7 Strategies for a much safer C-Section

 

Tips for a cesarean section recovery aka c-section

Video taken from the channel: Mom Confessionals


 

Breastfeeding After a Cesarean (7)

Video taken from the channel: Breastfeeding Confidential


 

What is the recovery time after c-section delivery?

Video taken from the channel: SrishtiTheGyneClinic


 

Top 10 Tips to Avoid a C-Section | Midwife Secrets You Need to Know

Video taken from the channel: Cajun Stork Midwife Kira at Natural Birthhouse


 

Reduce Your Risk of an Unnecessary C-Section | Consumer Reports

Video taken from the channel: Consumer Reports


 

How to perform a caesarean section and deliver babies in different positions at caesarean section

Video taken from the channel: MedNav


 

Preventing a C-Section | 3 MIDWIFE TIPS TO DECREASE YOUR RISK

Video taken from the channel: Cajun Stork Midwife Kira at Natural Birthhouse


7 Tips for a Safer C-Section For a Planned Cesarean, Wash Your Body Before Giving Birth. Use antibacterial soap, as it can reduce the amount of Stay Warm. Getting cold either before or during surgery can increase the likelihood of infection.

When you’re waiting Use Clippers, Not Razors. One of. My C-Section Recovery Experience: 7 Things I Wish I Knew Worried about the aftermath of a cesarean section? Follow these C-section recovery tips from a real-life mom, who underwent the surgery for.

3 C-Section Recovery Tips to Develop Better Overall Habits. After the initial recovery, continuing to develop good habits will be key in making your body strong and healthy again. Tip #23: Restore Your Core.

Pregnancy, labor, and abdominal surgery can all mess with your core muscles. If you do opt for a C-section, either by choice or medical reasons, we do have some helpful tips so that your C-section can go as smoothly as possible. Previous Next.

Written by Miss Vanda. Home / Cesarean Delivery / 5 tips for a safer C-section; childbirth pregnant mums caesarean choice mums-to-be. C-section tips for dads and partners. Find out how you can help your partner recover after having a c-section, including tips from other dads. Breastfeeding after a c-section.

Find out what you can do to establish breastfeeding after a c-section, including positions to make breastfeeding more comfortable. Coping with emotions after a c-section. Women may take longer to recover from a cesarean delivery, or C-section, compared with a vaginal birth.

In this article, we look at what to expect in the days, weeks, and months after cesarean. “Remember that your body doesn’t know you have a C-section scheduled,” Consumer Safety’s health and nutrition investigator, Sydney Ziverts, tells Romper. “Since you could go into labor at any time. About a third of births are via C-section. Use these articles to become familiar with the procedure, whether you’re planning one or not.

6 Tips for Faster Recovery After a Cesarean Section. 7 Tips for a Safer C-Section Surgery. Medically reviewed by Anita Sadaty, MD. One of the most challenging parts of post-C-section life is turning over in bed, or leaving bed.

If you have, say, t-shirt material PJs on flannel sheets, you will be bummed. A smooth, silky nightie or pajama bottoms, though, on regular sheets = ahhhh, so much better. 5. Move Around—Slowly. 7. Plan for Extra Support at Home. One of the top tips for cesarean birth is to arrange extra help for when you and the baby come home.

All new Moms need additional support after the birth of a baby from household chores (meal preparation, laundry and dishes), to childcare for older kids, to practical help like feeding, bathing, and soothing the baby.

List of related literature:

F. Prevention of bleeding (guideline 17): breastfeed; assess fundus and massage as needed; expel clots if present once fundus is firm; assess bladder and encourage voiding; allow placenta to separate naturally.

“Study Guide for Maternity & Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Study Guide for Maternity & Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

In fact, the stress of labour can be effectively reduced by the use of regional (epidural) anaesthesia, using slow incremental top-ups of low-dose Marcaine to avoid any sudden changes in blood pressure, and vaginal delivery avoids both the increased haemorrhage and infection risk of caesarean section.

“Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, Stergios Doumouchtsis, Lynette Denny
from Oxford Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, William Ledger, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2019

epidural, spinal anesthesia safe choices for relieving pain.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Another way to avoid unnecessary C-sections is to talk with your healthcare provider.

“The Lose Your Belly Diet: Change Your Gut, Change Your Life” by Travis Stork, M.D.
from The Lose Your Belly Diet: Change Your Gut, Change Your Life
by Travis Stork, M.D.
Bird Street Books, 2016

These include longer, more difficult labors, increased risk of injury to your vagina, bladder, and rectum, and an increased risk of C-section.

