The Stages and Awareness for Understanding how to Read

 

The Stages of Reading

Video taken from the channel: Parent Lab


 

Stages of Reading Development

Video taken from the channel: angel orange


 

11 of 25 Stages of reading development

Video taken from the channel: Queensland Department of Education


 

The Five Strands of Reading 2015 Master Teacher Training, Part 1

Video taken from the channel: Logic of English


 

Reading effectively a 3-stage lesson guide

Video taken from the channel: Oxford University Press ELT


 

What the Science Says About How Kids Learn to Read

Video taken from the channel: Education Week


 

The basics of learning to read

Video taken from the channel: GreatSchools


Stages of Learning to Read Pre-Alphabetic Phase. At this stage, children recognize and basically remember words by their shapes. Words are Partial Alphabetic Phase.

Children at this stage can memorize printed words by connecting one or more of the letters to Full Alphabetic Phase. In this. For example, the Developmental Stages of Learning to Read, outlines 5 distinct stages: Awareness and Exploration of Reading Stage (pre-K), Emergent Reading Stage (pre-K to early Kindergarten), Early Reading Stage (Kindergarten to Grade 1), Transitional Reading Stage (Grade 1 to Grade 2) and Fluent Reading Stage (Grade 3 and above). More recent research has modified these stages, particularly the early stages. However, Chall’s work is still useful in how we understand learning to read and reading to learn.

The grade levels assigned to the stages relate to typical learners. Developmental Stages of Reading. Stage 0: Prereading, birth to age 6.

The fundamental premise for Learning to Read in order to Read to Learn is that “Learning to Read” occurs during the early years of a child’s education–typically kindergarten through 3rd grade–and consists primarily of decoding and memorizing basic words. The focus is phonemic awareness and phonics. Word recognition and oral language comprehension are not equally important at all stages of reading development. For typical readers, word recognition abilities tend to be especially important in the early stages of learning to read, when children are learning phonics and developing the ability to read common sight words. What starts at this point is referred to in a variety of ways in the literature: independent reading (Holdaway, 1979), the alphabetic principle (Ferreiro and Teberosky, 1982), the alphabetic stage (Frith, 1985), the cipher stage (Gough and Hillinger, 1980), fully or truly productive reading (Perfetti, 1985), and conventional reading (Sulzby, 1994).

Teaching reading can be accomplished by using the first three of the four cognitive stages that psychologist/biologist Jean Piaget developed. The stages suggest that children begin by collecting sensory and motor information, and then gradually organize that information into first symbolic thoughts and then abstract ones. Reading | Phonemic awareness | Linguistic skill | Phonemic awareness and learning to read | Acquiring phonemic awareness | Not acquiring phonemic awareness | Related Resources & Products. Phonemic awareness is a critical skill for learning to read an alphabetically written language.

Yet a fair amount of confusion, especially among educators, persists about. Like other skills that children acquire, learning to read is a developmental process. The same way that all children learn to talk at different ages, children also progress in their reading at different rates.. Researchers have identified five stages of literacy development that children typically pass through, beginning with an exploration of reading and ending with fluent reading. Learning to read is the acquisition and practice of the skills necessary to understand the meaning behind printed words.For a fairly good reader, the skill of reading should feel simple, effortless, and automatic.

However, the process of learning to read is complex and builds on cognitive, linguistic, and social skills developed from a very early age.

List of related literature:

Once the child moves from the beginning to read stage (which is driven by vocabulary development) to the reading to learn stages (i.e., stage 4 and higher), the demands on reading change dramatically.

“Optometric Management of Learning-related Vision Problems” by Mitchell Scheiman, Michael W. Rouse
from Optometric Management of Learning-related Vision Problems
by Mitchell Scheiman, Michael W. Rouse
Mosby Elsevier, 2006

We have not attempted to identify these stages with particular ages, since children need access to print materials, and some instruction and support (or at the very least modelling) in order to be able to learn to read.

