Sole Physical Child custody Benefits and drawbacks

 

Misconceptions About Sole Custody

Video taken from the channel: Feldstein Family Law Group P.C.


 

What is the difference between Legal Custody & Physical Custody?

Video taken from the channel: LJ Law


 

Sole v. Full Custody

Video taken from the channel: Utah Family Law TV


 

Difference Between Legal & Physical Custody

Video taken from the channel: RIGHT Lawyers


 

How does the court decide whether to award joint or sole legal custody?

Video taken from the channel: Brian T. Mayer, Esq.


 

# 1 ARGUMENT FOR EQUAL 50/50 VISITATION OR SHARED CUSTODY

Video taken from the channel: FathersRights&Resources


 

You Can Lose Joint Custody Because of This One Common Mistake

Video taken from the channel: Command the Courtroom


Like any other custody arrangement, sole physical custody has pros and cons. Some of the key benefits include: The children reside in one primary location, so there is no need to ferry. Some common sole custody visitation schedules include: The every weekend schedule where the child spends every weekend with the noncustodial parent.

The every 3rd week schedule where the child. The Pros and Cons of Getting Sole Legal Custody of a Child Pros and Cons of Sole Legal Custody. It’s important to remember that sole legal custody is different from sole physical Advice for Parents. Sole legal custody.

When parents who have a sole physical custody arrangement, their children live with the custodial parent more than 50% of the time. This parent has the legal authority to make child-related decisions. It helps the children.

The pros and cons of sole custody. Posted on September 18, 2018 July 8, 2019 by hrkadmin. Parents in Illinois and elsewhere may ask for sole physical custody of their children after. The children are no longer living with both parents. Children tend to miss the non-custodial parent.

If not handled correctly, the parent who receives the sole physical custody can appear as the “better”. Sole custody and joint custody are the two overarching forms of custody that parents can receive. Sole and joint custody can apply to legal custody matters as well as physical custody matters. In a sole legal custody arrangement, one parent has exclusive rights to make decisions about a child’s well-being.

In sole physical custody. The Pros and Cons of Various Visitation/Custody Arrangements Joint Legal Custody. If you and your ex are willing to work toward a joint legal custody situation, it can make for a Sole Legal Custody.

Sole legal custody arrangements are becoming less frequent as the family courts. Typically, the sole custodian receives child support, and may receive more child support than parents in joint custody arrangements. Parents with sole legal custody may also be relieved that they don’t have to confer. As well, you avoid living full-time in a low-income sole-parent household.

Children are likely to spend more time with the higher-earning parent. Fathers generally earn more than mothers but often miss out with respect to custody. Cons of Equal Custody.

The main drawback to 50 50, equal custody.

List of related literature:

Researchers have found that mothers, fathers, and children usually prefer joint legal custody to sole custody, and joint legal custody can improve family adjustment and cohesiveness.

“Forensic and Legal Psychology” by Mark Costanzo, Daniel Krauss
from Forensic and Legal Psychology
by Mark Costanzo, Daniel Krauss
Worth Publishers, 2010

The move toward facilitating visitation and joint custody has been based on the premises that continued contact with both parents is desirable and that noncustodial parents with joint custody will be more likely to maintain contact and financial support.

“Developmental Psychopathology: Perspectives on Adjustment, Risk, and Disorder” by Suniya S. Luthar, Luthar et al, Jacob A. Burack, John R. Weisz, Dante Cicchetti, Professor of School/Applied Developmental Psychology and Director of the McGill Youth Study Team Jacob A Burack, Donald J. Cohen, Professor of Child Psychiatry Pediatrics and Psychology and Director Child Study Center Donald J Cohen, M D
from Developmental Psychopathology: Perspectives on Adjustment, Risk, and Disorder
by Suniya S. Luthar, Luthar et al, et. al.
Cambridge University Press, 1997

There arealso disadvantages to shared custody arrangements.

