Whenever Your Child Does not Worry About Effects

 

What To Do When Your Child Throws A Temper Tantrum

Video taken from the channel: Live On Purpose TV


 

How To Get Kids To Listen Without Yelling

Video taken from the channel: Live On Purpose TV


 

Providing Care for Medical Patients with Psychiatric Issues: Non-Compliance in Children

Video taken from the channel: BJC HealthCare


 

Kids & Consequences: 5 Questions To Ask Before Rescuing Your Child

Video taken from the channel: Julie de Azevedo Hanks, PhD, LCSW


 

What To Do When Your Child Hits You

Video taken from the channel: Live On Purpose TV


 

Do Children Suffer the Consequences for Parents’ Sin?

Video taken from the channel: The 700 Club


 

What To Do When Kids Don’t Listen

Video taken from the channel: Live On Purpose TV


When Your Child Doesn’t Care About Consequences 1. Does He Really Not Care? A child might say, “I don’t care,” when a parent takes away his cellphone because he doesn’t 2. Are You Using the Right Type of Consequences? If your consequences don’t change her behavior, think carefully about 3. Is. Parenting is difficult under any circumstances. Raising children in most environments brings up issues.

However, the challenges of parenting are amplified when it appears that your child is not worried about the consequences of their actions. When we grew up, consequences were the one way that our parents disciplined us. What to Do if a Child Won’t Respond to Rules or Consequences Parenting tips to help gain cooperation from a previously non-compliant child.

Posted Aug 29, 2018. If chosen well, sometime consequences can help your child learn and make better behavior choices. Other times, consequences can actually make things worse. The wrong kind of consequences just don’t motivate children to behave well.

Your child might actually feel discouraged or so frustrated that their beahvior gets worse instead of better. If the kid doesn’t care about a punishment, it’s the wrong punishment. But more severe does not necessarily mean more effective. Some children don’t respond to traditional punishment for kids. Some parents might be tempted to.

What a great lesson it would be, if you could really allow him to be in charge of this behavior, with your full encouragement, and then see what he would learn from it. The trick is that you must not taunt him, blame him, shame him, discourage him, or piggyback on the natural consequence. The withdrawal or granting of a privilege should give your child an incentive to follow the rules of your house, even when they don’t agree with those rules.

An effective consequence is a privilege your child is interested in. For some kids, video games are a powerful motivator, while other kids could care less about them. Here are some tips for issuing consequences to teens that (supposedly) “don’t care” about consequences: 1. Be assertive without yelling or losing your temper.

A willful teenager is likely to think it’s funny to see you losing your cool. The mom told me she tried working with another professional and this professional said, “Your child is un-coachable because nothing motivates them.” Now, if you have a child who appears to be unmotivated, not care about consequences, or just woefully ambivalent, this may not sound so “crazy” to you. I know it has to be really frustrating to deal with a child that doesn’t care, and doesn’t think about his actions first.

Though most children don’t, but conduct disorder is usually a part of a form of mental illness, and behavior therapy is part of the treatment. Ask if there are support groups for parents with children of this disorder.

List of related literature:

The child should be encouraged to be independent in selfcare activities, especially if the visual loss may be prolonged or potentially permanent.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Rather than threatening the child with vague, dire consequences (“You’re going to be sorry you did that”), when-then commands should be given (“When you’ve laid the table, then you can watch TV”).

“Rutter's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry” by Sir Michael J. Rutter, Sir Dorothy Bishop, Sir Daniel Pine, Sir Stephen Scott, Sir Jim S. Stevenson, Sir Eric A. Taylor, Sir Anita Thapar
from Rutter’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
by Sir Michael J. Rutter, Sir Dorothy Bishop, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

They may be upset about missing work or afraid about paying the ED or ambulance bill, confused about the nature or source of the child’s symptoms, or angry about the child’s risky or oppositional behaviors or about the delays in the ED evaluation.

“Lewis's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: A Comprehensive Textbook” by Andrés Martin, Fred R. Volkmar, Michael H. Bloch
from Lewis’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: A Comprehensive Textbook
by Andrés Martin, Fred R. Volkmar, Michael H. Bloch
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2017

The child doesn’t really like being out of control anyway, and will appreciate the care and attention you a re paying to him.

“Soul Psychology: How to Clear Negative Emotions and Spiritualize Your Life” by Joshua David Stone, Ph.D.
from Soul Psychology: How to Clear Negative Emotions and Spiritualize Your Life
by Joshua David Stone, Ph.D.
Random House Publishing Group, 2010

If the toddler is punished for accidents and made to feel worthless, he or she develops a sense of shame and doubt.

“Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion” by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
from Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion
by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

Restraining the child from mastering motor development can bring more serious long-term problems than allowing the behavior.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Once you stop enabling, your child will have to take greater personal responsibility for her own behavior.

“Pause and Reset: A Parent's Guide to Preventing and Overcoming Problems with Gaming” by Nancy M. Petry
from Pause and Reset: A Parent’s Guide to Preventing and Overcoming Problems with Gaming
by Nancy M. Petry
Oxford University Press, 2019

The child will feel, “What I am doing is okay,” “My castlebuilding behavior is acceptable,” “Mother accepts me doing what I am doing as of now.”

“Parent Effectiveness Training: The Proven Program for Raising Responsible Children” by Dr. Thomas Gordon
from Parent Effectiveness Training: The Proven Program for Raising Responsible Children
by Dr. Thomas Gordon
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2008

Guiding the child in ways to handle issues for the next time is beneficial.

“Inclusive Early Childhood Education: Development, Resources, and Practice” by Penny Deiner
from Inclusive Early Childhood Education: Development, Resources, and Practice
by Penny Deiner
Cengage Learning, 2012

Natural consequences help your child learn a lesson especially well because she will usually care about the consequences.

“10 Days to a Less Defiant Child, second edition: The Breakthrough Program for Overcoming Your Child's Difficult Behavior” by Jeffrey Bernstein
from 10 Days to a Less Defiant Child, second edition: The Breakthrough Program for Overcoming Your Child’s Difficult Behavior
by Jeffrey Bernstein
Hachette Books, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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14 comments

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  • Positive parenting is nice…. but when you have a kid that brags about trying to steal a car and killing a chipmunk do you really think positive thinking will help? I doubt it

  • Staying calm and ignoring the outbursts always the best way to handle the situation. At the same time we must run to engage them in other activities. If they need comfort then as a parent it’s always best to do the needful as the kid might be hungry or tired.

  • Hi Dr Paul, garbage to gold I’ve a 3 year old boy who I confiscate his toys when he doesn’t obey. He gets upset which is normal but he also says that’s fine dad’s cleaning up for me. Which isn’t the reaction I was expecting from this little guy. Am I doing something wrong? He knows why he’s getting consequences to his acts. I was hoping it’d encourage him to listen to my instructions…

  • X.X too bad my kid gets evvvverything she wants from her grandma for ziplock bag strategy to work i feel but i will still try it thanks

  • I love HOW you deliver your messages too! your facial expressions, your smile, you talk to us like you are our best friend and I love that, I really feel like we all are a team!

  • Is there a video explaining what it means to love a child? I’m a very unemotional person. I have teen step children. I had a hard up bringing. I’m not very good at showing my feelings. How does one “show” they love a child?

  • My husband just got custody of he’s granddaughter!! She’s 7!! She’s pretty good!! She just drives me crazy!! My kids are grown!! Im too old to raising any kids!! It’s just a mess!!!!

  • But Dr please make a spicific Vedio about teenagers nowadays how played the whloe day spcialy in holidays with ONLINE game on their own laptops.. and put their headphones and don’t even hear me..and if they hear me they don’t listen to me.. and don’t obey. They dont help me at home in any thing..only when I started yelling..Tell me what should I do with them?I’m very tired of that..please help me and give me an advice..u said loved them…I do…But how cuold they feel my love either..while they r not connected with me?and thank u so much for ur amaizing videos.

  • I can´t watch these videos and just listen; I have to take notes. Thank you! I am not a parent yet, but as a teacher, this is so helpful ^_^

  • I love your videos, you are the first YouTube channel I subscribed. My daughter is three years old, every time I tell her not to this and that, and she said ok. Then she goes do things that I just told her not do.

  • All points correct. But doesn’t work to/with a child with parental alienation that changes personalities, effects/affects and behaviours that are or say one thing to one parent, but on occasions th target parent, when child has been coached/plan on occasions to what alienating parent says or what they think the alienated parent wants to do or say, even if effects/affects the targeted parent, but they are emotionallly bound/manipulated to the alienating parent. I might be an amazing person. But listern or don’t hear (or visa versa) when they say or acknowlege what you say, to make you happy or situation when with you, short term, but go back and behave the way they do/are with the alienting parent, master/slave relationship, or the one they think that pulls thier strings or general environment, as even with 50/50 contact and positvie can not overcome an alenating parent, a narcissist…

  • I want to show empathy and enforce consequences… but then that’s all I do for every meltdown all day. They dont stay with the consequence, or they need me all the time to help them get through it…

  • So what do you do when your fiance fights with you about discipline. He wants me to disipline more when i dont we argue. There are deeper problems going on but agreeing about displine is one of the biggest.

  • When you yell at your children, they see a deformed face. Therefore, you become the monster and they become afraid. #relationshipstuff101