” by Louise Lewis
from Fundamentals of Midwifery: A Textbook for Students
by Louise Lewis
Wiley, 2015

Because of the increased risk of fetal anomalies, a determination of maternal serum α-fetoprotein and early ultrasonographic studies are of greater importance for these patients.

“Netter's Obstetrics and Gynecology E-Book” by Roger P. Smith
from Netter’s Obstetrics and Gynecology E-Book
by Roger P. Smith
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Biophysical profiles may be done as often as daily during a high-risk pregnancy.

“Maternal & Child Health Nursing: Care of the Childbearing & Childrearing Family” by Adele Pillitteri
from Maternal & Child Health Nursing: Care of the Childbearing & Childrearing Family
by Adele Pillitteri
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010

The biophysical profile (BPP) is a noninvasive dynamic assessment of a fetus that is based on acute and chronic markers of fetal disease.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

The premise of the biophysical profile (BPP) is that assessment of variable factors of fetal biophysical activity are more reliable than examination of a single parameter (e.g., fetal heart rate).

“Mosby's Canadian Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests E-Book” by Kathleen Deska Pagana, Timothy J. Pagana, Sandra A. Pike-MacDonald
from Mosby’s Canadian Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests E-Book
by Kathleen Deska Pagana, Timothy J. Pagana, Sandra A. Pike-MacDonald
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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