“Expecting 411 (4th edition): The Insider's Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth” by Ari Brown, Michele Hakakha
from Expecting 411 (4th edition): The Insider’s Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth
by Ari Brown, Michele Hakakha
Windsor Peak Press, 2017

To limit your chances of developing perineal pain, tears, and incontinence in a vaginal birth, use side-lying or hands-and-knees position during the second stage of labor (pushing phase), don’t hold your breath or strain for prolonged times, and avoid an episiotomy and forceps delivery.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Mode of Birth: the Evidence The evidence regarding the safest mode for breech babies to be born has been somewhat controversial and misleading, with the randomized multicentre Term Breech Trial conducted by Hannah et al. (2000) concluding the safest way to give birth was by planned caesarean section.

“Myles' Textbook for Midwives E-Book” by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
from Myles’ Textbook for Midwives E-Book
by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Compared with vaginal delivery, cesarean section (C-section) is known to modify a newborn’s first bacterial community by preventing normal exposure to the vaginal microbiome and to increase levels of stress hormone at birth [14, 15].

“Immunoepidemiology” by Peter J. Krause, Paula B. Kavathas, Nancy H. Ruddle
from Immunoepidemiology
by Peter J. Krause, Paula B. Kavathas, Nancy H. Ruddle
Springer International Publishing, 2019

IV/C 37,39 Avoid mental and physical stress; consider epidural.

“High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult” by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, Carl P. Weiner, Bernard Gonik
from High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult
by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Preparation for natural childbirth (birth without regional or systemic analgesic drugs) and for vaginal birth after a previous cesarean section can reduce maternal anxiety and the rates of operative delivery and associated complications.”

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, D.M. Phillips, J.E. Scherger, Robert Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, et. al.
Springer New York, 2002

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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7 comments

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  • I’m cryiiiiiing! Goodness.. u.u trying to have all that emotional out now.. and i feel im a lil bit too late but I’m waiting for my labor soon.. u.u Thank u so so much and God bless you! ����

  • The reason I disliked this video is because I knew all of that before watching. I did lots of reading and interviewed midwives in my area. I was hoping this would help since I want a VBAC. I chose to transfer to our mother-baby friendly hospital after 22 hours in labor at home. My midwife found that I was only 2 cm dilated. I didn’t want to wait and see what would happen. On the epidural, I somewhat rested and was able to have painless cervical exams. By the fifth exam, I was 7 cm, 44 hours in labor, baby’s head was swollen and hadn’t descended, so we had to go to the OR. Now, I have to wait 9 months until I can get pregnant again. I really wanted a vaginal birth at home for all it’s benefits. I agree that a childbirth class will be helpful since I didn’t know how to cope with my intense contractions. That said, prepare for the unexpected (e.g. have a hospital bag, have a backup in your birth team, research recovery for both deliveries). You never know what might happen.

  • 14% is actually on the higher end of ideal (WHO states an ideal C section rate is between 10-15% but this includes all types of mothers and all types of scenarios). I actually would have thought midwives would have C section rates of less than 5% because they take on low risk patients and low risk patients are less likely to need a C section in the first place.

  • I know my comment will likely get lost in the shuffle, but I’m really worried about this and wanted to ask someone who could verify. I’ve had the same OB with my first as I do with this baby. They preformed a cervical check on me today but when he was doing it it felt as though he circled his finger once he checked how dilated I was. Was this a membrane sweep? It didn’t exactly hurt as badly as some women tell me it would have but it was very uncomfortable. I’m desperately hoping this wasn’t the case because I don’t think I could continue using him as my OB and I’m already 37 weeks but I’m not sure. ��

  • I’m so grateful I’ve stumbled onto your channel. I am not yet pregnant but know midwife/natural birth is the way I want to go so I’m so excited to have this as a resource. Thank you, Kira, for caring enough to share!

  • Hi mam..I had c section last week… doctor advice me to ware abdomenal belt…but my family refusing to ware……

    Can I ware abdomenal belt.. please tell second opinion.

    There is no harm to stitches..if I ware abdominal belt so soon…

    N when to ware it

  • As a medical student I jst wanaa say ths vdo clears ur dout perfectly & for �� understanding u firstly read the theory of caesarian section it really helps to understand