The Benefits and drawbacks of having Sole Legal Child custody of a kid

 

Negotiating What is Best for Your Child in Your Child Custody Case

Video taken from the channel: Command the Courtroom


 

Parental Kidnapping | Learn About Law

Video taken from the channel: Business Lounge TV


 

How a Guardian Ad Litem Will Affect Contested Child Custody in Georgia

Video taken from the channel: Atlanta Divorce Law Group


 

The Pros and Cons of Joint Custody: What You Should Know

Video taken from the channel: Verhaeghe Law Office


 

Child Custody Part 1: Important Terms

Video taken from the channel: Maryland Courts


 

What Exactly Is Joint Legal Custody?

Video taken from the channel: UpToParents


 

Making Joint Custody Work

Video taken from the channel: CBS


Here are the pros and cons of sole legal custody. Pros. Reduces conflict because communication is limited. Makes major decisions easier because only one parent is legally responsible.

Creates more consistency and stability for the children. Reduces the need to track down an unavailable parent to make major decisions. Cons. There are downsides to this custody arrangement, as well. Before committing to sole physical custody, consider the following negatives: The children no longer reside with both parents.

One parent gets less time with the child. One parent has a more meaningful relationship with the child. One parent feels less appreciated and needed.

One parent only gets visitation not quality parenting time (only during summer vacation or extended breaks). The benefits of sole custody can be wide-reaching, but there are also disadvantages, particularly to those who do not receive it. For example, a noncustodial parent’s visitation with his or her child may be limited, drastically affecting his or her relationship with his or her child. Child custody is a challenging legal balancing act that puts the best interests of children first. When a parent wants sole legal custody, he or she is assuming the complete responsibility of making major decisions for the child.

This may include subjects such as health car. Pros of sole physical custody include: The child has a home base that is usually the same home the child has been living in. The child can keep a routine and schedule that is similar to before the parents’.

However, there are pros and cons of getting sole child custody. According to Stuart R. Manoff & Associates, P.A., a child support law firm West Palm Beach, there are advantages of getting sole child custody. Children are most likely to benefit from sole custody arrangements when the noncustodial parent is abusive or neglectful, according to child custody evaluator Jonathan W. Gould in his book “The Art and Science of Child Custody Evaluations.” In these cases, sole custody can help keep a child safe and prevent psychological trauma. Here, I want to explain the pros and cons of 50/50 child custody.

If you look at the advantages for children, such as being close to both parents, the arrangement is certainly attractive. The pros of bird’s nest custody. The pros of bird’s nest custody of a child are that the child doesn’t have to move from one home to another during custody exchanges. Rather, the parents simply take turns living in the home where the child lives full-time.

From the child.

List of related literature:

Researchers have found that mothers, fathers, and children usually prefer joint legal custody to sole custody, and joint legal custody can improve family adjustment and cohesiveness.

“Forensic and Legal Psychology” by Mark Costanzo, Daniel Krauss
from Forensic and Legal Psychology
by Mark Costanzo, Daniel Krauss
Worth Publishers, 2010

The struggle is over a position—the demand for sole legal custody of the child—not over ways to meet the real substantive, procedural, psychological/relational interests of each parent.

“The Mediation Process: Practical Strategies for Resolving Conflict” by Christopher W. Moore
from The Mediation Process: Practical Strategies for Resolving Conflict
by Christopher W. Moore
Wiley, 2014

In one small study, couples who chose joint custody differed from those who chose maternal custody in three ways.188 First,the fathers in the former group were more likely to be perceived by both parents as having been actively involved in childrearing.

“Psychological Evaluations for the Courts, Third Edition: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals and Lawyers” by Gary B. Melton, John Petrila, Norman G. Poythress, Christopher Slobogin, Phillip M. Lyons, Jr., Randy K. Otto
from Psychological Evaluations for the Courts, Third Edition: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals and Lawyers
by Gary B. Melton, John Petrila, et. al.
Guilford Publications, 2007

Custody may be parsed into legal custody, relating to the rights and obligations to make major life decisions for the child, such as choice of school or medical care, and physical custody, relating to the rights of the custodian with whom the child resides.