“For the Love of Language: An Introduction to Linguistics” by Kate Burridge, Tonya N. Stebbins
from For the Love of Language: An Introduction to Linguistics
by Kate Burridge, Tonya N. Stebbins
Cambridge University Press, 2019

In the first reading stage, from about the beginning of the first to the middle of second grade, decoding the print, or the processes involved

“Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating” by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury
from Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating
by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

In the second, third, and fourth parts, we present ages and stages of reading, from early childhood literacies to youth literacies to adult academic literacies, and try to account for reading in different social settings.

“Theoretical Models and Processes of Literacy” by Donna E. Alvermann, Norman J. Unrau, Misty Sailors, Robert B. Ruddell
from Theoretical Models and Processes of Literacy
by Donna E. Alvermann, Norman J. Unrau, et. al.
Taylor & Francis, 2018

Now instead of learning to read, the child is reading to learn, able to get new information and derive fuller meaning from print because the decoding process has become well-learned and goes on automatically, below the level of consciousness.

“Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating” by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury, Carolyn Gosse
from Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating
by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury, Carolyn Gosse
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

In most developmental (phase) models, the acquisition of reading begins with a visual stage followed by a linguistic stage.

“Dyslexia in the Foreign Language Classroom” by Joanna Nijakowska
from Dyslexia in the Foreign Language Classroom
by Joanna Nijakowska
Channel View Publications, 2010

This stage is typically the heart of the learning to read process as it covers the first and second grades (ages 6–7) in average children.

“The SAGE Encyclopedia of Human Communication Sciences and Disorders” by Jack S. Damico, Martin J. Ball
from The SAGE Encyclopedia of Human Communication Sciences and Disorders
by Jack S. Damico, Martin J. Ball
SAGE Publications, 2019

Stage 1 Ages 6–7 Initial reading and decoding Level of difficulty of language read by the child is much below that understood when

“Child Development for Child Care and Protection Workers: Second Edition” by Brigid Daniel, Sally Wassell, Robbie Gilligan
from Child Development for Child Care and Protection Workers: Second Edition
by Brigid Daniel, Sally Wassell, Robbie Gilligan
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2011

To stimulate the children’s reading orientation and involvement in reading, interactive storybooks let children activate reading of words, phrases, or pages in any order they want and are typically equipped with sound and animations that are activated by the children (Rani et al. 2015a, b; Reinking and Watkins 2000).

“Proceedings of the Art and Design International Conference (AnDIC 2016)” by Rusmadiah Anwar, Muliyadi Mahamood, D'zul Haimi Md. Zain, Mohamad Kamal Abd Aziz, Oskar Hasdinor Hassan, Shahriman Zainal Abidin
from Proceedings of the Art and Design International Conference (AnDIC 2016)
by Rusmadiah Anwar, Muliyadi Mahamood, et. al.
Springer Singapore, 2018

This contrasts with accounts that see children moving from one distinct stage or phase of reading to another, with each stage or phase being predominately characterised by different processing mechanisms (e.g., Frith, 1985; Ehri, 1992, 1995, 2005).

“Theories of Reading Development” by Kate Cain, Donald L. Compton, Rauno K. Parrila
from Theories of Reading Development
by Kate Cain, Donald L. Compton, Rauno K. Parrila
John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • I’m implementing the insights from this training to teach my children to read. This is thorough and evidence based. Thank you so much for putting this together. I now know how to build the house that is literacy with my children. I wish my board would send its teachers to this training. They are stuck on teaching phonics and sight words. My first child is struggling and his self esteem is taking a battering. Now I have the understanding to rectify this sad state of affairs.

  • Nice Video clip! Forgive me for butting in, I am interested in your initial thoughts. Have you considered Millawdon Future Ticket Trick (Have a quick look on google cant remember the place now)? It is a good one off product for teaching children to read without the hard work. Ive heard some extraordinary things about it and my close friend Aubrey finally got excellent results with it.