Pregnancy Complications Women Need to look out for

 

Pregnancy Complications

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Women whose preeclampsia is severe or getting worse need to deliver early. More than 4 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational hypertension, and it’s also more common in first pregnancies. Other Complications.

Other complications of pregnancy may include the following: Severe, persistent nausea and vomiting. Although having some nausea and vomiting is normal during pregnancy, particularly in the first trimester, some women experience more severe symptoms that last into the third trimester. Women with gestational diabetes often need to go on a strict diet to manage the disease during their pregnancy and need to be regularly monitored post-pregnancy for signs. 13 rows · Apr 19, 2019 · Having a big baby, which can complicate delivery. Baby born with low blood.

Life-threatening conditions that can happen after giving birth include infections, blood clots, postpartum depression and postpartum hemorrhage. Warning signs to watch out for include chest pain, trouble breathing, heavy bleeding, severe headache and extreme pain. BabyCenter is committed to providing the most helpful and trustworthy pregnancy and parenting information in the world.

Our content is doctor approved and evidence based, and our community is moderated, lively, and welcoming.With thousands of award-winning articles and community groups, you can track your pregnancy and baby’s growth, get answers to your toughest questions, and connect. Despite the fact that sharp pain can be the result of normal pregnancy change, there are some warning signs that you need to watch out for in case the sharp pain is the result of a complication. If pain is accompanied by vomiting, fever, chills, heavy bleeding/blood flow, or change in vaginal discharge. Painless vaginal bleeding is a sign of placenta previa, abdominal cramping is a sign of labor, and throbbing pain in the upper quadrant is not a sign of an ectopic pregnancy, making answers A, B, and C incorrect. A 21y.o. client has been diagnosed with hydatidiform mole.

Pregnancy complications. Various complications that develop during pregnancy can pose risks. Examples include an abnormal placenta position, fetal growth less than the 10th percentile for gestational age (fetal growth restriction) and rhesus (Rh) sensitization — a potentially serious condition that can occur when your blood group is Rh. Even with complications, early detection and prenatal care can reduce any further risk to you and your baby.

Some of the most common complications of pregnancy include: high blood pressure.

List of related literature:

Prenatal care otherwise focuses on close monitoring to detect common pregnancy complications such as hypertension, proteinuria, and IUGR.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

It is useful to begin with the pregnancy to document fetal movement and vigor, complications, illnesses, maternal use of any medications, or possible exposure to teratogens, as well as the timing of all complications and exposures (see Chapter 12).

“Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant” by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
from Fanaroff and Martin’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant
by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

include maternal diseases such as severe preeclampsia requiring elective delivery, premature rupture of membranes, uterine abnormalities, placental bleeding (abruptio, previa), multiple-fetus gestation, drug misuse, maternal chronic illnesses, fetal distress, and infection.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, Joseph St. Geme, Nina F Schor, Richard E. Behrman
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

The responsible perinatal healthcare provider should be informed promptly if any of the following findings are present: vaginal bleeding, acute abdominal pain, temperature of 100.4°F or higher, preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, hypertension, and nonreassuring FHR (AAP & ACOG, 2002).

“Perinatal Nursing” by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
from Perinatal Nursing
by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

All pregnant women (regardless of gestational age) who sustain or who are suspected to have sustained serious injuries should be evaluated in the emergency department first, and maternal well-being is prioritized over fetal assessment.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Women should be made aware of symptoms that she needs to report immediately such as pain in the abdomen, uterine contractions, bleeding per vagina or decreased fetal movement.

“Arias' Practical Guide to High-Risk Pregnancy and Delivery: A South Asian Perspective” by Fernando Arias, Amarnath G Bhide, Arulkumaran S, Kaizad Damania, Shirish N Daftary
from Arias’ Practical Guide to High-Risk Pregnancy and Delivery: A South Asian Perspective
by Fernando Arias, Amarnath G Bhide, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences Apac, 2019

Professional prenatal care can help a mother-to-be avoid the consequences of a number of pregnancy-specific illnesses, such as high blood pressure (preeclampsia), pregnancy-induced diabetes, and infection.

“Health and Wellness” by Gordon Edlin, Eric Golanty
from Health and Wellness
by Gordon Edlin, Eric Golanty
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2009

Maternal complications include an increased risk of preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, hyperemesis gravidarum, vaginal hemorrhage, and induced and difficult labors.

“Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk” by Gerald G. Briggs, Roger K. Freeman, Sumner J. Yaffe
from Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk
by Gerald G. Briggs, Roger K. Freeman, Sumner J. Yaffe
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011

If the pregnancy is less than 34 weeks, the fetus appears to be uncompromised and antepartum hemorrhage (APH), and labor have been excluded, she will be managed expectantly for fetal maturity.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

Medical problems such as hypertension, diabetes and epilepsy need careful management in pregnancy, and so the woman will need to be referred for specialist advice at an early stage.

“The Complementary Therapist's Guide to Conventional Medicine E-Book: A Textbook and Study Course” by Clare Stephenson
from The Complementary Therapist’s Guide to Conventional Medicine E-Book: A Textbook and Study Course
by Clare Stephenson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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