How you can Educate a young child Early Sight Word Abilities at Home

 

Learning Sight Words for Visual Learners: Early Childhood Education

Video taken from the channel: Bette Fetter


 

Creative Ways to Teach Sight Words

Video taken from the channel: TeacherMabid


 

Introducing New Sight Words

Video taken from the channel: Teach for Life


 

Teaching Sight Words: How I make them fun for my kindergarten homeschooler. ��

Video taken from the channel: Jessica Day


 

10 Activities to teach Sight Words to toddlers and preschoolers | Our Journey At Home

Video taken from the channel: Our Journey At Home


 

How to Teach a Child Early Sight Word Skills at Home.Teaching Your Child Early Sight Word Skills

Video taken from the channel: Parenting Education Tips


 

SIGHT WORD ACTIVITIES | How to teach sight words at home for Kindergarten, First and Second Grade

Video taken from the channel: Susan Jones Teaching


These words are very common in early children’s books such as picture books and early illustrated books. There are many ways to teach these words to young children. One of the most frequently used strategies is to simply read to toddlers and touch the words with your finger as they appear in the books. Play Go Fish by turning one card over at a time and trying to match the sight word. Make sure your child reads the word aloud as well as matching them by sight. Make two sets of flashcards for the sight words you want to teach your child, then play games with the cards.

For instance, you can play Go Fish with word cards instead of number cards. You can also play Memory; just shuffle the cards and lay them face down. Your child will pick a card then try to find or remember where they saw the matching card.

But even handier is a portable word wall, in which the child has a small, hand-held version of the sight words he/she uses daily, or should practice daily. The word wall and portable word wall comes in handy throughout the day, giving the child easy and quick access to the correct spelling of frequently used words. Hang them around the classroom. Keep the sight words “in sight.”.

Certain words such as and and the will be hard for children to miss but calling attention to print that contains them is key. You can create big posters of a word, talk about the letters it contains and spend time focusing on its meaning. Here are 10 simple steps to teach your child to read at home: 1. Use songs and nursery rhymes to build phonemic awareness. Children’s songs and nursery rhymes aren’t just a lot of fun—the rhyme and rhythm help kids to hear the sounds and syllables in words, which helps them learn to read.

A good way to build phonemic awareness (one of the most important skills in learning to read) is to clap rhythmically. This will vary for every teacher and the sight words they are required to teach. If you have a lot of freedom here, I would choose words that occur most frequently in their reading. Some people use the Dolch word list to help with this – another good option is to look at the Fry’s word list to see which words appear most in their reading.

Learning how to hold a pencil properly and form letters into a word, even if it doesn’t make sense, sets your child on the right path to literacy. Lightly draw outlines of letters to have your child trace over, or help him to spell his own name. The sight words are a collection of words that a child should learn to recognize without sounding out the letters.

The sight words are both common, frequently used words and foundational words that a child can use to build a vocabulary. Combining sight words with phonics instruction increases a child’s speed and fluency in reading. The Confusion of Word Shapes. The problem of teaching sight words is that there are SO many words with similar shapes, and this is what leads to confusion, frustration, and reading problems!

I do a few different assessments when I get new students, and I have a “special” passage to read for all of my older students, usually the Gr 2 and 3 students.

List of related literature:

Such lessons should start by teaching the building blocks of reading, including sound segmenting, sound blending, basic phonics, and sight words.

“Woodcock-Johnson IV: Reports, Recommendations, and Strategies” by Nancy Mather, Lynne E. Jaffe
from Woodcock-Johnson IV: Reports, Recommendations, and Strategies
by Nancy Mather, Lynne E. Jaffe
Wiley, 2016

For example, Buckley (1999) taught children with Down syndrome how to read by having children visually match printed words with pictures, play word-matching games with flash cards, and manipulate flash cards with words printed on them into sentences.

“Introduction to Abnormal Child and Adolescent Psychology” by Robert Weis
from Introduction to Abnormal Child and Adolescent Psychology
by Robert Weis
SAGE Publications, 2017

Introduce your child to the most common sight words found in books and have her commit them to memory.

“Overcoming Dyslexia (2020 Edition): Second Edition, Completely Revised and Updated” by Sally Shaywitz, M.D., Jonathan Shaywitz MD
from Overcoming Dyslexia (2020 Edition): Second Edition, Completely Revised and Updated
by Sally Shaywitz, M.D., Jonathan Shaywitz MD
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2008

Teaching/flash cards Portable, use few words, and offer visual interpretations.

“Community/Public Health Nursing E-Book: Promoting the Health of Populations” by Mary A. Nies, Melanie McEwen
from Community/Public Health Nursing E-Book: Promoting the Health of Populations
by Mary A. Nies, Melanie McEwen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Supporting head start preschoolers’ language and early reading development: Tutoring as a tier approach.

“International Handbook of Early Childhood Education” by Marilyn Fleer, Bert van Oers
from International Handbook of Early Childhood Education
by Marilyn Fleer, Bert van Oers
Springer Netherlands, 2017

Ask parents to generate a list of words or phrases they would like their child to practice.

“Here's How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Second Edition” by Margaret Fish
from Here’s How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Second Edition
by Margaret Fish
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2015

Traditionally, teachers use flash cards and games to teach sight words found in stories.

“TExES Bilingual Education Supplemental (164) Book + Online” by Luis A. Rosado
from TExES Bilingual Education Supplemental (164) Book + Online
by Luis A. Rosado
Research & Education Association, 2017

Using an iPad® app to improve sight word reading fluency for at-risk first graders.

“The Routledge Handbook of Digital Literacies in Early Childhood” by Ola Erstad, Rosie Flewitt, Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer, Íris Susana Pires Pereira
from The Routledge Handbook of Digital Literacies in Early Childhood
by Ola Erstad, Rosie Flewitt, et. al.
Taylor & Francis, 2019

• Introduce key vocabulary words in the child’s L1, with help from parents or community volunteers.

“Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth Learning English: Promising Futures” by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Board on Science Education, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Committee on Fostering School Success for English Learners: Toward New Directions in Policy, Practice, and Research, Suzanne Le Menestrel, Ruby Takanishi
from Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth Learning English: Promising Futures
by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2017

Each time your child learns a new sight word, write it on an index card and save it in your collection of sight word cards (these sight wordd cards are in the cards available for purchase).

“The Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading” by Jessie Wise, Sara Buffington
from The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading
by Jessie Wise, Sara Buffington
Well-Trained Mind Press, 2004

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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  • Another way to teach sight words using the senses is to use the different flavors of jello powder and have the children glue the letters and then sprinkle the powder on glued areas to create yummy smelling sight words. I do it over a large container and I only use one color at a time so when they shake off the extra ( if they haven’t gobbed the glue too much where it will drip and distort the word) it is able to be reused:)
    I also let them use clay to mold each letter shape until they spell the whole word.

  • Thank you so much for sharing. I’ve learnt so much from your video. I will definitely be watching it again and again. I loved all your practical tips. Jzk khayr sister