“Principles and Practice of Forensic Psychiatry, Third Edition” by Richard Rosner, Charles Scott
from Principles and Practice of Forensic Psychiatry, Third Edition
by Richard Rosner, Charles Scott
CRC Press, 2017

Again, as with the effects of divorce, the research in this area highlights the difficulty of judging on an individual basis which children will fare better with joint-custody arrangements compared to sole custody.

“Psychological Evaluations for the Courts, Fourth Edition: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals and Lawyers” by Gary B. Melton, John Petrila, Norman G. Poythress, Christopher Slobogin, Randy K. Otto, Douglas Mossman, Lois O. Condie
from Psychological Evaluations for the Courts, Fourth Edition: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals and Lawyers
by Gary B. Melton, John Petrila, et. al.
Guilford Publications, 2017

After divorce, the types of child custody that may be granted by the courts include joint, split, and sole custody; fathers are increasingly being granted joint or sole custody.

“Behavioral Science” by Barbara Fadem
from Behavioral Science
by Barbara Fadem
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

If parents cannot agree on a child custody arrangement, a judge may decide custody on the basis of the best interests of the child.

“Divorce: Causes and Consequences” by Alison Clarke-Stewart, Cornelia Brentano, Professor Cornelia Brentano
from Divorce: Causes and Consequences
by Alison Clarke-Stewart, Cornelia Brentano, Professor Cornelia Brentano
Yale University Press, 2006

Sole or full custody is when a single parent is awarded all rights to make legal decisions for the child, and the noncustodial parent is allowed visitation.

“Shrink Rap: Three Psychiatrists Explain Their Work” by Dinah Miller, Annette Hanson, Steven Roy Daviss
from Shrink Rap: Three Psychiatrists Explain Their Work
by Dinah Miller, Annette Hanson, Steven Roy Daviss
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011

The effects of joint legal custody on mothers, fathers, and children: Controlling for factors that predispose a sole maternal versus joint legal award.

“Introduction to Forensic Psychology: Research and Application” by Curt R. Bartol, Anne M. Bartol
from Introduction to Forensic Psychology: Research and Application
by Curt R. Bartol, Anne M. Bartol
SAGE Publications, 2014

Any custody arrangement has both benefits and drawbacks, and joint custody is no exception.

“The Marriage and Family Experience: Intimate Relationships in a Changing Society” by Bryan Strong, Theodore F. Cohen
from The Marriage and Family Experience: Intimate Relationships in a Changing Society
by Bryan Strong, Theodore F. Cohen
Cengage Learning, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Just throwing this out there….never move to Arkansas. My husband and our family just moved from that god awful state to Pennsylvania and my son’s bio dad has done parental kidnapping by NOT returning him and illegally holding him in Arkansas. (I have been FULL CUSTODIAL parent for almost 6 years now). His attorney has even gone so far to create fraudulent papers (unsigned by a judge) claiming there is a restraining order. We are going to get it sorted out shortly with a litany of steps and attorneys but my advice is steer clear of Arkansas. The state police, politicians, judges and attorneys there are corrupt beyond measure and if they think you don’t have money, they will bulldoze you. Another fun fact…Arkansas is number 2 in the NATION for p*dophiles per capita. Steer clear of this corrupt backwards state and their ridiculous justice system.

  • It doesn’t work. System is broken. Statistics prove it!

    You want to put children first???? Work on the relationship!!!!!! Put God first!!!!!

  • So my girlfriend pretended like she was going to stay in our apartment with our son after we split up. She then with the help of her brother has run away to Arkansas where her family is. Now she did not tell me this I found out because the property manager of our apartment contacted me to let me know that she had talked to an attorney and decided that because I hadn’t yet filed for a parenting plan she could just take our son down to Arkansas. She has since blocked myself and all of my family on social media, she will not answer texts or phone calls unless she wants something in the moment, and is refuses to tell me where my son is, has told me that she will let him speak to me when he asks. I haven’t seen or heard my son in a week now. Does this count?

  • This is exactly what just happened to my son! Mom moved to New York back in January. (We live in Georgia) May 23rd a police officer knocked on the door and said he would arrest me if I didn’t give her my grandson! The order he had was their separation agreement from years ago! They shared legal custody but my son was the custodial parent. She took his phone from him so he couldn’t call us and turned off the GPS. She took him to New York! The chief of police called and apologized but that was almost two months ago! They haven’t even listed him as a missing child! We’ve paid a attorney thousands of dollars and still nothing. I don’t know what to do at this point.