Cervix Dilation Chart Stages at work

 

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Cervix Dilation Chart: The Stages of Labor. Written by Chaunie Brusie — Updated on July 8, 2020. The first stage of labor ends when a woman’s cervix. Cervical effacement and dilation happens in the first stage of labor, which can be further broken down into three phases: the early phase, the active phase, and the transition phase.

Here’s how. Between the early stages of labor to the point of delivery, the cervix opens up from a tight, closed hole to an opening the size of a large bagel. With the aid of a cervix dilation chart, we take a look at what these cervix sizes look like. The article also looks at what people can expect at each stage of labor.

Active stage of labor. A woman is considered to be in the active stage of labor once the cervix dilates to around 3 to 4 cm and contractions begin to get longer, stronger, and closer together. The active stage of labor is characterized more by the rate of regular cervical dilation. In the early stages of labor, contractions are often mild, and the cervix dilates to the following sizes: 0 cm, Blueberry 1 cm, Cherry 2 cm, Strawberry 3 cm, Apricot 4 cm “I TRUST my BODY and my BABY” During active labor, contractions become more intense and more regular, gradually opening the cervix even more. Kiwi 5 cm, Plum 6 cm, Lemon 7 cm.

Cervical effacement and dilation. During the first stage of labor, the cervix opens (dilates) and thins out (effaces) to allow the baby to move into the birth canal. In figures A and B, the cervix is tightly closed.

In figure C, the cervix is 60 percent effaced and 1 to 2 cm dilated. In figure D, the cervix is 90 percent effaced and 4 to 5 cm dilated. Early Labor Phase – The time of the onset of labor until the cervix is dilated to 3 cm. Active Labor Phase – Continues from 3 cm. until the cervix is dilated to 7 cm.

Transition Phase – Continues from 7 cm. until the cervix is fully dilated to 10 cm. Each phase is characterized by different emotions and physical challenges. Cervical effacement and dilation.

During the first stage of labor, the cervix opens (dilates) and thins out (effaces) to allow the baby to move into the birth canal. In figures A and B, the cervix is tightly closed. In figure C, the cervix is 60 percent effaced and 1 to 2 cm dilated.

In figure D, the cervix is 90 percent effaced and 4 to 5 cm dilated. Cervix Dilation Chart: The Stages of Labor. What Do Different Types of Labor Contractions Feel Like?

Natural Ways to Induce Labor. Why Vaginal Pressure During Pregnancy Is Totally Normal. Related: Cervix dilation chart: The stages of labor.

Most of the effacement happens in the early stage of labor, when your cervix is dilating from 0 to 6 centimeters. This stage generally.

List of related literature:

A prolonged latent phase is more likely if labor begins “before the cervix is ready.”5 Just as there is a wide range of prelabor uterine activity, so too is there a wide range of cervical softness, effacement, and dilation at the start of labor.

“Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book” by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, Lawrence C Tsen, Warwick D Ngan Kee, Yaakov Beilin, Jill Mhyre, Brian T. Bateman, Naveen Nathan
from Chestnut’s Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book
by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

• In the second stage of labour, the cervix is fully dilated, the baby proceeds down the birth canal and the child is born (see Figure 4.11, pictures B, C and D). is stage may take about half an hour, but in first pregnancies it often lasts up to two hours.

“Child Development and Education” by Teresa M. McDevitt, Jeanne Ellis Ormrod, Glenn Cupit, Margaret Chandler, Valarie Aloa
from Child Development and Education
by Teresa M. McDevitt, Jeanne Ellis Ormrod, et. al.
Pearson Higher Education AU, 2012

However, the degree of cervical dilatation varies, and it is possible to distinguish two groups of women in preterm labor: those with cervices dilated 3 or more cm are in advanced preterm labor and those with a cervical dilatation greater than 1 but less than 3 cm are in early preterm labor.

“Practical Guide to High Risk Pregnancy and Delivery E-Book” by Fernando Arias, Amarnath G Bhide, Arulkumaran S, Kaizad Damania, Shirish N Daftary
from Practical Guide to High Risk Pregnancy and Delivery E-Book
by Fernando Arias, Amarnath G Bhide, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

It begins with the onset of true labor contractions and ends with complete dilation (10 cm) and effacement (100%) of the cervix.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

The second stage begins at full cervical dilation (10 cm) and ends with delivery of the fetus.

“Nurse Anesthesia E-Book” by John J. Nagelhout, Sass Elisha, Karen Plaus
from Nurse Anesthesia E-Book
by John J. Nagelhout, Sass Elisha, Karen Plaus
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

The active phase starts when the cervix is 3–4 cm dilated.

“Llewellyn-Jones Fundamentals of Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book” by Jeremy J N Oats, Suzanne Abraham
from Llewellyn-Jones Fundamentals of Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book
by Jeremy J N Oats, Suzanne Abraham
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Stage two begins with the complete dilation of the cervix and ends with the birth of the baby, while stage three involves the birth of the placenta.

“Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series” by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
from Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series
by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2012

The second stage of labor begins at full cervical dilation (10 cm) and ends when the infant is born.

“NCLEX-RN Questions and Answers Made Incredibly Easy!” by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
from NCLEX-RN Questions and Answers Made Incredibly Easy!
by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

• Labor has three stages: the first stage is from labor onset until full dilation of the cervix; the second stage is from full cervical dilation until delivery of the baby; and the third stage begins with delivery of the baby and ends with delivery of the placenta.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Dilation increases with each phase of this stage, until your cervix is about 10 centimeters in diameter.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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14 comments

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  • @ 0:17, vaginas are not that wide open I’m always confused why pictures and props make them like that but I guess if your about to give birth they do open up some

  • Hi, I am 37weeks 3days pregnant, today my doctor did pv and said cervix is soft and baby is in station 2. can you please tell me what does it mean? Thnx

  • What does it mean if i am 41 weeks pregnant and at -1 station? I was told that it meant that baby’s head cannot fit in my pelvis and they did a c-section on me due to that. The doctor didn’t even try to induce me. Should I have tried the induction first?

  • You have to breath the best position is on a birthing stool or standing up leaning forward and breathing. I promise. Your body will naturally relax through breathing allowing your cervix to open more with each breath. I also used a heating pad for my back and ice for my lower abdomen to assist with the contraction pain. I hope this helps for expecting first time moms. I’m on my third natural birth and this works everytime.

  • good lecture…but rupture of membranes before 37 weeks is PPROM(PRETERM PREMATURE RUPTURE OF MEMBRANE). PROM is rupture after 37 weeks but before the onset of labour. Also crowning is when maximum diameter of foetal head stretches vulva and does not recede in between contractions.

  • Thankyou Armando Hasudungan for creating all these wonderful vidoes. Your videos are presented in a very understandable and unforgettable way. Everytime when i have presentation in class your video’s help me to do a very nice presentation. Thankyou very much and keep up the good work.����

  • very great and informative video that helps introducing labour process!! i learnt alot from your video

    I’m leaving a comment to correct the term “premature rupture of membrane”

    Prelabour rupture of membrane (PROM): rupture of membrane >37 week
    Preterm prelabour rupture of membrane (PPROM): the condition u talked in video

    Now people have stopped using the term “premature” in describing the condition because it causes confusion. Although you may find it on google, but it is not correct

  • Awesome Video! Thank you for your level of detail and especially the drawings! They help A LOT. I especially appreciate that you point out what every single thing is in your drawings, even if you’ve drawn it before/ said it before.

  • Just got checked yesterday and was 1cm dilated and 50% effaced, my ob wants to see me this morning lol I hope that means I’m progressing. I’m 38 weeks pregnant

  • thanks for the video. but i think it is not necessary to talk through where everything is on every single drawing as it is the same most of the time… it made video really long and hard to watch.

  • Thank you for your sharing of knowledge and outstanding illustrations! The chemistry behind the laboring woman is never fully learned and I sincerely appreciate your voice of expertise in the matter; you really break down the happenings and the counter happenings so clearly. It is very helpful that your work is both intricate and multi-layered, but also easy to comprehend. #birthinglittlehumans

  • I’m now 22 weeks on my pregnancy and glad to see this video. It’s very informative at the same time scary since it’s my first time.

  • Im 35 weeks pregnant, I had bloody show and went to the hospital and they said im on preterm labour but my uterus is not contracting. Can you show us some pathologies during the 1st stage of labour particularly at latent phase.

  • Thank You for your videos. I  am scared to ask my Doctor any questions, even though I have only asked one question about the Placenta at my 20 week ultrasound. The Doctor ignored me, when I asked a second time He said I don’t have time to answer. I guess they were busy that day. Every doctor appointment He is “Mr. Personality”  dry as dust. I am a pretty bright and bubbly person and can carry a conversation with anyone. This is my husband and I first baby so anything I need to know I have read my books or googled, You tubed, ect. I am 37+4 days and was checked for the first time yesterday. I HAD to ask if I was dialated, turns out I wasn’t. He didn’t wipe off my stomach when He was checking heartbeat, didn’t help me get off the table, I about fell trying to roll over to get a grasp to pull myself up  he just filled out my paperwork and left the room and was “done” with me. I DREAD my doctor apts. He didn’t warn me that I will maybe cramp or spot after checking. I was up for 3 hours with  contractions lower abdominal cramping and bachaches. I waited them out for 3 hours because I did not want to make a trip to ER knowing they were  practice contractions which they were they never got closer,ect. If I had insurance I sure would be going to another Ob, He is the only one in  our area that will work with you. if you don’t.Thank You again for your videos. They are very helpful!!:) I wish You were my Doctor!!