How you can Educate Kids About Expected outcomes within their Lives

 

Cause and Effect Connections

Video taken from the channel: Teaching Independent Learners


 

Cause and Effect for Kids

Video taken from the channel: Mometrix Academy


 

Cause and Effect

Video taken from the channel: KLM Videos for School


 

Cause and Effect for Elementary aged Kids.

Video taken from the channel: Malorie Wright


 

Cause and Effect for Kids | Cause and Effect Video with guided stories, worksheets, and activities

Video taken from the channel: Clarendon Learning


 

Cause and Effect | Reading Strategies | EasyTeaching

Video taken from the channel: EasyTeaching


 

Cause and Effect Lesson

Video taken from the channel: Jennifer Tucker


Activity: Teaching Kids About Cause and Effect Begin by reading a story together or doing a science experiment with a clear cause-effect outcome (like the Dancing Raisin Experiment). Then discuss the concept of cause and effect with your child. Ask them if they have ever heard the phrase before and, if so, see if they can explain what it means. Step 1, Interact with your child.

Even young babies can begin to understand cause and effect: they cry, for example, and someone comes to feed, change, or comfort them. Maximize this natural way of learning by responding to your baby and interacting in various ways. Make faces to get your baby to laugh; pick your baby up if he or she reaches out for you.Step 2, Offer toys.

Babies and. Let’s teach them cause and effect: to know that they are powerful, purposeful agents of their lives who can do anything once they set their mind to it. Assign chores, to yourself, to your children, to your grandchildren, to your employees. Cause and Effect Scenarios. Actions in our everyday lives may effect the outcomes we experience from day to day.

These effects may be positive, negative or in some instance could be neutral. Cause and effect is a repeating theme in learning and life. Use readings and everyday life to help teach your child about cause-effect relationships.

More information. Model a brief cause and effect scenario for your class. Before you begin, ask students to get out a reading log or journal. Encourage students to jot down words, phrases, and observations of your actions.

Guide students by writing the following prompting questions. How to Teach Cause and Effect Using Shared Reading Teaching cause and effect begins with defining both terms clearly for the students. Once that is done, students should then be offered ample opportunity to practice this strategy in discrete lessons. Use the flower example from the anchor chart.

Give each student a flower pattern to cut out. Students then need to write notes on the outside and flip open a pedal to write the signal words. 3. Matching. Make cards with cause on one and effect on the other.

Mix them up. Ripple Effects: Teaching Kids to Understand the Consequences of Their Actions. A first step in teaching our children to understand the consequences of their actions is to provide consequences that suit the action. For example, if your child makes a mess with his toys, the consequence should be to clean them up. We teach cause and effect whenever we help a child recognize a relationship between two things, or when we demonstrate that one event is the result of another.

For your children, I recommend that you seek concrete examples, since they don’t understand complicated things at such an early age.

List of related literature:

Remind the children, for example, how naturally they concentrate on anything, if it really interests them—a good movie, for instance, or an interesting story.

“Education for Life: Preparing Children to Meet the Challenges” by J. Donald Walters
from Education for Life: Preparing Children to Meet the Challenges
by J. Donald Walters
Crystal Clarity Publishers, 1997

Head Start parents’ beliefs about their children’s abilities, task values, and performances on different activities.

“WAIS-IV Clinical Use and Interpretation: Scientist-Practitioner Perspectives” by Lawrence G. Weiss, Donald H. Saklofske, Diane Coalson, Susan Engi Raiford
from WAIS-IV Clinical Use and Interpretation: Scientist-Practitioner Perspectives
by Lawrence G. Weiss, Donald H. Saklofske, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2010

Head start parents’ beliefs about their children’s abilities, task values, and performance on different activities.

“Social Psychology in Sport” by Sophia Jowett, David Lavallee
from Social Psychology in Sport
by Sophia Jowett, David Lavallee
Human Kinetics, 2007

Identify your child’s passions or concerns (polar bears, cleanliness, fossil fuel, graffiti) and then expand her knowledge about that issue.

“The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries” by Michele Borba
from The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries
by Michele Borba
Wiley, 2009

Teach them how to formulate alternative ways of reacting to situations and to weigh the pros and cons of each one.

“Classroom Behavior Management for Diverse and Inclusive Schools” by Herbert Grossman
from Classroom Behavior Management for Diverse and Inclusive Schools
by Herbert Grossman
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2004

Teach them about bike safety and bad guys and traffic signals and how to ask for help and how to handle disappointment and what to do if they get lost and all the things parents have always had to teach their kids.

“Free-Range Kids, How to Raise Safe, Self-Reliant Children (Without Going Nuts with Worry)” by Lenore Skenazy
from Free-Range Kids, How to Raise Safe, Self-Reliant Children (Without Going Nuts with Worry)
by Lenore Skenazy
Wiley, 2010

• Explain to parents that toddlers and preschoolers are concrete and preoperational in their thinking.

“Burns' Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks, Nancy Barber Starr, Margaret A. Brady, Nan M. Gaylord, Martha Driessnack, Karen Duderstadt
from Burns’ Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks, Nancy Barber Starr, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Teach them to see both the positive side of negative events and the potential for growth into stronger persons that those negative events offer.

“Why You Do the Things You Do: The Secret to Healthy Relationships” by Tim Clinton, Gary Sibcy
from Why You Do the Things You Do: The Secret to Healthy Relationships
by Tim Clinton, Gary Sibcy
Thomas Nelson, 2006

If children believe that they are engaging in the activity because they like it or because they chose to be involved, they are more likely to continue to value it.

“Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Search for Optimal Motivation and Performance” by Carol Sansone, Judith M. Harackiewicz
from Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Search for Optimal Motivation and Performance
by Carol Sansone, Judith M. Harackiewicz
Elsevier Science, 2000

For example, preschool children may believe that thinking about something will cause it to happen and so believe that they caused the tornado or the plane crash or the shooting, and the resulting guilt can be overwhelming for them.

“Encyclopedia of Counseling” by Frederick T. Leong
from Encyclopedia of Counseling
by Frederick T. Leong
SAGE Publications, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Let me tell you a cause and effect:

    Cause: Covid-19

    Effect: Online school

    Another one:

    Cause: Covid-19

    Effect: sickness
    Like if relatable like seriously ����