Being Ready for a Scheduled Cesarean Section

 

Final OR Prep Before C-Section

Video taken from the channel: Memorial Hermann


 

C Section Preparation Things You Should Do Before C-Section Procedure

Video taken from the channel: Nery HR


 

Planned caesarean section at North Bristol NHS Trust

Video taken from the channel: North Bristol NHS Trust


 

SCHEDULED C-SECTION TWINS PREP & BIRTH STORIES | Planned Cesarean Section | Mai Zimmy

Video taken from the channel: Mai Zimmy


 

Preparing For A C-Section: Woman’s Hospital: Baton Rouge LA

Video taken from the channel: WomansHospitalBR


 

17 Tips for a C-Section Delivery | MUST WATCH!

Video taken from the channel: Alexsis Mae


Your doctor is particularly likely to recommend a c-section in this case if your baby is expected to be more than 9 pounds 15 ounces, or you had a previous baby who suffered trauma during a vaginal birth. Your baby is in a breech or transverse position. You’re near full-term and have placenta previa. In preparation for your C-section, you will be asked to do the following: Change into a hospital gown and provide a urine sample. Have an intravenous line (IV) started in your arm or hand.

Through this you will receive necessary fluids and medications as needed. If you are planning for a scheduled C-section or want to prepare yourself in the event an emergency C-section is necessary, you should be aware of the details of the procedure, get the necessary testing done, and create a hospital plan with your doctor. Part 1. A scheduled cesarean delivery (as compared to an unscheduled cesarean section) is a cesarean section that has been scheduled, usually, because there are cesarean delivery indications that are known ahead of time or without specific indications, on maternal request. Reasons to schedule a cesarean include: Prior and now repeat cesarean delivery.

Playlist if you wish music to be played. High waisted underwear as ones that are lower may irritate your wound. Baby wipes so you can freshen up easily after your surgery without frequent trips to the bathroom. Postpartum pads as you will still experience the vaginal bleeding.

A woman may want a planned cesarean section to give birth for many reasons. For some, it’s the best choice. But C-sections have risks of their own. As long as there’s no emergency, don’t let. Other reasons for a scheduled c-section include if the baby is breech (feet or bottom first instead of head down), if the baby is very large, or if the mom has a chronic condition such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, or kidney disease, any of which would make a vaginal delivery more dangerous.

6 Tips for Faster Recovery After a Cesarean Section. Reviewed by Rachel Gurevich Reasons for Scheduled Cesarean Sections. By Robin Elise Weiss, PhD, MPH Being Prepared for a Scheduled Cesarean Section.

Reviewed by Rachel Gurevich Giving Birth by a Surgical C-Section. Prepare the client for cesarean delivery in the same way whether the surgery is elective or emergency. Depending on hospital policy: Shave or clip pubic hair. Insert a.

Before you have a cesarean delivery, a nurse will prepare you for the operation. An intravenous line will be put in a vein in your arm or hand. This allows you to get fluids and medications during the surgery.

Your abdomen will be washed, and your pubic hair may be clipped or trimmed.

List of related literature:

Complete previas are generally known in advance, and an elective cesarean section under regional anesthesia is the standard.

“Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant” by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
from Fanaroff and Martin’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant
by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Supportive staff necessary for an emergency cesarean birth (i.e., anesthesia personnel, surgical team, and neonatal resuscitation team) should be notified and on standby (if possible, in the hospital).

“AWHONN's Perinatal Nursing” by Kathleen R. Simpson
from AWHONN’s Perinatal Nursing
by Kathleen R. Simpson
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2013

If it is critical for your health or your baby’s survival that you be delivered immediately, and your labor is progressing slowly or not at all, your doctor may need to perform a cesarean section.

