How to talk to Your Personal Needs Child About Adolescence

 

AUTISM AND PUBERTY IN BOYS

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What Boys Want to Know About Puberty

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How to talk to your nonverbal special needs teen about her period!! Downs Syndrome

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Talking to Kids About… Puberty

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Parenting A Special Needs Child In Puberty || Meltdown || Aggression

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HOW to Talk to your KIDS about AWKWARD subjects! Talking to your children about SEX

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Helping kids with developmental disabilities handle puberty

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In other words, do not try to tell them everything there is to know about puberty and sexuality all at once. For instance, if your special needs child is a girl, talk to her about menstruation. Begin with explaining what a pad is and what it is used for. Show her how it is used and how it should be disposed of. 2. Ask how much your child already knows.

Doug Goldberg, a blogger at Special Education Advisor, recommends asking what your child already knows as a starting point for discussion. In my son’s case, he still remembers when I was pregnant with his younger brother, so he already knew a little bit about anatomy and reproduction. It’s not easy to talk to any child about how our bodies change during puberty. But how can it be explained to a child with special needs who may or may not understand? This article provides tips and suggestions for parents on how to talk to their child about puberty.

Some teens with special needs may start puberty slightly earlier or later than their peers. First periods typically occur 2-3 years after the start of breast development, while enlargement of scrotum and testes is the first change boys experience. Emphasize to. As you talk about puberty, it is important to do it as calmly and as slowly as possible to give your child every chance to understand what you are discussing.

There is only so much you can discuss at once, so when you get the feeling your child has had enough, give him or her time to digest this information before you can schedule another talk. If your child has a speech disability, or is unable to understand you, you must find another way to communicate what puberty is all about. This can entail a variety of methods. A good book can help, or you may need to find a picture exchange system (PECS) or social story based specifically on puberty. Murphy offers the following tips for parents of special-needs children: Start early.

Don’t wait until your child is 14 and the hormones are already raging. Break it into steps. Say to your menstruating daughter, “This is how you clean yourself.” Find time to sit down and talk with your child. Read a picture book about body changes together. For example; talk with your child about private parts as soon as they are able to understand, and teach your child about puberty changes before they occur.

13. Talk About More Then Just Sex There is much more to healthy sexuality than just sexual intimacy. 6 Keys to Help You Teach Your Special Needs Daughter about Puberty. One of the more challenging aspects of raising a daughter with special needs is teaching her about puberty.

This year my 9 year old, Amelia, started showing the earliest signs of puberty. So with all this in mind, here are some things to consider about puberty, hygiene, and our children with special needs Puberty can begin anywhere between the ages of 10-14 in girls and 12-16 in boys. Puberty is the period of sexual maturation and the achievement of fertility and Hormones are a major player in what goes on in puberty.

List of related literature:

The adults can relay information and tell stories about their own experiences with puberty.

“The New Puberty: How to Navigate Early Development in Today's Girls” by Louise Greenspan, Julianna Deardorff, Ph.D.
from The New Puberty: How to Navigate Early Development in Today’s Girls
by Louise Greenspan, Julianna Deardorff, Ph.D.
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2014

She can discuss the various parts of our bodies involved in speech, obstacles some children encounter, and ways peers can help.

“1001 Great Ideas for Teaching and Raising Children with Autism Or Asperger's” by Ellen Notbohm, Veronica Zysk
from 1001 Great Ideas for Teaching and Raising Children with Autism Or Asperger’s
by Ellen Notbohm, Veronica Zysk
Future Horizons, Incorporated, 2010

Talking to kids about MS is a lot like talking to them about sex — you start with the amount of information they need at the time, and gradually expand on it as they get older and their needs (and your worries) change.

“Multiple Sclerosis For Dummies” by Rosalind Kalb, Nancy Holland, Barbara Giesser, David L. Lander
from Multiple Sclerosis For Dummies
by Rosalind Kalb, Nancy Holland, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

often we just talk to parents direct and then refer to speech therapists which sort of cuts out the nursery.

