The Way Your Kid Could be a Self-Trained Readers

 

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A self-taught reader, also known as a spontaneous reader, is a child who has figured out how to read without any formal reading instruction, thereby breaking the code. The code is the alphabet as a symbol system of sounds and words. A child first realizes that letters represent sounds and that together letters represent words.

Each child knows exactly what his or her own learning style is, knows exactly what he or she is ready for, and will learn to read in his or her own unique way, at his or her unique schedule. Fill your house with them. When books your child likes are readily available, they’ll read more often. And when it comes to reading, quantity certainly matters.

The more your child reads, the better they’ll get, and the more they’ll learn to love it. Reading with your child is the most important thing parents can do to make their child a better reader. When the child is a few months old; start with picture books.

Point to a picture and say the word aloud. As the baby grows older, point to the same picture and ask her/him to identify them. 1. Reward your child for reading. If you promise your child twenty, uninterrupted minutes on his or her Nintendo 3DS or on the computer after twenty minutes of reading for pleasure, you can bet that your child will give reading a try, even if the reading material seems too difficult. Here are 10 simple steps to teach your child to read at home: 1. Use songs and nursery rhymes to build phonemic awareness Children’s songs and nursery rhymes aren’t just a lot of fun—the rhyme and rhythm help kids to hear the sounds and syllables in words, which helps them learn to read.

I think it might depend on your definition of ‘self-taught’. My 4 year old DS can read, and he is not yet at school. He has been recognizing symbols and words since he was 18 months 2 years old. Teaching your child the alphabet will help her learn to recognize letters and sound them out so that they can later build them together to make words. Use tactile learning tools.

Buy a set of 3 in (7.6 cm) foam letters and/or blocks with letters of the alphabet to play with. As your child plays, tell them what each letter sounds like. Self teaching or self learning allows children to get at the books themselves without an interpreter, a teacher. The public school model of education assumes that a teacher is necessary to spoon-feed information into the heads of the students and then give tests and quizzes to.

In a rich environment full of words, people who read, being read to, having questions answered, words being fun, interesting and useful, children learn to.

List of related literature:

Many parents appreciate specific advice on how to help their child become a successful reader.

“Literacy Assessment and Intervention for Classroom Teachers” by Beverly DeVries
from Literacy Assessment and Intervention for Classroom Teachers
by Beverly DeVries
Taylor & Francis, 2017

If the child is a strong reader, he can read back written directions several times or study the stories at home to help the information sink in.

“Childhood Speech, Language, and Listening Problems” by Patricia McAleer Hamaguchi
from Childhood Speech, Language, and Listening Problems
by Patricia McAleer Hamaguchi
Wiley, 2010

Research on reading indicates that all but a very small number of children can learn to read proficiently, though they may learn at different rates and may require different amounts and types of instructional support.

“Adding It Up: Helping Children Learn Mathematics” by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Center for Education, Mathematics Learning Study Committee, Bradford Findell, Jane Swafford, Jeremy Kilpatrick
from Adding It Up: Helping Children Learn Mathematics
by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2001

Children can learn a lot of language and literacy skills when sharing books with an adult: new words, more mature grammar, more accurate or precise speech articulation, phonological awareness, letter-sound associations and word recognition, typical story structures, and predicting and inferencing skills.

“Introduction to Speech Sound Disorders” by Françoise Brosseau-Lapré, Susan Rvachew
from Introduction to Speech Sound Disorders
by Françoise Brosseau-Lapré, Susan Rvachew
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2018

You may easily satisfy his curiosity when he begins to show an interest in reading by following a carefully worked out program of teaching especially suited to individual instruction.

“Let's Read: A Linguistic Approach” by Leonard Bloomfield, Clarence Lewis Barnhart, Leonard Bloomfield, Clarence Lewis Barnhart, Robert C.. Pooley, The Bloomfield System, George P.. Faust
from Let’s Read: A Linguistic Approach
by Leonard Bloomfield, Clarence Lewis Barnhart, Leonard Bloomfield, et. al.
Wayne State University Press, 1961

Reading with a child, talking about the book, and writing and reading Language Experience Books (see Chapter 9) provide valuable opportunities for children to listen, talk, and “write”; these can be used in AV sessions, and parents can learn how to do these literacy activities with their children themselves.

“Auditory-Verbal Therapy: For Young Children with Hearing Loss and Their Families, and the Practitioners Who Guide Them” by Warren Estabrooks, Karen MacIver-Lux, Ellen A. Rhoades
from Auditory-Verbal Therapy: For Young Children with Hearing Loss and Their Families, and the Practitioners Who Guide Them
by Warren Estabrooks, Karen MacIver-Lux, Ellen A. Rhoades
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2016

Although research on reading to children has found this early introduction to literacy to be beneficial on different levels, there is little research available on the relationship between parents’ reading­related knowledge and the influence it has on the reading skills of their children.

“Sociology of Education: An A-to-Z Guide” by James Ainsworth
from Sociology of Education: An A-to-Z Guide
by James Ainsworth
SAGE Publications, 2013

To the extent that parents consider reading to be an important activity or skill, they may provide more encouragement.