“Your Vegetarian Pregnancy: A Month-by-Month Guide to Health and Nutrition” by Holly Roberts
from Your Vegetarian Pregnancy: A Month-by-Month Guide to Health and Nutrition
by Holly Roberts
Atria Books, 2008

Here’s an overview of what to expect when recovering from a cesarean: For the first twentyfour hours, you need help doing everything—holding your baby, rolling over, sitting up, walking, and using the toilet.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Caesarean section Cs is one of the commonest obstetric procedures to witness in the delivery suite, and students can get involved either during emergency or elective Css.

“Oxford Handbook for Medical School” by Kapil Sugand, Miriam Berry, Imran Yusuf, Aisha Janjua, Chris Bird
from Oxford Handbook for Medical School
by Kapil Sugand, Miriam Berry, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2019

A caesarean section (CS) performed in the second stage of labour carries a greater risk of maternal morbidity, including haemorrhage and blood transfusion, bladder trauma, tears in relation to the uterine incision, and a potential for requiring intensive care.

“Skills for Midwifery Practice Australia & New Zealand edition” by Sara Bayes, Sally-Ann de-Vitry Smith, Robyn Maude
from Skills for Midwifery Practice Australia & New Zealand edition
by Sara Bayes, Sally-Ann de-Vitry Smith, Robyn Maude
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2018

Thus, women attempting a vaginal birth after caesarean section should deliver in a hospital where there are facilities for close monitoring of maternal and fetal wellbeing; ready accessibility to an operating theatre; an experienced obstetric, anaesthetic and paediatric team; and blood transfusion services.

“Essential Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book” by Ian M. Symonds, Sabaratnam Arulkumaran
from Essential Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book
by Ian M. Symonds, Sabaratnam Arulkumaran
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Care After Specific Procedures Cesarean Section Cesarean sections are performed on both an emergency and an elective basis.

“Drain's PeriAnesthesia Nursing E-Book: A Critical Care Approach” by Jan Odom-Forren
from Drain’s PeriAnesthesia Nursing E-Book: A Critical Care Approach
by Jan Odom-Forren
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

The possibility of emergency cesarean section is always present and the operating room should be ready to receive the mother at a short notice.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

For a scheduled cesarean birth, you’ll be able to discuss the procedure with both parents and provide preoperative teaching.

“Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice” by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
from Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice
by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2002

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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18 comments

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  • Very young yes I am 21 age first csection due to march 6 2017 but I didnt fear, just I brave fine so another my preg 2 will csection due to April 2021 during preg yes of covld19.

  • I too had an emergency c section with my first son but due to having an epidural while attempting vaginal birth I had to be put to sleep for the procedure so didn’t get the chance to even experience anything.. But baby #2 and #3 were thankfully natural and vaginal births:).. Congrats on your bundle of joy

  • Omg I’m so glad I came across this video because I’ll be having my second c section and this one is planned unlike my first which was due to having a very narrow pelvis.

  • omg we have the same story, I went to be induced because my baby was past due. I had an issue with my pelvic the baby couldn’t go through.

  • I hate the gas…. I am abt to have another baby, and I swear it felt like my stomach was going to implode from the pain. I swore off certain foods/drinks because of the pain.

  • these are wonderful tips. My baby is not due for another 3 months so at least i know what to expect in case i do have to have a c section

  • I had a planned C-section. Everything about the pregnancy was awesome! No joking. Only that wasn’t fun was I got food poisoning and I spent a week in the hospital. I went in at 7:30am 8:30am done. I had to adamant for the nurse to take the foley out ASAP. She did. I never ask for pain meds. So I went in on a Thursday and I was doing so good they released me on Saturday. The best thing was I want shopping the next day! Then on Monday went walking and carry my son 2 miles total to get my daughter. I was never exhausted, I was washing clothes doing it all. Even when they took out the staples and I was very surprised that it didn’t hurt. I told everyone about how I did and they were amazed at how I recovered. When my friends started to get prepared and they did not like anything about it. Luckily, when I went in to the OB and I said this is the way it was going to happen and I asked my DR if he was on board. He was and from that point I had no fears and happy the entire time. I was cracking jokes with my Drs, we all had a great time. ������❣️

  • Whhaaaat! It’s normal to poop 6 days later? I did not take softeners and I was ok the day after. I would freak out a bit if I went a week without going #2

  • You’re really pretty ��

    I’m a little nervous about my 2nd C section. My first one was an emergency C section and traumatised me quite a bit, especially because I got an infection afterwards.

