Therapy and repair Creatures for kids With Special Needs

 

How animals are therapeutic for special needs kids!

Video taken from the channel: Sasha’s Special Channel


 

Service Animals for Children with Special Needs

Video taken from the channel: Jaidyn McKeever-Harrison


 

Service Dog In Training With Special Needs Children

Video taken from the channel: Raising_Liberty


 

Boy With Autism Gets Dog Who Changes His Life | The Dodo

Video taken from the channel: The Dodo


 

Austin hospital therapy dog helps kids with special needs

Video taken from the channel: KVUE


 

Service Dogs and Invisible Disabilities | Sarah Meikle | TEDxDeerfield

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


 

How a service dog transformed daily life for a boy with autism

Video taken from the channel: Local Love Magazine


Service and therapy animals have become increasingly popular for children with special needs, and for good reason. Research shows that animals can make a huge difference in kids’ physical independence and emotional well-being. Service and therapy animals are proven to make a positive difference Very Well Family – May 22, 2018 Service and therapy animals have become increasingly popular for children with special needs, and for good reason. Research shows that animals can make a huge difference in kids’ physical independence and emotional well-being.

Therapy and service/assistance animals, such as dogs and horses, provide remarkable, long-lasting benefits for children with special needs or disabilities in so many ways. Bionic Therapy Animals Therapy animals with prosthetics and other mobility devices help children and adults adjust to a new way of life. Therapy dogs can provide comfort to those who are ill or help to soothe a child who is anxiously struggling to read.

6  Service dogs and animals also exist to assist people with disabilities but have different training criteria than therapy dogs. Service animals are specifically trained to perform tasks for someone with a disability. Insight into the benefits and practicalities of service assistance and therapy dogs for families with children who have physical disabilities. These dogs can be a joy and a wonderful asset for children with disabilities, but the reality may be more complicated than you expect.

Dolphin assisted therapy (DAT) is another popular animal assisted therapy choice for children and adults with cerebral palsy, intellectual and developmental disabilities, and other special needs. The use of pets – dogs, mostly, but also a few cats – in therapy goes back only to the 1960s. Today, pets are used to ease anxiety in hospital settings, help children who are anxious about learning to read, and for a number of other calming and esteem-building therapies for special needs children and adults. Studies of animal therapy have shown repeatedly that exposure to. Providing Service Dogs to Children Worldwide 4 Paws for Ability enriches the lives of children with disabilities by training and placing quality, task-trained service dogs.

This provides increased independence for the children, and assistance to their families. Animals play key role for kids with special needs It may come as no surprise that animals have an increasing presence in therapeutic care for kids with disabilities. After all, most of us have experienced our own form of animal therapy: Cuddle a baby kitten and all seems right.

We provide equine assisted activities, summer camps and therapies (including Therapeutic Riding, Horsemanship and Equine Assisted Learning) to individuals with special needs, ages 4 years old and up. Horses provide a special format for children to connect and socialize with the animal and each other. (937) 935-6545.

List of related literature:

For those clinicians who serve a population of children and adults with ASD, they may consider learning more about resources in their community that could help provide opportunities for the families outside the therapeutic environment (e.g. equine therapy, service animals, etc.).

“Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Theoretical Foundations and Guidelines for Practice” by Aubrey H. Fine
from Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Theoretical Foundations and Guidelines for Practice
by Aubrey H. Fine
Elsevier Science, 2010

For those clinicians who serve a population of children and adults with ASD, they may consider learning more about resources in their community that could help provide opportunities for AAI outside of the traditional therapeutic environment (e.g., equine therapy, service animals).

“Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Foundations and Guidelines for Animal-Assisted Interventions” by Aubrey H. Fine
from Handbook on Animal-Assisted Therapy: Foundations and Guidelines for Animal-Assisted Interventions
by Aubrey H. Fine
Elsevier Science, 2015

Psychologists, liaison nurses, social workers, recreational therapists, and community workers and leaders support the patient and family’s needs and help the school and community understand the disabled person’s special problems and concerns.

“AAOS Atlas of Orthoses and Assistive Devices E-Book” by John D. Hsu, John Michael, John Fisk
from AAOS Atlas of Orthoses and Assistive Devices E-Book
by John D. Hsu, John Michael, John Fisk
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Research in occupational science has also shown that parents of children with disabilities may choose to allow children to perform occupations that therapists ask to discontinue because those occupations may “nourish” their children’s sensory needs (Blanche, 2001).

“Occupational Therapy Models for Intervention with Children and Families” by Sandra Barker Dunbar
from Occupational Therapy Models for Intervention with Children and Families
by Sandra Barker Dunbar
SLACK, 2007

Many facilities have policies that allow visits from service animals (an animal that is trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability) and animal­assisted activities such as pet therapy.

“Risk Management Handbook for Health Care Organizations, Set” by Roberta Carroll, American Society for Healthcare Risk Management (ASHRM)
from Risk Management Handbook for Health Care Organizations, Set
by Roberta Carroll, American Society for Healthcare Risk Management (ASHRM)
Wiley, 2011

The special services available to the children through the National Health Service include speech therapy, physiotherapy, psychomotor therapy, psychology, and social services.

