Working Having a Nanny to deal with Child Behavior Problems

 

2 Year Old Has Constant Temper Tantrums | Supernanny

Video taken from the channel: Supernanny


How can parents work together with the nanny to address specific behavior problems? Sit down together and decide on how closely you’ll work together on discipline. Some parents prefer to consult on the big issues like hitting, aggression, or bullying, whereas other’s like to be looped in on more benign transgressions. “Keeping the work environment a place that’s open for either side to bring up any issues is very important.” Though some changes in circumstances are unforeseen, a nanny should be made aware that a change could take place as soon as a family knows what’s going to happen.

Pro Tips: Give advance notice of any anticipated schedule changes. In a calm manner, show your child what you want them to do and practice! Praise –Aim for the 90:10 rule – praise should be given out 90 percent of the time and limit-setting or discipline should be only 10 percent of the time.

When you catch your child doing something good, reinforce that behavior with positive praise. Use humor with your child/student (s). Make jokes, listen to their jokes, smile often, say something silly, sing something you would normally say, or anything else that would make them smile/laugh (make sure it is age appropriate). 4. Show your child/student (s) that you are happy to see. One simple way to reduce impulsive behavior is by praising your child each time they think before they act or speak.

Say, “Great job using your words when you felt angry today,” or “That was a good choice to walk away when you were mad.”. Each child seemed pleased to have acquired a newfound ability to get back old privileges and some new ones in a predictable and straightforward way. By the third week, the stage was set to have consequences really work. The children now really knew what the rules were and really knew what happened when the rules weren’t broken.

Don’t get anxious by your child’s behavior. When you do, you may be seen as pushy, and that can encourage them to resist you. You can tell them the stories about your childhood and share your experiences to inspire and encourage them to try something new. Do not force your child to take. How to Address Behavior Problems. Minor behavior problems can often be addressed by making a few changes to your discipline strategies.

Look for ways to make discipline more effective. For example, if you’ve been grounding your child for not getting his homework, try offering a positive consequence that motivates him to do his work. But for kids with anger problems, lashing out often becomes a first line of defense. When children struggle to solve problems, resolve conflict, or ask for help, they may be using aggression as a way to get their needs met. Sometimes, teaching new skills can help a child learn that aggressive behavior isn’t necessary.

In order to maintain stability and consistency, it is essential to develop a behavior plan of action with your child’s caretaker. A good childcare provider will be willing to enforce the rules and disciplinary actions that you set.

List of related literature:

Reassure the mother that her child’s behaviour does not worry you or your staff, and try to appear confident.

“Odell's Clinical Problem Solving in Dentistry E-Book” by Avijit Banerjee, Selvam Thavaraj
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Having the child verbally self-state these rules out loud before and during these individual work performances may also be helpful.

“ADHD and the Nature of Self-control” by Russell A. Barkley
from ADHD and the Nature of Self-control
by Russell A. Barkley
Guilford Publications, 1997

Create a “job description” that will benefit the entire family and help avoid frustration down the road, and be open to modifying it if she discovers that, say, doing all the laundry and cooking in addition to her childcare duties is exhausting her.

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Before entering the public place, tell the child that you will write down any episode of misbehavior and the child will then have to go to time out as soon as you get home for any misbehavior.

“Defiant Children, Third Edition: A Clinician's Manual for Assessment and Parent Training” by Russell A. Barkley
from Defiant Children, Third Edition: A Clinician’s Manual for Assessment and Parent Training
by Russell A. Barkley
Guilford Publications, 2013

Prompts to initiate the behavior might include helping the child clean the room, picking up one or two items to model the desired behavior, gently reminding the child, or keeping the child company while he or she cleans.

“Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents” by Alan E Kazdin
from Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents
by Alan E Kazdin
Oxford University Press, 2005

Look for signs of anxiety, such as thumb sucking or rocking during the assessment, and encourage caregivers to be involved in the process to help make the child feel as safe as possible.

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Work with the child in a situation likely to trigger the behavior, and model how to prevent it, by providing an appropriate communication strategy to the child when aggressive behavior seems imminent.

“Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating” by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury
from Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating
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Check-back reduces the possibilities for miscommunication and, at its best, creates an environment of psychological safety where the child is comfortable saying what she thinks and is able to respectfully disagree with the worker’s words or observations.

“Child and Family Practice: A Relational Perspective” by Shelley Cohen Konrad
from Child and Family Practice: A Relational Perspective
by Shelley Cohen Konrad
Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2019

You might speak with other staff members and find out that they have observed similar behaviors with other children.

“Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology: Integrating Diversity With Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods” by Donna M. Mertens
from Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology: Integrating Diversity With Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods
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Working behaviour: Be clear with your children about exactly how they should approach their work.

“Getting the Buggers to Behave” by Sue Cowley
from Getting the Buggers to Behave
by Sue Cowley
Continuum, 2006

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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