Therapy Dogs for kids With Learning Disabilities

 

The Benefits of Animal Assisted Therapy for Psychiatric Patients

Video taken from the channel: Northwell Health


 

Introducing dogs for kids with disabilities

Video taken from the channel: The House of Wellness


 

Therapy Dogs Are Helping Kids With Trauma Feel Calm Enough To Tell Their Stories

Video taken from the channel: OnlyGood TV


 

How dogs are helping children with learning difficulties

Video taken from the channel: BU BUzz


 

Pet-Assisted Therapy at Children’s Health

Video taken from the channel: Children’s Health


 

Ukrainian Summer Camp Uses Therapy Dogs to Help Kids With Disabilities

Video taken from the channel: UATV English


 

Dogs Help Children with Learning Disabilities

Video taken from the channel: Uzoo


Therapy dogs provide comfort and assistance to those who have illnesses, anxiety, and disabilities. 1. Therapy dogs are dogs whose purpose is to provide comfort. At nursing homes, for example, therapy dogs may come in and provide affection to the residents. They have also helped out at hospitals, 2  schools, disaster sites, and with people with learning difficulties and developmental disabilities. According to the Service Animal Association, a service dog works to help the owner perform tasks they cannot perform on their own because of their disability, an emotional support animal works to improve the health of their owner who is disabled, and the therapy animal works with their owner to improve the health of others.

Therapy dogs are being used to support children with social and emotional learning needs, which in turn can assist with literacy development. Research into the effects of therapy dogs in schools is showing a range of benefits including: increase in school attendance. The tactile stimulation of stroking or brushing therapy animals can help children with issues like cerebral palsy to develop their fine motor skills in a similar way to physiotherapy activities.

Additionally, children with gross motor issues can benefit from the regular exercise of walking a dog. Official site for Dogs for Kids with Disabilities, a non for profit that raises and trains assistance dogs and therapy dogs to help children with autism. One small study found that kids with ADHD did better in therapy when a therapy dog was part of the session. The dogs seemed to calm down the kids, lower their stress levels and help “prime” them for therapy. (Therapy dogs are specially trained for this.) But just having a pet around the house can also be good for kids with ADHD.

This is where therapy animals could benefit children and help them develop the necessary skills. Animal-Assisted Therapy or Activities aim to achieve this in a goal-directed manner where objectives are set, measured and evaluated. Therapy Dogs for Children With Learning Disabilities. Retrieved from Verywell Family: https://www. Any friendly breed of dog can be considered a therapy dog with a bit of training.

Larger breeds like golden retrievers, standard poodles, St. Bernards, and Labradors are commonly used as therapy dogs. But smaller breeds like mini poodles and Pomeranians are good choices when the dog and the patient are sharing a small space. Our service dogs are trained to help individuals who have a wide range of disabilities. CPL trains service dogs to assist individuals who have mobility impairments, balance disorders, difficulty using their hands/arms, health-related fatigue issues, people with seizure/cardiac syncope and diabetes/ blood pressure disorders. Therapy dog breeds are also useful for children who have autism and various learning disabilities.

Essentially, the job of a therapy dog entails providing emotional support, relieving stress, and brightening lives of humans in need. The service that these dogs provide is extraordinary and important.

List of related literature:

We believe that if staff and therapy dogs are prepared in advance to implement the P.A.C.K. program, children with ADHD can be safely integrated and the welfare of the therapy dogs can be monitored.

“Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Foundations and Guidelines for Animal-Assisted Interventions” by Aubrey H. Fine
from Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Foundations and Guidelines for Animal-Assisted Interventions
by Aubrey H. Fine
Elsevier Science, 2019

NEADS offers a wide spectrum of assistance dog services, including Service Dogs for adults and children with a physical disability, Service Dogs for veterans, Hearing Dogs, and Social Dogs for children on the autism spectrum.

“Rescue and Jessica: A Life-Changing Friendship” by Jessica Kensky, Patrick Downes, Scott Magoon
from Rescue and Jessica: A Life-Changing Friendship
by Jessica Kensky, Patrick Downes, Scott Magoon
Candlewick Press, 2018

Typically these programs involve providing children the opportunity to practice their reading skills, often in classrooms or libraries, by reading to certified therapy dogs, or dogs specifically trained to be reading assistance dogs.

“Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Foundations and Guidelines for Animal-Assisted Interventions” by Aubrey H. Fine
from Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Foundations and Guidelines for Animal-Assisted Interventions
by Aubrey H. Fine
Elsevier Science, 2015

Psychologist and counselor Lea Devčić had been showing me some of the ways dogs have been helping children with their reading and numbers skills, days of the week, months, seasons, colors, and even coordination, empathy, recognizing emotions, and overcoming sensory issues.

“Doctor Dogs: How Our Best Friends Are Becoming Our Best Medicine” by Maria Goodavage
from Doctor Dogs: How Our Best Friends Are Becoming Our Best Medicine
by Maria Goodavage
Penguin Publishing Group, 2019

The service animal can provide emotional comfort and safety for the child, as well as serving as a transitional multi-sensory stimulus which can aid in the sensory and affective levels of the ASD children, as the authors elaborated on earlier.

“Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Theoretical Foundations and Guidelines for Practice” by Aubrey H. Fine
from Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Theoretical Foundations and Guidelines for Practice
by Aubrey H. Fine
Elsevier Science, 2010

For example, therapy jobs requiring close human contact might be better for dogs with a higher preference for praise.

“Real World Psychology” by Catherine A. Sanderson, Karen Huffman
from Real World Psychology
by Catherine A. Sanderson, Karen Huffman
Wiley, 2019

Service dogs that resemble Seeing Eye dogs are often invaluable to autistic children and adults, helping to stave off panic attacks, provide physical orientation, and build an emotional bridge between autistic people and the social world.

“Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity” by Andrew Solomon
from Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity
by Andrew Solomon
Scribner, 2012

Ultimately, the goal of dog behavior therapy, as well as preventive training, is to reduce the risk of CDA by taking appropriate safety precautions and promoting a more playful and trusting bond between the dog and family members.

“Handbook of Applied Dog Behavior and Training, Procedures and Protocols” by Steven R. Lindsay
from Handbook of Applied Dog Behavior and Training, Procedures and Protocols
by Steven R. Lindsay
Wiley, 2013

Therapy dogs can be used in classrooms and libraries to foster a love of reading.

“Hello Goodbye Dog” by Maria Gianferrari, Patrice Barton
from Hello Goodbye Dog
by Maria Gianferrari, Patrice Barton
Roaring Brook Press, 2017

Perhaps instead of a therapy dog, the control patients could be given a plant to care for or perhaps some new books to read.

“Practitioner's Guide to Using Research for Evidence-Based Practice” by Allen Rubin, Jennifer Bellamy
from Practitioner’s Guide to Using Research for Evidence-Based Practice
by Allen Rubin, Jennifer Bellamy
Wiley, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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