“Dyslexia, Speech and Language: A Practitioner's Handbook” by Margaret J. Snowling, Joy Stackhouse
from Dyslexia, Speech and Language: A Practitioner’s Handbook
by Margaret J. Snowling, Joy Stackhouse
Wiley, 2013

Make it normal and check in on your child regularly, and don’t worry if topics go off track while talking.

“Nurturing Young Minds: Mental Wellbeing in the Digital Age: Generation Next Book 2” by Ramesh Manocha
from Nurturing Young Minds: Mental Wellbeing in the Digital Age: Generation Next Book 2
by Ramesh Manocha
Hachette Australia, 2017

His/her capability to know new words increases and starts understanding the simple conversation of adults.

“Oswaal CBSE Question Bank Chapterwise & Topicwise Class 11, Physical Education (For 2021 Exam)” by Oswaal Editorial Board
from Oswaal CBSE Question Bank Chapterwise & Topicwise Class 11, Physical Education (For 2021 Exam)
by Oswaal Editorial Board
Oswaal Books, 2020

There are a number of approaches within the speech and language therapy field which involve parents.

“Speech and Language Therapy: The decision-making process when working with children” by Myra Kersner, Jannet A. Wright
from Speech and Language Therapy: The decision-making process when working with children
by Myra Kersner, Jannet A. Wright
Taylor & Francis, 2013

A good way to start communicating is to ask what kind of experiences the child has had with medicines.

“Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmaceutical Care” by Nathaniel M. Rickles, Albert I. Wertheimer, Mickey C. Smith
from Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmaceutical Care
by Nathaniel M. Rickles, Albert I. Wertheimer, Mickey C. Smith
Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2010

A special time set aside to talk with preadolescents about the coming physical, social, and hormonal changes helps prepare them to handle the transitions with greater ease.

“Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, Margaret A. Brady, Nancy Barber Starr, Catherine G. Blosser, Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks
from Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

You can reassure her that puberty is a normal, God­designed process that helps her transition from girl to woman.

“The Ultimate Girls' Body Book: Not-So-Silly Questions About Your Body” by Walt Larimore, MD, Amaryllis Sánchez Wohlever, MD
from The Ultimate Girls’ Body Book: Not-So-Silly Questions About Your Body
by Walt Larimore, MD, Amaryllis Sánchez Wohlever, MD
Zondervan, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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6 comments

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  • I really enjoy you!! You did a great job being respectful to your son and very informational to others!! I love when you talk about autism I relate to you when you do because you explain it in a way where I understand!!!! Also you’re never judgmental you take every question with a grain of salt and answer to the best of your ability and I appreciate you for that!! I still think we would be the best of friends I love you all!! #Noah‘sfanforlife!!!

  • Puberty is a strange thing! Lol I have girls, My oldest is 18 and my youngest is 8.. Everyone told me to expect HELL and craziness. Nope, Its been ok. Lol THANK GOD
    Ok and HOW CUTE and handsome Is Noah!!

  • I wish more parents are like you and don’t avoid discussion. When I was younger I hated my body but my parents never explained anything to me. I learned everything from the internet lol

  • Sorry that you fell hope you heal fast❤ You have so much patience with him and are doing great. Kyle is such a great kid. Hope you all have a great weekend

  • i’ve seen first hand how things an affect an autistic person and how important is for them to understand the birds and the bees and everything past that. I have a friend who is autistic who is in his 30’s now. He was arrested and charged with possession of child pron and honestly didn’t really understand what was wrong with it. His mom had really sheltered him all of his life and he deals with hyper sexual tendencies as an adult. It’s kind of scary how things like that can happen.

  • Is everybody just not gonna talk about when one of the moms said… “are you at the man stage yet?”
    And the teen boy was like “hell yeah!”

    Lmao I’m dead