“Media Violence and Children: A Complete Guide for Parents and Professionals, 2nd Edition: A Complete Guide for Parents and Professionals” by Douglas A. Gentile
from Media Violence and Children: A Complete Guide for Parents and Professionals, 2nd Edition: A Complete Guide for Parents and Professionals
by Douglas A. Gentile
ABC-CLIO, 2014

They can be summed up in the observation that teaching a small percentage of highly motivated children, most of them the children of literate parents, to read —as was the case a century ago—is a far cry from teaching every child to read, no matter how little motivated he may be, or how deprived his background.

“How to Read a Book” by Mortimer J. Adler, Charles Van Doren
from How to Read a Book
by Mortimer J. Adler, Charles Van Doren
Touchstone, 2011

Children can read many books independently, actively making predictions, visualising, monitoring their understanding and making repairs when necessary.

“Literacy for the 21st Century” by Gail Tompkins, Rod Campbell, David Green, Carol Smith
from Literacy for the 21st Century
by Gail Tompkins, Rod Campbell, et. al.
Pearson Australia, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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18 comments

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  • My little girl and I also took the Step One of this reading manual in 3 months and other three weeks. I observed some changes on the learning ability of my little girl. I keep a lot of money and do not have to enlist my girl in some of the high-priced reading program for youngsters. Research about this reading book on Google. The guidebook’s name is Elena Readoρiz
    nice day

  • It`s already been 1 year since we started out reading tutorial HowToRead.4YourHelp. Com (remove space and open the website) The reading skills of my little girl has consistently developed. She at this time reads beginning books and is also a fantastic speller. She even makes up brief stories and also writes sentences…

  • To raise a reader, read to them…. a lot. Find good books like Henry and Mudge series and soon they will learn sight words and be reading these books happily. Both my kids read by age 4, one birth, one adopted and by 8 were lightyears ahead of kids who waited to read June B in school. The higher quality lit you read to them the faster they learn both English and other languages

  • It`s been 1 year since we started out reading this guide. My little girl is boosting her own learning skills so far. Right now, she can read some textbooks. Not just that, she’s a very good speller as well. What’s even more exciting is she can easily create sentences right now. Get this reading guide by Google. The guidebook’s name is Elena Readoρiz
    nice day

  • I could not agree more. Students should learn from all types of writers. We have excluded science, math, and many other contents from reading in school. I love your smart thinking and the action that you are taking. The misinformed comments below makes me realize how much work we really do have ahead of us in raising up the next generation of adults. We all need to see each other for who we are and want to be as Readers!

  • Lovely Video clip! Apologies for chiming in, I would love your initial thoughts. Have you heard about Millawdon Future Ticket Trick (do a google search)? It is a good exclusive product for teaching children to read without the normal expense. Ive heard some amazing things about it and my GF after many years got cool results with it.

  • You asked to join “advanced english” and got what you wanted, no problem.. and you still call ‘institutionalized racism’. My only outtake is that it’s a culture difference, institutionalized racism would be if you couldn’t join the class…

  • I’m 17 in an urban area and one day I was reading a book on Queen Elizabeth I which is something I’m really interested and my coworker who went to the same school I did said “oh no I could never read that’s mad boring”. So I told her you just need to read something you’re interested in. It gave me a lot of insight as to how teens in urban areas view reading as tedium, rather than something to be enjoyed l. I blame most of this on the Industrializing of Education where schools are more about selling you into a college than learning.

  • all children, as you last line said? Seems a bit of a targeted audience. Single mother homes, are a western cultural problem not a racial issue alone. Feminists have destroyed families and with it we see civilizations once again fall to the insanity.

  • I just lately uncovered this particular reading guide last March. Ever since then, my youngster and I were really commited in adhering to the guide. At this time, my son can now read with out my aid. My little boy feels truly confident and is doing fantastic in Pre-school today.. Research about this reading book by Google. The program’s name is Elena Readoρiz
    nice day

  • Child Reader:

    1. Boosters and rewards after reading

    2. Encouragement and motivation and setting a distinctive goal in life such as a doctor or scientist etc..

    3.Fun and entertaining while reading

    4. Encouraging the writing of daily newspaper pieces

    5. Interested and proficient private teacher or mother and father distinguished in daily education

    My son Mohammed began reading the Koran, although it is difficult to recite at the age of six and a half and began to read small English words
    In your clip I focused on blacks in teaching reading perhaps because they are the hardest hit.

    I think mothers are more busy working than educating their children.

    Thank you

  • Any parents or kids who are working hard to be better at reading I applaud you in my videos of book reviews i most of the time say readers are leaders and so are you so read you are the people proving that��������������!!!

  • I thought that skin color doesn’t matter. After watching this video I finally understood how awfully wrong I was. I found that black boys need special books for black boys. Black boys need black man as their role model. Who knows what else black boys need but it certainly has to be black.

  • My daughter and I also took the Step One of this particular reading guidebook in Three months and also other three weeks. The reading capabilities of my boy have considerably advanced. I save plenty of cash and don`t need to register my young boy in a few of the high-priced reading plan for boy. Research about this reading book by Google. The program’s name is Elena Readoρiz
    nice day

  • But laughter will never make these booger-eaters Steve Jobs, or Elon Musks. Elon Musk had read several encyclopedias from cover to cover, not comics books. This is crazy what you are proposing.

  • Kudos for the Video clip! Apologies for chiming in, I would appreciate your thoughts. Have you researched Millawdon Future Ticket Trick (erm, check it on google should be there)? It is a good one of a kind guide for teaching children to read minus the normal expense. Ive heard some incredible things about it and my GF finally got great results with it.