An In-Depth Take a look at Internal Fetal Monitoring

 

Electronic Fetal Monitoring

Video taken from the channel: HEAT Inc., Health Education & Training


 

Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring Part 2

Video taken from the channel: OpenSafety


 

Kendall™ Fetal Spiral Electrode System

Video taken from the channel: Cardinal Health


 

Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring Part 5

Video taken from the channel: OpenSafety


 

Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring Part 4

Video taken from the channel: OpenSafety


 

Electronic Fetal Monitoring

Video taken from the channel: Traci Hansen


 

Re-uploaded: Instrumentation in Intrapartum Surveillance Session by Dr. Prassan Vij

Video taken from the channel: PrepLadder


C-Sections. Internal fetal monitoring involves the placement of an electrode directly onto the scalp of the baby while it is still in the womb. 1  This test is performed to evaluate the baby’s heart rate as well as the variability of heartbeats at the time of labor. While IFM is most often used during high-risk births, it can also be used in a low-risk birth if the care team is unable to get an. There are 2 ways to do fetal heart monitoring, external and internal.

External fetal heart monitoring. This method uses a device to listen to and record your baby’s heartbeat through your belly (abdomen). One type of monitor is a Doppler ultrasound device. It’s often used during prenatal visits to count the baby’s heart rate.

Internal fetal monitoring (IFM) is sometimes used when a pattern of non-reassuring fetal heart tones has been detected during labor. This can include a non-reactive pattern in which the baby’s heart rate drops during contractions, which is a normal occurrence and is expected, but then fail to return to a normal rate after the contraction. The details may vary, but typical electronic fetal monitoring may go like this: The provider will put gel on your belly. This helps to send sound waves from your belly to the computer. The provider puts a device called an ultrasound probe (transducer) on your belly.

As mentioned above, fetal monitors look at both fetal heart rate and uterine contractions. Fetal heart rate may be measured with an external monitoring device or an internal one. Both of these transmit a signal to a console where the patterns are printed on a graph or transmitted to a video screen running at a rate of 3 cm /minute. Monitoring Fetal Distress. When you are in labor, your baby may be monitored all of the time (continuous monitoring) or at set times (intermittent).

Monitoring can also be done externally (outside of the body) or internally (inside of the body), or both. In general, if you’re low risk, you’ll likely experience external, intermittent monitoring. To appropriately interpret a fetal monitoring tracing, the systematic approach below should be followed: Evaluate the recording: is it continuous and adequate for interpretation?

Identify the type of monitor used – external versus internal: second generation versus first generation. Maternal and Fetal Monitoring Systems For half a century, Philips has been at the forefront of innovation in obstetrical care. Learn more about the 50th anniversary, including perspectives from clinical leaders around the world.

Internal fetal monitoring Internal fetal monitoring involves inserting a transducer through your cervical opening and placing it on your baby’s scalp. A transducer is a small, patch-like object. Overview Internal fetal monitoring involves placing a electrode directly on the fetal scalp through the cervix. This test is performed to evaluate fetal heart rate and variability between beats, especially in relation to the uterine contractions of labor.

Review Date 2/22/2010.

List of related literature:

External and internal fetal monitoring is discussed under Evaluation of Fetal Well-being in this Chapter.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

See Chapter 14 for more detailed information on fetal monitoring.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

C. Internal fetal monitoring 1.

“Saunders Canadian Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN” by Linda Anne Silvestri
from Saunders Canadian Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN
by Linda Anne Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences Division, 2016

The details of fetal monitoring for these conditions are covered in Chapter 69.

“High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult” by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, Carl P. Weiner, Bernard Gonik
from High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult
by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

See Table 6.3 for interpretation and interventions of fetal monitor findings.

“Leifer's Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book” by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
from Leifer’s Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book
by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Electronic fetal monitoring It is beyond the scope of this chapter to do other than introduce the subject of electronic fetal monitoring.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Review the concepts related to external fetal monitoring if you had difficulty with this question.

“Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book” by Linda Anne Silvestri
from Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book
by Linda Anne Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Moreover, the use of fetal monitoring is much more likely to predict these complications when compared to KB testing.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

(See Evaluating fetal heart rate, page 1188) Because fetal monitors are varied and complex, first familiarize yourself with the operator’s manual.

“Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice” by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
from Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice
by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2002

Peroperative fetal monitoring is always difficult to interpret and is only useful if clinically relevant.

“Bleeding During Pregnancy: A Comprehensive Guide” by Eyal K. Sheiner
from Bleeding During Pregnancy: A Comprehensive Guide
by Eyal K. Sheiner
Springer New York, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: kutluk.[email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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