MMR Vaccine While Pregnant

 

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Video taken from the channel: DrNari


 

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Acquiring rubella (German measles) during pregnancy can cause miscarriage and other major problems, so women are encouraged to stay up to date on MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccinations as a way to decrease the risks. But if you accidentally got an MMR vaccination during pregnancy, should you worry?Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) MMR vaccines should not be administered to women known to be pregnant or attempting to become pregnant.

Because of the theoretical risk to the fetus when the mother receives a live virus vaccine, women should be counseled to avoid becoming pregnant for 28 days after receipt of MMR vaccine. Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine is the best protection against three diseases. It’s important to get the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine at least a month before becoming pregnant, in order to protect against rubella during pregnancy, which can cause a miscarriage or serious birth defects. Varicella–also known as chickenpox, varicella is a common childhood illness that, if contracted during pregnancy, can cause birth defects or complications with the pregnancy.

As with MMR, this vaccine should be received at least one month in advance of attempting to become pregnant. Vaccination During Your. Moms, get a whooping cough vaccine (also called Tdap) and a flu shot during each pregnancy.

Use our Adult Vaccine Self-Assessment Tool to get a customized printout of recommended vaccines to take to the next medical appointment. Whooping cough. Whooping cough, known as pertussis, can be serious for anyone, but for a newborn, it can be life-threatening. About 7 in 10. Some vaccines, such as the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, should be given a month or more before pregnancy if a pregnant woman didn’t get the vaccine as a child.

Live virus vaccines, such as the MMR and chickenpox shots, should not be given to pregnant women, but should be given to women before or after pregnancy, if indicated. Theoretically, the MMR vaccine could lead to a rubella (German measles) infection in a pregnant woman, but studies to date show the real risk to be nonexistent. Coming down with rubella (German measles) during pregnancy is known to cause intellectual disability, deafness, eye problems, and heart defects in babies.

CDC’s Pregnancy and Vaccination Home Page. Resources on maternal vaccines for pregnant women, friends, family, caregivers, ob-gyns, midwives, and other healthcare professionals. Information on vaccination before, during and after pregnancy. Emphasis on receiving the flu and whooping cough vaccines during pregnancy.

Ideally, the vaccine should be given between 27 and 36 weeks of pregnancy. Getting the flu shot and the Tdap vaccine during pregnancy can protect you from infection and can also help protect your baby after birth before he or she can be vaccinated. This is important because the flu and whooping cough can be particularly dangerous for infants. The vaccine can be given any time during pregnancy, but experts recommend getting the vaccine as early as possible in the third trimester (between 27 and 36 weeks of pregnancy).

The whooping cough vaccine is also recommended for other adults who spend time with your baby. Learn more about the whooping cough vaccine and pregnancy.

List of related literature:

MMR vaccine is contraindicated during pregnancy.

“CDC Yellow Book 2020: Health Information for International Travel” by CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. (CDC), Gary W. Brunette
from CDC Yellow Book 2020: Health Information for International Travel
by CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. (CDC), Gary W. Brunette
OXFORD University Press, 2019

Therefore, a vaccine must provide a boost in maternal antibody in the third trimester to give the infant an increased level of IgG to specific pathogens potentially encountered in the first weeks to months of life.

“Mucosal Immunology” by Jiri Mestecky, Warren Strober, Michael W. Russell, Hilde Cheroutre, Bart N. Lambrecht, Brian L Kelsall
from Mucosal Immunology
by Jiri Mestecky, Warren Strober, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2015

The benefit of vaccinating a pregnant woman outweighs the risk when the risk for disease exposure is high, infection may harm the mother or infant, and the vaccine is unlikely to cause harm.

“Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book” by Sarah S. Long, Charles G. Prober, Marc Fischer
from Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book
by Sarah S. Long, Charles G. Prober, Marc Fischer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Influenza vaccination is recommended during second and third trimesters of pregnancy because of increased risk for hospitalisation Measles livevirus vaccine (MMR) One dose SC; second dose at least 1 month later.

“Mosby's Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing and Health Professions Australian & New Zealand Edition eBook” by Peter Harris, Sue Nagy, Nicholas Vardaxis
from Mosby’s Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing and Health Professions Australian & New Zealand Edition eBook
by Peter Harris, Sue Nagy, Nicholas Vardaxis
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

The benefit of vaccinating a pregnant woman may outweigh the risk when the risk for disease exposure is high; infection may harm the mother or infant, and the vaccine is unlikely to cause harm.

“Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book” by Sarah S. Long, Larry K. Pickering, Charles G. Prober
from Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book
by Sarah S. Long, Larry K. Pickering, Charles G. Prober
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Measles vaccine (a component of the MMR vaccine) isn’t given during pregnancy because of the theoretical risk to the fetus from the vaccine, though there have been no reports of problems among newborns whose mothers were inadvertently vaccinated.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

In general, the protection gained by vaccination during pregnancy usually outweighs the risks.38 Live virus or attenuated vaccines (measles, mumps, poliomyelitis, rubella, yellow fever, and varicella) may cause infection or malformation (or both) in the fetus and are therefore contraindicated.

“Emergency Medicine E-Book: Clinical Essentials (Expert Consult Online)” by James G. Adams
from Emergency Medicine E-Book: Clinical Essentials (Expert Consult Online)
by James G. Adams
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

There are some conflicting data on the immunogenicity of the YF vaccine during pregnancy.

“The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual E-Book” by Christopher A. Sanford, Elaine C. Jong
from The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual E-Book
by Christopher A. Sanford, Elaine C. Jong
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

For women who have not had rubella or women who are serologically not immune (titre of 1:8 or enzyme immunoassay level less than 0.8), a subcutaneous injection of rubella vaccine is recommended in the immediate postpartum period to prevent the possibility of contracting rubella in future pregnancies.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Women who are not immune should be vaccinated before they become pregnant, and they should be advised not to become pregnant for 28 days after vaccination because of the possible risk to the fetus from the live-virus vaccine, although the actual risk appears to below.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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