Exactly What Does It Mean to possess a Sunny Side Up Baby

 

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Baby born sunny side up!!

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What does it mean when my baby is “sunny side up”?

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BACK LABOR | How to Survive a Sunny Side Up Baby

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What Does a Sunny Side Up Baby Mean?

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Also known as the occiput posterior position (OP), or posterior position, a sunny side up baby is a baby positioned head down but facing mom’s abdomen, so the baby’s occipital bone (the skull. Most women have heard about breech birth, but the sunny side up position is actually the most common abnormal position for a baby. The medical term for the sunny side up position is occiput posterior or OP position. The baby is head down but turned the wrong way. The occiput – the back part of the head – is posterior, so the baby’s face is pressed up against the pubic bone.

There is some good news that if even if you start your baby in the sunny side up position, the chances of the baby getting into the right position before delivery are there. It is nice situation if posturing could improve the odds, but till now it has not been of any help. The posterior position (or occiput posterior position) means that the baby is face-up, or “sunny side up,” instead of face-down, so the hardest part of her head rests near your lower back instead.

My baby was sunny side up. I had natural childbirth in a birthing center. I did have back labor, but it was manageable with good comfort measures.

The midwives were able to reach in and turn baby during about three contractions when I was six centimeters dilated. That hurt, but then it all went a lot faster, so it was worth a few minutes of pain. The technical term is occiput posterior (OP) position. This term refers to the fact that the back of your baby’s skull (the occipital bone) is in the back (or posterior) of your pelvis. You may also hear this position referred to as “face-up” or “sunny-side up.”.

I had to have oxygen and they kept having me switch positions [to get her to turn I assume..didn’t work though, I eventually did deliver her sunny side up but it was a big effort]. A c-section was never talked about..I don’t think it’s routine just because the baby is sunny side..it’s totally doable just be prepared to push longer. An average-sized or smaller baby.

Someone whose posterior baby changes from right to left after doing inversions and other balancing work, though the baby is still posterior. A woman with a baby in the Left Occiput Posterior, especially if the baby’s chin is tucked or flexed. The baby’s back shifts right and left and right again, trying to turn his little forehead out of the narrow pointy space at the mother’s pubic bone.

But the pelvis isn’t round so he can’t. He’ll have to come up and out, away from the brim to turn. He can only do that if the mom relaxes her ligaments, and gets upside down a bit each day. You may have heard of ‘back labor’, or a baby born ‘sunny side up’?

These are two indications of a baby in a posterior position, which causes a longer labor due a dysfunctional contraction pattern and more pain.

List of related literature:

Baby is facing “sunny side up” at birth.

“Expecting 411 (4th edition): The Insider's Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth” by Ari Brown, Michele Hakakha
from Expecting 411 (4th edition): The Insider’s Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth
by Ari Brown, Michele Hakakha
Windsor Peak Press, 2017

OP babies are sometimes referred to as “sunny-side up,” and while they can absolutely be delivered vaginally, childbirth may be a bit more difficult.

“The Mama Natural Week-by-Week Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth” by Genevieve Howland
from The Mama Natural Week-by-Week Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth
by Genevieve Howland
Gallery Books, 2017

If baby’s facing your tummy (called occiput posterior, but also known by the much cuter nickname “sunny-side up”), it’s a setup for back labour (see page 365) because his or her skull will be pressing on your spine.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

The loss of fluids, combined with the demands made on Yin during pregnancy, may lead to there being insufficient Yin in the body, which means that the body can become too hot.

“Pregnancy and Childbirth E-Book: A holistic approach to massage and bodywork” by Suzanne Yates
from Pregnancy and Childbirth E-Book: A holistic approach to massage and bodywork
by Suzanne Yates
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Drying and covering the baby to conserve heat.

“Becoming a Midwife in the 21st Century” by Ian Peate, Cathy Hamilton
from Becoming a Midwife in the 21st Century
by Ian Peate, Cathy Hamilton
Wiley, 2013

Holding or placing the baby, so that the head is lower than the body and is turned somewhat to the side for drainage.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

Sunny side up.

“Professional Cooking for Canadian Chefs” by Wayne Gisslen, Mary Ellen Griffin, Le Cordon Bleu
from Professional Cooking for Canadian Chefs
by Wayne Gisslen, Mary Ellen Griffin, Le Cordon Bleu
John Wiley & Sons, 2006

Placing the baby in skin-to-skin contact with their mother or the father helps the baby in maintaining their body heat, but the baby needs to be thoroughly dry.

“Myles' Textbook for Midwives E-Book” by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
from Myles’ Textbook for Midwives E-Book
by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Possible Positions for Birth

“Infant and Toddler Development from Conception to Age 3: What Babies Ask of Us” by Mary Jane Maguire-Fong, Marsha Peralta
from Infant and Toddler Development from Conception to Age 3: What Babies Ask of Us
by Mary Jane Maguire-Fong, Marsha Peralta
Teachers College Press, 2018

Warm delivery room, drying the baby after birth, skin‐to‐skin care by the mother, covering the baby including the head, and delayed bathing.

“Neonatology at a Glance” by Tom Lissauer, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Lawrence Miall, Jonathan Fanaroff
from Neonatology at a Glance
by Tom Lissauer, Avroy A. Fanaroff, et. al.
Wiley, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Had back labor with both my kids but my 1st was way way worse because I was induced. Pitocin made the pain intolerable felt like my back was breaking.

  • 2vbac baby due in late February here! I’m a doula and I am having this one at home �� in water!!! Pelvic pain is real. no way I can birth this time without water lol