“The Hundred Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia Experience in Transformation, 3rd Edition: The Reggio Emilia Experience in Transformation” by Carolyn Edwards, Lella Gandini, George Forman
from The Hundred Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia Experience in Transformation, 3rd Edition: The Reggio Emilia Experience in Transformation
by Carolyn Edwards, Lella Gandini, George Forman
ABC-CLIO, 2011

Children with ASD may benefit from additional services outside of the school system (e.g., speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, or social skills training).

“Interprofessional Care Coordination for Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorder: Translating Research into Practice” by Maryellen Brunson McClain, Jeffrey D. Shahidullah, Katherine R. Mezher
from Interprofessional Care Coordination for Pediatric Autism Spectrum Disorder: Translating Research into Practice
by Maryellen Brunson McClain, Jeffrey D. Shahidullah, Katherine R. Mezher
Springer International Publishing, 2020

Occupational therapists provide services at neighborhood pools, consulting with swimming instructors, and collaborate with librarians to create storytime sessions for young children with autism.

“Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents E-Book” by Jane Case-Smith, Jane Clifford O'Brien
from Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents E-Book
by Jane Case-Smith, Jane Clifford O’Brien
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Students with physical disabilities, health impairments and severe disabilities need the services of an interdisciplinary team composed of the special and regular teachers and school administrators, parents, physical and occupational therapists, medical personnel, specialists, psychologists and guidance counselors.

“Introduction to Special Education' 2007 Ed.” by Inciong, Et Al
from Introduction to Special Education’ 2007 Ed.
by Inciong, Et Al
Rex Book Store, 2007

Because each community is unique, therapists must work with local agencies (e.g., local councils on aging, area agencies for aging, public transport) as well as national agencies (e.g., National Center for Senior Transportation, AARP, Veteran’s Administration) to develop a specific list to guide clients and caregivers.

“Stroke Rehabilitation: A Function-Based Approach” by Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA
from Stroke Rehabilitation: A Function-Based Approach
by Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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12 comments

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  • I’m thinking bout a service dog, I have M.S. but symptoms are not visible(dizzyness, emotional at times, etc.) I really want a little service do because I’m little 4’11. An I’m allergic to dogs so I would have to get a poodle but do they come as small service dogs??

  • Please help me I was run over by a truck two years ago and I can barely walk and talk please bring me out of my shell and give my son his dad back it’s hurts my heart that he said to me daddy you don’t play with me anymore did I do something wrong with tears in my eyes I told him he didn’t do anything wrong it broke my heart

  • I have a great respect for service dogs and what they do. What I have a problem with is people abusing this super great program. I know a friend that is epileptic, and you would never know. She has a service dog maggie. Which I only pet when she says its ok. But once she puts on her vest to go outside I never touch or communicate with maggie she is working. But my friend says she hates people that claim to have service dogs yet you can tell these dogs are not trained. Or as my friend said these animals are not trained as service animals.

  • My family’s first dog was because my little brother was having night terrors, and she became the family dog ever since… man I miss Buddy Girl…

  • I remember watching this in my psychology class and I remember how people were staring at me, silently judging me because I have a service dog

  • Thank you.. with tears in my eyes and a emotional feeling in the rest,I wished i had the same chance to eased my mind. I’m very glad he’s has the luck with such good parents. Lots of love to this whole family from the bottom of my heart.you really made a big difference,more then you know. ❤️

  • As an autistic person I think I can kinda explain the pressure thing. A lot of autistic people find non-human pressure applied to them to be calming ( unless it’s too restrain them in some way ), I myself I like thick blankets as do other autistic people. I like to use them even in the summer but have to take it off at some point as it gets to hot. Having pressure on you is sorta like a hug, except we don’t really like to be hugged, so having pressure put on us is a good replacement. It’s comforting and calming. Hugs from people just aren’t like that, they feel uncomfortable. Don’t ask me why they just do. I’ve reached a point where I’m somewhat okay with hugs and some people don’t ever reach that point and that’s okay. I don’t have nightmares but I feel like I sleep easier when I have my dog daisy snuggling with me.

  • What a great idea. The dog is like a blanket he can use a sensory toy and it actually responds to him to calm him! So many dogs out there that are in shelters that could be used to help special needs children and adults for this purpose!

  • Dogs have a bigger heart and are smarter then most / all people
    I can say that beings I’ve lost everyone /everything after my injury’s except my dog

  • I was made to get rid of my dog because at the apartment where I live were scared of her because she is big. I am disabled. Also in fear for my life because of reasons I can not put on here. I have her at my friends and tried to find a place to live but the recommendation from where I live now (for 6 yrs) said aggressive dog complaints. Any one have any ideas on what I can do to get my dog back home with me. I already have a letter from my Dr. that didn’t help. The management said I would be evicted.

  • I’m so happy with how she said this. I have a medical alert/ response and psychiatric service dog. And he has given me my independence that a person needs

  • I have seizures and ptsd, my dogs help me through both.. they can tell when I’m going down, or going to have a panic attack, they lay on me until it’s over. They protect me, and comfort me. They love us unconditionally.