11 Premature Birth Risks

 

Risk for Preterm Labor

Video taken from the channel: All Health TV


 

Premature Birth: An Under-recognized Problem

Video taken from the channel: Albert Einstein College of Medicine


 

Premature Birth Complications

Video taken from the channel: All Health TV


 

5 Tips for Reducing Your Risk of Preterm Birth

Video taken from the channel: CA Public Health


 

What causes premature births?

Video taken from the channel: AMITA Health


 

High-risk pregnancies: what can I do to avoid a premature birth?

Video taken from the channel: Instituto Bernabeu


 

Preterm Labour

Video taken from the channel: Learning in 10


Other factors that may increase risk for preterm labor and premature birth include: Ethnicity. Preterm labor and birth occur more often among certain racial and ethnic groups. For example, infants of Age of the mother. Women younger than age 18 are more likely to have a preterm delivery. Women.

Infections, especially those of the uterus and urinary tract, can increase the risk of premature birth. Having a high white blood cell count (a marker of infection) is the best predictor of preterm birth from 22 to 27 weeks gestation. Uterine or cervical problems. 11 factors that increase your risk of delivering a premature baby Avoid these risk factors to have a healthy, full-term pregnancy. Some risk factors for preterm birth include delivering a premature baby in the past, being pregnant with multiples, tobacco use and substance abuse, and short time (less than 18 months) between pregnancies.

Additionally, pregnancy complications can result in preterm birth because the baby has to be delivered early. New research has revealed that preterm delivery is an independent risk factor for premature death in women. According to the study published in the journal The BMJ, nearly 11.

Risk factors in your everyday life for preterm labor and premature birth Smoking, drinking alcohol, using street drugs or abusing prescription drugs Having a lot of stress in your life. For example, an untreated gonorrhea infection can increase the risk of miscarriage, premature birth, and low birth weight. Pregnant women who have HIV can transmit the virus to their child during.

Objective: To synthesize the available evidence regarding the incidence and several risk factors of preterm birth. To describe neonatal outcomes according to gestational age and to the context of delivery. Materials and methods: Consultation of the Medline database.

Results: In 2010, 11% of live births (15 million babies) occurred before 37 completed weeks of gestation worldwide. CONCLUSION: Maternal history of prenatal care, preclampsia, PROM, twin pregnancy, placenta praevia, cervicovaginitis, previous preterm delivery and UTI are risk factors with statistical significance associated with preterm delivery. Any kind of systemic inflammation or infection can cause a mom to have her baby early, including infections in the mouth (such as gum disease), vagina, uterus, and kidneys.

Cervical Problems: Insufficient cervix or short cervix both increase the risk of preterm birth, especially if the mom is having labor symptoms.

List of related literature:

Risk factors include preeclampsia, abdominal trauma, smoking, cocaine use, multiple pregnancy, increasing maternal age and parity, polyhydramnios, and previous abruption [41,42].

“Bleeding During Pregnancy: A Comprehensive Guide” by Eyal K. Sheiner
from Bleeding During Pregnancy: A Comprehensive Guide
by Eyal K. Sheiner
Springer New York, 2011

The immediate risks to the mother with GDM are increased incidences of cesarean delivery (,30%), preeclampsia (10%-30%), and polyhydramnios (,10%-20%), which can result in preterm labor.

“Endocrine Secrets E-book” by Michael T. McDermott
from Endocrine Secrets E-book
by Michael T. McDermott
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Maternal risk factors for prematurity include pregnancyinduced hypertension, antepartum hemorrhage, infection, and premature rupture of membranes.

“Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals” by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
from Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals
by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
Wiley, 2007

The major risk factors for prematurity include premature rupture of membranes; intrauterine infection leading to inflammation of the placental membranes (chorioamnionitis); structural abnormalities of the uterus, cervix, and placenta; and multiple gestation (e.g., twin pregnancy).

“Robbins Basic Pathology” by Vinay Kumar, Abul K. Abbas, Nelson Fausto, Richard Mitchell
from Robbins Basic Pathology
by Vinay Kumar, Abul K. Abbas, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Risk factors for abruption include maternal and paternal smoking, preeclampsia, chorioamnionitis, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and cocaine use.

“Swanson's Family Medicine Review” by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
from Swanson’s Family Medicine Review
by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Other risk factors include preterm premature rupture of membranes, polyhydramnios, advanced maternal age, cocaine use, smoking, multiparity, chorioamnionitis, blunt trauma and possibly thrombophilias.

“Critical Care Obstetrics” by Michael A. Belfort, George R. Saade, Michael R. Foley, Jeffrey P. Phelan, Gary A. Dildy
from Critical Care Obstetrics
by Michael A. Belfort, George R. Saade, et. al.
Wiley, 2010

Circulating angiogenic factors in early pregnancy and the risk of preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous preterm birth, and stillbirth.

“Brenner and Rector's The Kidney E-Book” by Maarten W. Taal, Glenn M. Chertow, Philip A. Marsden, Karl Skorecki, Alan S. L. Yu, Barry M. Brenner
from Brenner and Rector’s The Kidney E-Book
by Maarten W. Taal, Glenn M. Chertow, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Risk factors for spontaneous labor and premature rupture of membranes overlap (e.g., infection), as do risk factors for indicated and spontaneous preterm birth (e.g., preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction).

“Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book” by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, Ellen Roy Elias, Heidi M. Feldman, William L. Coleman
from Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book
by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Additional risk factors for preterm birth include stress, occupational fatigue, uterine distention by polyhydramnios or multifetal gestation, systemic infection such as periodontal disease, intrauterine placental pathology such as abruption, vaginal bleeding, smoking,

“Avery's Diseases of the Newborn E-Book” by Christine A. Gleason, Sherin Devaskar
from Avery’s Diseases of the Newborn E-Book
by Christine A. Gleason, Sherin Devaskar
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

These include gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine foetal death, intrauterine growth restrictions, placental abruption, risk of preterm birth, neonatal death and infant death.

“Mental Health Nursing: Applying Theory to Practice” by Gylo (Julie) Hercelinskyj, Louise Alexander
from Mental Health Nursing: Applying Theory to Practice
by Gylo (Julie) Hercelinskyj, Louise Alexander
Cengage Learning Australia, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • I had my genetic testing done at week 12, all the things are normal just one: spontaneous preterm delivery before 34 weeks of pregnancy my risk is 1:102
    What can i do to reduce my risk?

  • Great Video clip! Sorry for chiming in, I would love your thoughts. Have you researched Mackorny Ejaculation Remedy Blueprint (google it)? It is a great one off guide for Curing Premature Ejaculation minus the hard work. Ive heard some awesome things about it and my friend Sam after a lifetime of fighting got amazing results with it.