Advantages of Parent-Baby Skin-to-Skin Contact

 

Skin to Skin Bonding

Video taken from the channel: Lake Charles Memorial Health System


 

Skin to Skin with your Newborn

Video taken from the channel: Lee Health


 

Skin to Skin Care with parents is safe for tiniest newborns

Video taken from the channel: The Women’s


 

Benefits of skin to skin contact for mom and baby

Video taken from the channel: therhodeshow


 

Kangaroo Care: The Benefits of Holding Your Newborn Close

Video taken from the channel: Cincinnati Children’s


 

Kangaroo care: Skin-to-skin contact

Video taken from the channel: Demystifying Medicine


 

Hospitals use skin to skin contact to help mom and baby

Video taken from the channel: CNN


What are the benefits of skin-to-skin contact with my baby? Skin-to-skin contact offers several benefits for newborns and their moms: Warmth. Newborns can’t regulate their body temperature well (such as by shivering to keep warm).

Your body heat keeps your baby warm and cozy. Comfort. Researchers have found that newborns who had more skin-to-skin contact. If you’re about to be a first-time parent, the benefits of skin-to-skin contact can’t be overstated. Besides helping to create a lasting bond between.

Just 10 minutes of skin-to-skin contact reduces babies’ levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and increases levels of the “cuddle hormone” oxytocin, which stimulates the parasympathetic nervous. “The skin-to-skin contact causes a release in oxytocin—known as the ‘love hormone’—in the mom. It helps the uterus contract, which reduces bleeding, and also warms up the mother’s body, which comforts the baby and results in less crying and lower rates of hypoglycemia,” Crowe explains. For baby: Better able to absorb and digest nutrients Better body temperature maintenance Cries less often Demonstrate improved weight gain Experience more stable heartbeat and breathing Higher blood oxygen levels Long-term benefits, such as improved brain development and function as well as parental. Skin to skin contact is a multi-sensory experience.

Holding baby on Dad’s skin increases the development of essential neural pathways, which accelerates brain maturation. Fathers and mothers who hold babies skin-to-skin help keep them calm and cozy. Babies are comforted by skin to skin during procedures. Skin-to-skin may enhance brain development. Fathers and mothers who hold babies skin to skin are thought to have increased confidence and are more relaxed.

Skin-to-skin contact can benefi t fathers by increasing initial bonding and involvement with infants (Hubbard & Gattman, 2017). Most notable in our fi ndings is the increased fi ngertip touching in. But new evidence suggests that being in skin-to-skin contact with a parent does more than just make the baby happy.

It can help to solve breastfeeding problems, prevent hypoglycemia and other newborn difficulties, reduce pain, stabilize premature babies and set the stage for optimal brain development. Studies show that wearing baby close, particularly with a special carrier designed for skin-to-skin contact, may help regulate baby’s heartbeat, temperature, and breathing patterns while they.

List of related literature:

At birth, skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby has positive benefits.

“Perinatal Nursing” by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
from Perinatal Nursing
by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Early and prolonged skin-to-skin contact has multiple documented benefits for maternal–infant bonding, facilitating safer and easier transition to extrauterine life, improved infant thermoregulation and blood glucose levels, reduced crying, and increased breastfeeding exclusivity and duration.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Skin-to-skin contact between infant and parent (Kangaroo care) promotes bonding.

“Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
from Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by Tom Lissauer, Graham Clayden
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

The benefits of touch are so significant for human growth and development that the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all mothers and babies have skin-to-skin contact in the first hours after birth.

“Psychology in Action” by Karen Huffman, Katherine Dowdell, Catherine A. Sanderson
from Psychology in Action
by Karen Huffman, Katherine Dowdell, Catherine A. Sanderson
Wiley, 2017

As discussed previously, there are significant benefits for both mother and child of early skin-to-skin contact.

“Mayes' Midwifery E-Book: A Textbook for Midwives” by Sue Macdonald
from Mayes’ Midwifery E-Book: A Textbook for Midwives
by Sue Macdonald
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

In addition to being a safe and effective method for infant–parent acquaintance, skin-to-skin contact between parent and infant can have a positive healing effect for the mother with a high-risk pregnancy.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

The advantages of this in engendering better psychological support for parents are clear and there is evidence that skin-to-skin contact is of great importance in promoting infant stability and well-being.

“Neonatology: A Practical Approach to Neonatal Diseases” by Giuseppe Buonocore, Rodolfo Bracci, Michael Weindling
from Neonatology: A Practical Approach to Neonatal Diseases
by Giuseppe Buonocore, Rodolfo Bracci, Michael Weindling
Springer Milan, 2012

Second, the skin-to-skin contact between the mother and baby enhances their psychological bond, which improves health and development.

“Global Health 101: Includes Bonus Chapter: Intersectoral Approaches to Enabling Better Health” by Richard Skolnik
from Global Health 101: Includes Bonus Chapter: Intersectoral Approaches to Enabling Better Health
by Richard Skolnik
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Phillips (2013), reviewed studies regarding the benefits of early skin-to-skin contact between the mother and newborn.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Support to the mother–infant dyad Skin-to-skin contact is between the baby’s front and the mother’s chest.

“Concise Text Book for Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Assuma Beevi
from Concise Text Book for Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Assuma Beevi
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • didnt even get to hold my son after he was born do to c-section. next baby i will demand for them to be layed on my chest skin to skin