How to speak to Kids About Race and Cultural Diversity

 

Why we need to Talk to Children about Race & Difference | Biz Lindsay-Ryan | TEDxDePaulUniversity

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


 

How to Talk With Kids About Racism

Video taken from the channel: The Village Church Resources


 

How I Teach Kids About Racism (Kindergarten and 1st Grade)

Video taken from the channel: Naomi O’Brien


 

Talking with Kids about Race and Diversity

Video taken from the channel: Jinnie Cristerna


 

Same Difference (A Children’s Book Story by Calida Rawles) Official Video

Video taken from the channel: Austin Roman


 

Talking to your kids about racial and cultural differences

Video taken from the channel: KING 5


 

How White Parents Can Talk To Kids About Race, Diversity, & Inclusion

Video taken from the channel: Tamron Hall Show


Talking about different cultures and customs and races and answering any questions they have teaches your child that it’s okay to notice differences, and more importantly, it teaches him that it’s good to talk about them. Teach the Value of Racial and Cultural Diversity. I encourage you to take a look at the website for more information and join us for more ways to talk to your kids about race. 2. Take a chill pill. Your attitude can make all the difference to a child learning about race.

Model good behavior. Asking questions and listening closely to the answers will go a long way toward creating an ongoing dialogue with our children about race and justice. Just getting that conversation started is what is important. How to talk about race with your grade-schooler Expose your child to people of all shades.

If you don’t live in a diverse neighborhood and your child doesn’t go to a school with kids of other races, surround her with children’s books and artwork featuring people of different races. Take her to events where you can interact with a range of people. I raised my hand during kindergarten class in 1979 when I was 5-years old and announced that I’m black. I actually got up on my feet to say it.

I am black. And then afterward I sat back down again. I don’t remember what we were supposed to be doing at the time.

In and Continue reading Talking to Children about Race – By Jonathan Miller →. Use these tips to spark your children’s curiosity about who they (and others) are in their world. But the world will teach our kids other lessons about diversity and race when they are out in it, and it likely won’t be the positive, peace-and-love messages we hope they will receive.

That’s why it’s critical to have our own conversations with our kids about our skin color differences and all forms of diversity, including our cultural. Normally we talk about fun kids activities and a variety of parenting tips and hacks on Keep Toddlers Busy, but this is very much the conversation we want to keep having. Racism is a subject that has different meanings to different people, and it can often be difficult to figure out how to effectively communicate with young children. Talking to kids about race.

For instance, if your child notices a commercial that lacks cultural diversity, chat with him about how the ad could be more inclusive. As finance executive Mellody Hobson says, it’s a “conversational third rail.” But, she says, that’s exactly why we need to start talking about it. In this engaging, persuasive talk, Hobson makes the case that speaking openly about race — and particularly about diversity in hiring — makes for better businesses and a better society.

List of related literature:

Take them to school-sponsored events on multiculturalism, don’t discourage them from interacting with children of color, and make topics of inclusion, democracy, and antiracism a part of your everyday vocabulary.

“Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race” by Derald Wing Sue
from Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race
by Derald Wing Sue
Wiley, 2016

In schools with culturally diverse populations, have discussions in small groups led by volunteer parents who understand the language and cultural differences of the new parents.

“The Elementary / Middle School Counselor's Survival Guide” by John J. Schmidt, Ed.D.
from The Elementary / Middle School Counselor’s Survival Guide
by John J. Schmidt, Ed.D.
Wiley, 2010

We need to ask our kids about interracial relationships and racial dynamics at school, make it part of our dialogue with them.

“Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America” by Jennifer Harvey, Tim Wise
from Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America
by Jennifer Harvey, Tim Wise
Abingdon Press, 2018

Teach them that diversity is what makes the world so interesting.

“Handbook of Obesity Treatment” by Thomas A. Wadden, Albert J. Stunkard
from Handbook of Obesity Treatment
by Thomas A. Wadden, Albert J. Stunkard
Guilford Publications, 2004

identify experiences related to race What does the preschooler of color learn from parents and caregivers about the value of her race?

“Inside Transracial Adoption: Strength-based, Culture-sensitizing Parenting Strategies for Inter-country or Domestic Adoptive Families That Don't
from Inside Transracial Adoption: Strength-based, Culture-sensitizing Parenting Strategies for Inter-country or Domestic Adoptive Families That Don’t “Match”, Second Edition
by Gail Steinberg, Beth Hall
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2013

Encourage your child, no matter how young, to have contact with individuals in your community of different races, religions, cultures, genders, abilities, and beliefs.

“The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries” by Michele Borba
from The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries
by Michele Borba
Wiley, 2009

Young children’s curiosity about physical differences associated with race: Shared reading to encourage conversation.

“Handbook of Children and Prejudice: Integrating Research, Practice, and Policy” by Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Deborah J. Johnson, Desiree Baolian Qin, Francisco A. Villarruel, John Norder
from Handbook of Children and Prejudice: Integrating Research, Practice, and Policy
by Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Deborah J. Johnson, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Look for stories that the children can easily identify with and that actively promote gaining a greater understanding of the many kinds of peoples—including recent immigrant groups—that make up this multicultural nation.

“The First R: How Children Learn Race and Racism” by Joe R. Feagin, Debra Van Ausdale
from The First R: How Children Learn Race and Racism
by Joe R. Feagin, Debra Van Ausdale
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2001

Facilitate discussions on what families want to teach their child about their ethnic heritage and cultural and spiritual values and ways to do so.

“What If All the Kids are White?: Anti-bias Multicultural Education with Young Children and Families” by Louise Derman-Sparks, Patricia G. Ramsey, Julie Olsen Edwards
from What If All the Kids are White?: Anti-bias Multicultural Education with Young Children and Families
by Louise Derman-Sparks, Patricia G. Ramsey, Julie Olsen Edwards
Teachers College Press, 2006

Children’s essentialist reasoning about language and race.

“Handbook of Cultural Psychology, Second Edition” by Dov Cohen, Shinobu Kitayama
from Handbook of Cultural Psychology, Second Edition
by Dov Cohen, Shinobu Kitayama
Guilford Publications, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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4 comments

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  • Are you parents??!coz I saw base on my experience parents have good talking about things but their own children can’t race discipline….for me kids how to respect polite obey their parents..not just love but respect… majority in White people the kids never respect about their parents unlike we are asian we respect More about our parents

  • I’m an intern in 2nd grade. When my cohort found out I was teaching my 2nd graders about MLK and how he was assinated (see books and video dont mention the fact that he was shot they breeze over his death), one of my friends asked me about how I could teach that to kids that are so young. 2nd graders get it. They are big kids. We sugarcoat everything and it’s NOT ok! 7 and 8 year olds totally understand what happened and the fact that racism still exists today. So happy and thankful for your resources!

  • What’s the matter don’t like truth. We all already left. #WalkAway.
    Tony Timpa has cops do the same. https://youtu.be/_c-E_i8Q5G0

    https://youtu.be/OVpaYLrNo9o
    Madison Harris 16. When [email protected] by 6. Then kelled.
    Or Sammy Samantha Faris.
    https://youtu.be/DM2NU763dJo
    Or the couple held for days. Raypt. Forced to watch his wife. If he looked away. Cigs on her face. Carved hnkys dy on her chest. Burnt. Hung. Shot. He was raypt with things 2.
    https://youtu.be/5h3zAy_xuIk

  • I am sharing this with my families (along with a bunch of read alouds!!) as we end the school year. It’s been so hard being physically separated from my students during this time….the levels of support are nowhere near what I can normally offer. Thank you so much for the incredible resources you create.:)