“The Social History of the American Family: An Encyclopedia” by Marilyn J. Coleman, Lawrence H. Ganong
from The Social History of the American Family: An Encyclopedia
by Marilyn J. Coleman, Lawrence H. Ganong
SAGE Publications, 2014

11 What the court fails to recognize is that no parent has sole custody so long as he or she is subject to rules of visitation, and that courts are as powerless to forge affection by a visitation order as they are by decreeing any other form of “joint,” “divided,” or “split” custody.*

“Beyond the Best Interests of the Child” by Joseph Goldstein, Anna Freund, Albert J. Solnit
from Beyond the Best Interests of the Child
by Joseph Goldstein, Anna Freund, Albert J. Solnit
Free Press, 1984

Any custody arrangement has both benefits and drawbacks, and joint custody is no exception.

“The Marriage and Family Experience: Intimate Relationships in a Changing Society” by Bryan Strong, Theodore F. Cohen
from The Marriage and Family Experience: Intimate Relationships in a Changing Society
by Bryan Strong, Theodore F. Cohen
Cengage Learning, 2016

The father in Arnott made two arguments: first, that the move constituted a change in circumstances justifying reconsideration of the original custody order, and second, that the children’s best interest lay with a change in primary custody from the mother to the father.

“Family Law” by Leslie Joan Harris, June R. Carbone, Lee E. Teitelbaum, Rachel Rebouche
from Family Law
by Leslie Joan Harris, June R. Carbone, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer, 2018

After divorce, the types of child custody that may be granted by the courts include joint, split, and sole custody; fathers are increasingly being granted joint or sole custody.

“Behavioral Science” by Barbara Fadem
from Behavioral Science
by Barbara Fadem
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Under such circumstances, the noncustodial parent may very well request that the court reevaluate the original custody determination on the basis that a change in circumstances occurred (or is about to occur), namely the anticipated move.

“California Family Law for Paralegals” by Marshall W. Waller
from California Family Law for Paralegals
by Marshall W. Waller
Wolters Kluwer, 2016

Joint custody offers a solution with some advantages, but it requires substantial maturity on the part of the parents and can present some problems.

“Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry: Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry” by Benjamin J. Sadock, Virginia A. Sadock, Pedro Ruiz
from Kaplan and Sadock’s Synopsis of Psychiatry: Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry
by Benjamin J. Sadock, Virginia A. Sadock, Pedro Ruiz
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2014

This does not include divided or alternating custody, where each parent acts as a sole custodial parent at different times, or split custody, where one parent is awarded sole custody of one or more of the children and the other parent is awarded sole custody of one or more of the children.

“Work of the Family Lawyer” by Robert E. Oliphant, Nancy Ver Steegh
from Work of the Family Lawyer
by Robert E. Oliphant, Nancy Ver Steegh
Wolters Kluwer, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • If there is joint custody does one parent have to tell the other parent where they live my concern is for my safety I don’t know what the other parent is capable of even more now that they have to pay child support I recently found a tracker on my daughter’s phone where they were tracking our every move please someone give me some information and help me

  • Obviously he must’ve been part of the kids life if he fought for their custody.
    A lot of women try to make it impossible for men see the kids after divorce.

  • What about if there’s only visits for the Dad? If Mom has full custody, she can do anything? With or without permissions from me or the court? This is the law in California, if unmarried, Mom has full custody…
    It has no bearing on the Dad or whether or not he and the kids are great together…
    I went from being a full time hands on Dad to getting 12% of their lives… And no decisions ever come my way for consideration/consultation/or just wondering how I feel about this or that… It’s not a good position for any decent parent or any child to be in…
    Three years into it and one more modification hearing to go, and I might get some more time in the summer…
    The worst part is that I can’t really say anything bad about Mom’s skills as a Mom… She’s great. We both are. We’re great with them, just not really all that great with each other…

    Anyway,