Relational Aggression and Why Kids Participate In It

 

What is Relational Aggression?

Video taken from the channel: WMAR-2 News


 

Relational Aggression

Video taken from the channel: AtkinsCounseling


 

Relational Aggression (Short Film)

Video taken from the channel: Help Psych Film Society


 

Relational Aggression Animated

Video taken from the channel: Thewsuplit


 

Beyond Mean Girls: Understanding the Development of Relational Aggression

Video taken from the channel: University of Vermont


 

When kids are mean: relational aggression Maggie Dent

Video taken from the channel: Maggie Dent


 

Bullyology: Relational Aggression

Video taken from the channel: Ben Springer


One of the top reasons girls engage in relational aggression involves establishing and maintaining social status within the school. 3  For instance, girls will use relational aggression to socially isolate someone while increasing their own social status. Any number of factors drive this behavior including everything from envy and a need for attention to a fear of competition. One of the top reasons girls engage in relational aggression involves establishing and maintaining social status within the school. For instance, girls will use relational aggression to socially isolate someone while increasing their own social status.

Family relationships play a role in children’s and teens’ relationally aggressive behaviors. When there’s a lot of conflict between parents, or when parents don’t do a good job of listening to their children, kids are more likely to engage in relational aggression. It was clear that by giving young children an opportunity to justify their negative behaviours and aggressive actions, we as adults (and researchers) can better understand why some children choose to use aggression to achieve social goals whereas others choose more.

Adolescents perceive relational aggression as more acceptable than physical aggression. Media portrayals of adults engaging in relational aggression have reinforced and normalized this behavior for children and adolescents. Relational aggression is a covert form of bullying that includes a pattern of behavior intended to harm someone by damaging her reputation or manipulating her relationships. Relational Aggression Is the Result of Peer Pressure.

Some girls compromise their values or principles just to fit in with a group or to gain acceptance. They might spread rumors or gossip in order to feel like part of the group or become more popular. Relational Aggression and Why Kids Engage In It. www.verywell.com. Relational aggression is an insidious and covert type of bullying that often goes unnoticed by parents and educators.

Relational aggression is the psychologist’s name for what the rest of us call ‘mean girls’ behaviour, or straight-up ‘bitchiness’. It is a pattern of behaviour typically played out by school-age girls, but it is not exclusive to them. In fact, where do they learn it if not from their adult role models?

Relational bullies use social groups to hurt their peers and the peer’s standing within a group. It can be hard to detect social bullying and unfortunately because it isn’t overt, it can go on for a long time unnoticed (think of the movie Mean Girls, a movie about social bullying). Oftentimes people will overlook it as simple teasing.

List of related literature:

Relational aggression emerges quite early and has been documented in children as young as 2½ years of age.

“Encyclopedia of Human Relationships: Vol. 1-” by Harry T. Reis, Susan Sprecher
from Encyclopedia of Human Relationships: Vol. 1-
by Harry T. Reis, Susan Sprecher
SAGE Publications, 2009

When children engage in Relational Aggression, they are modeling a specific type of aggression.

“Encyclopedia of School Psychology” by T. Stuart Watson, Christopher H. Skinner
from Encyclopedia of School Psychology
by T. Stuart Watson, Christopher H. Skinner
Springer US, 2004

Because relational aggression is used to block or damage peer relationships, a child’s development may be adversely affected due to the important, key role these types of relationships play in their lives.

“Handbook of Research on Computer Mediated Communication” by Kelsey, Sigrid, St.Amant, Kirk
from Handbook of Research on Computer Mediated Communication
by Kelsey, Sigrid, St.Amant, Kirk
Information Science Reference, 2008

Relational and overt aggression in middle childhood: Early child and family risk factors.

“Social Development: Relationships in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence” by Marion K. Underwood, Lisa H. Rosen
from Social Development: Relationships in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence
by Marion K. Underwood, Lisa H. Rosen
Guilford Publications, 2011

They proposed an “additive risk” model that separated the risk associated with aggressive behaviors from relational risks with peers, parents, and other adults that typically result from aggression (such as peer rejection and teacher-child conflict).

“Attachment in Middle Childhood” by Kathryn A. Kerns, Rhonda A. Richardson
from Attachment in Middle Childhood
by Kathryn A. Kerns, Rhonda A. Richardson
Guilford Publications, 2005

Mothers’ responses to preschoolers’ relational and physical aggression.

“Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups, Second Edition” by William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen, Kenneth H. Rubin
from Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups, Second Edition
by William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen, Kenneth H. Rubin
Guilford Publications, 2019

Unfortunately, some children in middle childhood have to endure physical aggression from peers or a form of aggression that is often more covert, namely, relational aggression.

“Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology” by Andrew S. Davis, PhD, Rik Carl D'Amato
from Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology
by Andrew S. Davis, PhD, Rik Carl D’Amato
Springer Publishing Company, 2010

Relational aggression in mothers and children: Links with psychological control and child adjustment.

“Handbook of Marriage and the Family” by Gary W. Peterson, Kevin R. Bush
from Handbook of Marriage and the Family
by Gary W. Peterson, Kevin R. Bush
Springer US, 2012

In particular, the rise in acts of covert and relational forms of aggression across development, among both adolescent males and adolescent females, pushes us to consider models of development that move beyond assuming a global decline in aggression as children mature.

“Family Interventions in Domestic Violence: A Handbook of Gender-Inclusive Theory and Treatment” by John Hamel, LCSW, Tonia L. Nicholls, PhD
from Family Interventions in Domestic Violence: A Handbook of Gender-Inclusive Theory and Treatment
by John Hamel, LCSW, Tonia L. Nicholls, PhD
Springer Publishing Company, 2006

When mothers are disagreeable and hostile in their interactions with their children, children are disagreeable and squabble with their mothers, and these children are also both aggressive and likely to receive aggression from their peers (Kochanska, 1992; Hinde, Tamplin, & Barrett, 1993).

“Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups” by Kenneth H. Rubin, William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen
from Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups
by Kenneth H. Rubin, William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen
Guilford Publications, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Another really helpful video Maggie that provided both reminders to consider my own behaviour and ideas and understanding I hadn’t considered. Thank you.