Options When Premature Labor Has Started

 

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY: PRETERM LABOUR

Video taken from the channel: MD CRACK


 

Prediction of Preterm Birth

Video taken from the channel: AACC


 

Premature Labor Symptoms

Video taken from the channel: MotherhoodGuru


 

Preterm Birth Education

Video taken from the channel: KP Santa Clara


The onset of labor is the most anticipated event of pregnancy. Find out what signs you should look for and when it’s time to call your health care provider. These tests can be performed before you have any signs of preterm labor or they may be used after labor has begun.

When a baby is born before the 37th week of pregnancy, it is called a preterm. Some women with premature labor and early dilation of the cervix are put on bed rest until the pregnancy progresses. Most babies born prior to 24 weeks have little chance of survival.

Only about 50% will survive and the other 50% may die or have permanent problems. Smoking, drinking, using drugs not prescribed by your doctor or having untreated diabetes can all lead to preterm labor. Eliminate any that apply to you.

Watch your weight. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy can up your odds of developing gestational diabetes and preeclampsia, both of which increase preterm labor risk. The onset of labor is a mysterious process, and only five percent of babies are born on their actual due date.

Two new studies shed light on when Baby will arrive. Drink two or three glasses of water. Call your doctor or midwife if you continue to have contractions every 10 minutes or more often, if any of your symptoms get worse, or.

Nesting can begin at any time during pregnancy but for some women it’s a sign that labor is approaching. Do what you must, but don’t wear yourself out. Save your energy for the harder work of labor ahead.

Feeling the baby has dropped lower. You also may be hooked up to a monitor to check the strength and regularity of your contractions. If you are in premature labor, there are several treatment options available. They include: Antenatal corticosteroids, which work to mature baby’s lungs in case of an early delivery.

Antibiotics, to treat infection. In these cases, the doctor may recommend a procedure called cervical cerclage if you are less than 24 weeks pregnant, you have a history of preterm labor or a short cervix, or there is an indication that your cervix has begun to dilate. Hydroxyprogesterone is a form of progestin, a manmade form of a female hormone called progesterone. Hydroxyprogesterone is used to lower the risk of premature birth in a woman who has already had one premature baby. Hydroxyprogesterone will not stop premature labor that has already begun.

Hydroxyprogesterone is not for use in women who are pregnant with more.

List of related literature:

For women with these risk factors, caregivers may recommend options such as bed rest, medications, and cervical cerclage, to stop preterm labor and prevent a premature birth.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Options include awaiting spontaneous labor and induction of labor with prostaglandins or oxytocin once maternal injuries have been addressed.

“High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult” by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, Carl P. Weiner, Bernard Gonik
from High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult
by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

• Severe maternal hypertension—control of maternal blood pressure should be the priority before induction of labor is initiated.

“Intrapartum Management Modules: A Perinatal Education Program” by Betsy B. Kennedy, Donna Jean Ruth, Elizabeth Jean Martin
from Intrapartum Management Modules: A Perinatal Education Program
by Betsy B. Kennedy, Donna Jean Ruth, Elizabeth Jean Martin
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Continue LMWH until a planned induction to keep all regional anesthetic options open but accept the increased risk of maternal and child delivery complications associated with induction of labor.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice” by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, Jay D. Iams, MD, Charles J. Lockwood, MD, MHCM, Thomas Moore, MD, Michael F Greene, MD
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice
by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

To prevent PPH, health care providers actively manage third-stage labour by clamping the cord before pulsations have stopped, administering uterotonics to increase uterine contractions, and providing steady traction on the cord and counterpressure on the fundus, causing earlier expulsion of the placenta.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Options for second trimester termination of pregnancy include dilation and evacuation (D&E) and induction of labor using systemic or intrauterine installation agents (Table 25-1).