    Will be going to a public hospital this time around, so really not sure what to expect. I think the level of care is very different, so I’m a bit scared, but I’m hoping all will turn out great

  • I feel so bad for all of the women here talking about their emergency c-sections because I was there too. I felt the incisions then felt them putting their hands in me and nothing was numb. I was screaming until they put the gas over my face and knocked me out. I missed the first few hours of my daughter’s life and the whole experience was a nightmare. I’m having another c-section in September and this time WILL be different. Definitely educate yourself <3

  • I had an emergency Csection 2y ago. This time I opted in for an Elective Csection due to Covid 19 Virus. I hope this is less traumatic. Good luck to all of you. I found very good that Bio Oil. Also massaging the Scar when bathing/showering.Keep an eye for your temperature.I had high fever and Possibly an infection.In the UK you just stay 24hrs not.4days in hospital.I bought lots of food that helps with consipation e.g prunes etc dry fruit.Yes high Waste Underwear but disposable ones at 1st or Black colour only.
    I used a back support back then.This time I bought a 3in 1 Postpatrum bellt support from Amazon. Also rest.I didnot take my pain medications back then as I was forgetting and also breastfeeding.Best express some so your partner can feed them.

  • Even though I’ve already had a csection I had to watch your video!
    I was lucky I went poo the next day after surgery. but I wasn’t happy because they took my catheter out & from then on I had to get up to go to the bathroom lol but I was only there for 48 hours & got to leave because everything was going well. the pain meds were great they gave me IV pain meds for the first day & then pills. I found that the prescription ibuprofen worked better than pain meds. & only took ibuprofen once at home because pain pills scare me.
    glad you & baby are doing well!:)

  • Having my third c-section in December ���� some nurses are super nice but sometimes there’s that one or two that are very rude.. idk if it’s cause I’m young �� I’m 21 yrs old and I had my first when I was 18. But I’m happily married to their daddy for 4 years now:) but yaa I had some nurses get mad at me and give attitude when they would try getting me to walk but it was soo painful �� and they would just force me to get up and when I had to use the washroom I wasn’t able to do #2 or #1 for like 3-4 days and I kept telling the nurse that I was trying but I still felt really numb down there and I didn’t want to push too hard and the nurse got soo mad at me:( and she had to put the catheter back which was horrible:S but then I had a couple of other nurses that was super nice and would take their time to help me:)

  • I became dehydrated after my 1st c-section. i went home:( i couldn’t keep water down and tmi my 1st # 2 took an hr to come out and was huge and bloody took a week to finally poo ����

  • I just had my 3rd C-section 10 days ago. My daughter is named Willow too!! I had a tubal along with it and I feel like my healing process is a bit harder this time around so I’m doing research as to what’s normal, what’s not, and what I can do to help myself heal.

  • I just love your vlogs, very detailed and understandable. Can’t wait to get pregnant with twins and watch your vlogs from beginning again.

  • One thing that SO helped me with my gas after the c-section was drinking warm apple juice! I couldn’t get out of the bed because of the pain and could BARELY tighten up my stomach to push any gas out (as you can imagine it would require more force trying to get gas out while laying on your back) so my nurse actually suggested warm apple juice and I’m telling you not long after drinking that the gas was literally just slipping out of me, without much effort required lol just a tip for anyone going into a c-section!

  • Thank you so much for sharing all of these helpful tips Alexsis. I’ve just recently given birth to my son via emergency c section & I really wish I’d seen your video before! You’ve helped so much & put my mind at ease now that we are back home recovering. You’re so right to ask for help from husband & family they all want to aid your recovery ���� hope you & your beautiful baby & lovely family are well xx