What’s Yes Parenting

 

The 1st Yes in Yes Parenting is…

Video taken from the channel: Bea Marshall


 

Yes Parenting thoughts and reflections

Video taken from the channel: Bea Marshall


 

Talking about Yes Parenting on ITV Lorraine

Video taken from the channel: Bea Marshall


 

Sneak Peek Yes Parenting Digital Pack: What is Yes Parenting?

Video taken from the channel: Bea Marshall


 

Yes Parenting Top Tips #1

Video taken from the channel: Bea Marshall


 

An introduction to Yes Parenting For Happy Families

Video taken from the channel: Bea Marshall


 

Parenting: How to Raise a Child? | Being a Parent | Raising Kids | Sadhguru | Adiyogi

Video taken from the channel: Adiyogi


At least if I understand “Yes parenting” right. It is not about never saying no. It is about not forcing your way of thinking, your way of living and your instant reaction to the child. I remember very few times that my parents said “no” to me, about something that concerned only me and not them as.

Parenting or child rearing is the process of promoting and supporting the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of a child from infancy to adulthood. Parenting refers to the intricacies of raising a child and not exclusively for a biological relationship. Parents may find the Four C’s to be a helpful acronym: care (showing acceptance and affection), consistency (maintaining a stable environment), choices (allowing the child to develop autonomy.

Yes-Brain parenting is not about being permissive. It’s about knowing how to skillfully create structure and learning in your child’s life so that the child comes to their inner and outer. There’s nothing more basic to parenting than the act of feeding your child.But even while breast-feeding, there are decisions to be made.(Yes, breast-feeding mothers should eat spicy food if. Yes, Parenting IS the Hardest Job.

Parenting is the hardest job you’ll EVER have. I repeatedly heard folks say this before I had my first child. I had no earthly idea what they meant. By. Each parenting style varies in at least four areas: discipline style, communication, nurturance, and expectations.

Baumrind Parenting Styles: Four Types of Parenting Authoritarian Parenting. Authoritarian parents are often thought of as disciplinarians. They use a strict discipline style with little negotiation possible.

Punishment is common. Stress Yes, Overprotective Parenting Harms Kids If healthy and happy is the goal, there is such a thing as too much safety. Posted Aug 28, 2016. Parenting isn’t only a collection of skills, rules, and tricks of the trade. It’s who you are, what your family culture is, and how you transmit the most personal aspects of your values to your child.

Enmeshed parenting is different from involved parenting. Involved parenting is healthy for a child and helps to develop confidence, competence, autonomy and self-identity. But healthy relationships are also characterized by respect for the individual’s independent life choices, along with a belief in his or her abilities.

List of related literature:

An automatic “yes” for anything requested can set the stage for expectations and rigid routines that can be hard to break later, but sometimes in the beginning you need to try for as many “yes” responses as possible so the child is motivated to continue using the system.

“Childhood Speech, Language, and Listening Problems” by Patricia McAleer Hamaguchi
from Childhood Speech, Language, and Listening Problems
by Patricia McAleer Hamaguchi
Wiley, 2010

We support the use of a research-based parenting style (called authoritative parenting), characterized by a combination of warmth and limit-setting, that applies well to managing screen-time challenges at home.

“Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World” by Mike Brooks, Jon Lasser
from Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World
by Mike Brooks, Jon Lasser
Oxford University Press, 2018

A child still needs direct supervision and immediate responses (“yes” or “no”) to his answers.

“Adventures in Phonics: Level A” by Florence Lindstrom
from Adventures in Phonics: Level A
by Florence Lindstrom
Christian Liberty Press, 1993

Using answers from a series of yes/ no questions, the assessment identifies the pool of activities that the child cannot do.

“Evidence-Based Treatment for Children with Autism: The CARD Model” by Doreen Granpeesheh, Jonathan Tarbox, Adel C. Najdowski, Julie Kornack
from Evidence-Based Treatment for Children with Autism: The CARD Model
by Doreen Granpeesheh, Jonathan Tarbox, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2014

• Education, Health and Care (EHC) assessment and plans If there is ongoing concern about a child, a request can be made for an Education, Health and Care assessment.

“Child Development for Early Years Students and Practitioners” by Sally Neaum
from Child Development for Early Years Students and Practitioners
by Sally Neaum
SAGE Publications, 2019

MIMI E. LYSTER, CHILD CUSTODY: BUILDING AGREEMENTS THAT WORK (1995) (practical guide for divorcing parents; includes self-administered questionnaires that may be useful in facilitating and structuring data gathering).

“Psychological Evaluations for the Courts, Fourth Edition: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals and Lawyers” by Gary B. Melton, John Petrila, Norman G. Poythress, Christopher Slobogin, Randy K. Otto, Douglas Mossman, Lois O. Condie
from Psychological Evaluations for the Courts, Fourth Edition: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals and Lawyers
by Gary B. Melton, John Petrila, et. al.
Guilford Publications, 2017

The authors report that these items were integrated into the checklist in order to avoid yes or no favoritism by allowing all parents to answer “yes” to various items (Baron-Cohen et al., 1992).

“International Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders” by Johnny L. Matson, Peter Sturmey
from International Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders
by Johnny L. Matson, Peter Sturmey
Springer New York, 2011

It is the responsibility of every parent and guardian to see that the policies outlined in the handbook are followed and that the form in the back is signed and returned.

“Habits of a Successful Band Director: Pitfalls and Solutions” by Scott Rush, Tim Lautzenheiser
from Habits of a Successful Band Director: Pitfalls and Solutions
by Scott Rush, Tim Lautzenheiser
GIA Publications, 2006

The purpose of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL 6–18; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) is to quickly collect standardized ratings on a broad spectrum of competencies and problems for children aged 6 to 18 years as reported by the child’s parent or others that are involved with the child within the home environment.

“Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals, Volume 1” by Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology Cecil R Reynolds, PhD, Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen, Ed.D., NCSP
from Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals, Volume 1
by Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology Cecil R Reynolds, PhD, Cecil R. Reynolds, et. al.
Wiley, 2007

The MCHAT-R/F is a 20-item, parent-report screener and a brief follow-up interview designed for use in well-child care settings.

“Handbook of Infant Mental Health, Fourth Edition” by Charles H. Zeanah
from Handbook of Infant Mental Health, Fourth Edition
by Charles H. Zeanah
Guilford Publications, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • I believe her parenting is quite reasonable. like she said, she doesn’t always say yes to her sons, she says yes reasonably. let the children grow up as themselves. rules and regulation create defiant children. But you still have major rules. the rules that are serious and need to be put into place. while the unnecessary ones are the ones that create this defiant child. Shes a great mom to me. also she will have a great relationship with her kids when they become teens, where as i have no relationship with my mom because she is so unreasonable with all her rules. give them space and when they mess up take the rights away and tell them why. if they do goood. they can earn it back. simple and great parenting SHE IS A AWESOME MOM!!!

  • I think she’s fabulous!  She tries to meet their needs/wants and her children are learning to do the same thing!  They will grow up really well adjusted I think, the only concern I have is how her children will deal with people who are not really cooperative or nice, ie bullies and the like.  Other than that, why not?  Some people need to do more listening to their children and stop thinking that Their Needs are more important than their children’s all the time!  It’s not like they don’t have boundaries, she just doesn’t need to apply them due to her approach! Fabulous!