“Blueprints Obstetrics and Gynecology” by Tamara L. Callahan, Aaron B. Caughey
from Blueprints Obstetrics and Gynecology
by Tamara L. Callahan, Aaron B. Caughey
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott William & Wilkins, 2009

Labor can be managed in such cases without a high maternal or fetal risk, but assisted shortening of the second stage of labor is recommended.47 Strict limits on physical exertion and prolonged periods of bed rest may be required.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, Jay D. Iams, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Lesley Frazier
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

To prevent PPH, health care providers actively manage third-stage labor by clamping the cord before pulsations have stopped, administering uterotonics to increase uterine contractions, and providing steady traction on the cord and counterpressure on the fundus, causing earlier expulsion of the placenta.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier, 2013

If risk factors such as premature dilation of the cervix or bleeding are present, abstinence from orgasm and nipple stimulation during the last trimester is recommended to help avert preterm labor.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

The primary objectives in the anesthetic management of parturients undergoing general anesthesia for nonobstetric surgery are as follows: to (1) ensure maternal safety; (2) avoid teratogenic drugs; (3) avoid intrauterine fetal asphyxia; and (4) prevent the induction of preterm labor.

“Anesthesia: A Comprehensive Review E-Book” by Brian A. Hall, Robert C. Chantigian
from Anesthesia: A Comprehensive Review E-Book
by Brian A. Hall, Robert C. Chantigian
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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10 comments

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  • I am 29w3d. for the past 3-4 days I have had pressure down below, cramps, diahhrea, more discharge and it’s also kinda snotty like. Idk what mine is. This is my third pregnancy, second baby. also baby is breech, 3lbs8oz-3lbs11oz and I am measuring 2 weeks ahead. The only thing I don’t have is contractions. or a bloody show

  • I’m not sure if I’m having Braxton hicks contractions. the last few days I’ve been getting a fluttering sensation right where my uterus is and then I get like this tightening sensation too. The fluttering tickles and sometimes I will feel a little pressure. it happens a lot thru out the day. I’m not bleeding not in pain. should I be concerned?

  • Am 32 weeks have some pain going an coming an feeling like I want to used the toilet but am not doing anything when I go to the toilet more than feeling pain

  • not true there is prodromal labor where you get these symptoms at certain type day usually night for few hrs or all night but not in day. all this you speak of is text book and 80% time it’s no where like textbook labor. especially in pregnancy 3+ I’m on baby 5 at 36 weeks and been soft and 50 effaced since 30 weeks and last week told prob won’t get to their 39 week mark also my baby engaged at 34 weeks

  • Thank you so much. I’m in my second pregnancy, 24 weeks, started having Braxton Higs contractions. Not painful but sweating through the 3-5 minute contraction (could be longer). And my baby moves a lot! I only get it at the bottom of the uterus, can’t explain that, and feels like my uterus is contracting so much that I break out a sweat! Two contractions since it started, about both 5min long and about 12 hours apart. I went into labor a month before the due date with my daughter, but they could stop it cause I was having a C-section. C-section sceduled for my baby boy too. Just hope and pray I don’t go into labor with him too, even at 36 weeks. If the contractions increase, I’m certainly off to the hospital! No way I’m gonna go through too many Braxton Higs without Medical Attention and help! Thanks again. You really put me at ease about this.

  • baxton hicks have been a nightmare scinse week 30. im 33 wks 4 days. braxton hicks are taking its toll. i dont know when to go to the er. i have pressure on my pelvis and on my back. contractions come in slow and slowly start to progress. id does not let me sleep. constant diareah,

  • I had my first child at 28 weeks the second at 34 weeks both due to preeclampsia. This time I haven’t had a problem (so far) with that, but I have been contracting. I’ll be 30 weeks monday. The contractions do go away after a few hours, but every day they get stronger and last longer. They are getting to the point where I can hardly breath through them. Really worrying me. I’ve been drinking a lot of water hoping that helps.

  • hi my daughter is having back pain pressure and discharge she go to labor and delivery and they send it back home as a mother I don’t know what to do her name is darianna thank you

  • I had all these symptoms (minus the mucous plug or dilation) this morning, and there was nothing wrong, still having these symptoms but I AM NOT going to the hospital (I’m 34 weeks) this is my second baby, and if all I can get out of the “residents” in the labor and delivery ward is a “ya-huh” to the things I’m telling them, then I don’t want to go in again, it’s just frustrating and a waste of time. (Also if there was something I really couldn’t handle anymore, aka pain, I would go in, so I’m not trying to arrogant or ignorant, just frustrated!)

  • Thank you so much for your information. It was a big relief for my wife and I. She had the symptoms couple days a go she hospitalized for 4 hours and got that shot and contractions and baby moves were monitored. She was discharged from the hospital and now she is bed rest and having a lot of fluids ( more water). She is 29 weeks now. will cross our figures and thank you again.