How Students May Use a picture Organizer

 

How To Use Graphic Organizers to Demonstrate Understanding

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Graphic Organizers

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Graphic Organizers | Teaching Strategies # 7

Video taken from the channel: Teachings in Education


Graphic organizers also are useful when brainstorming ideas, especially as part of a group project or plan. They can be used for a variety of educational purposes, including sequencing events, analyzing cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, and developing concepts in detail. Graphic organizers are very popular with teachers. Not only do they help students organize their notes and ideas, they enable students with diversified learning styles understand information.

As education strives to reach more students on varying levels, they also provide tools for doing so. Graphic organizers are just what they sound like. Graphic organizer It can allow a third-grade student, for example, to chart out chronologically a summer vacation by writing specific information in each box in a connected series.

Another graphic organizer might have three columns and require a seventh-grade student in a world history class to list the causes of WWII. The researchers concluded that graphic organizers are more effective on posttest, maintenance, and transfer measures. Combining the use of graphic organizers will improve the learning process for upper-elementary, middle and high school students with learning disabilities. Reference: Dexter, D. D., & Hughes, C. A. (2011).

We can use graphic organizers to define, describe, compare, contrast, classify, and sequence, as well as illustrate relationships and show cause and effect to name just a few areas. These. Graphic organizers are defined as a visual display demonstrating the relationship between facts, ideas and concepts. Using visual and spatial modalities, graphic organizers enable students to organize, comprehend and internalize new learning. Here we will be taking a closer look at the benefits of using graphic organizers in the classroom.

Additionally, it stated that graphic organizers are facilitative when students trained to use them were to apply what was learned from explicit instructions. Conclusion Lines, charts, maps, or webs that represent ideas may look elementary at first glance, but graphic organizers provide frameworks for connecting new ideas with schema. Graphic organizers can help to visualize and construct ideas, organize and/or sequence information, plan what to write, increase reading comprehension, brainstorm, organize problems and solutions, compare and contrast ideas, show cause and effect, and more. Special education students often need support in organizing their thoughts and completing multi-stage tasks. Children with sensory processing issues, autism or dyslexia can easily become overwhelmed by the prospect of writing a short essay or even answering questions about material they have read.

Graphic organizers can be effective ways to help typical and atypical learners alike. Graphic organizers benefit students who use them in the following aspects: Help students structure the writing project. Encourage students to judge the pros and cons of making decisions. Generate, classify ideas easily and communicate in a brainstorm.

Examine relationships. Guide students to.

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Once the students are comfortable with using graphic organizers, the teacher can provide the information to the students individually, in pairs, or in small groups, and ask them to choose and complete the appropriate graphic organizer.

“The Classroom of Choice: Giving Students what They Need and Getting what You Want” by Jonathan C. Erwin
from The Classroom of Choice: Giving Students what They Need and Getting what You Want
by Jonathan C. Erwin
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2004

The graphic organizer can take a number of forms, but all forms are designed to help students identify more readily the main and secondary points of the lecture.

“Teaching for Student Learning: Becoming a Master Teacher” by Kevin Ryan, James M. Cooper, Susan Tauer
from Teaching for Student Learning: Becoming a Master Teacher
by Kevin Ryan, James M. Cooper, Susan Tauer
Cengage Learning, 2012

Allow students to complete the graphic organizer on their own or in pairs.

“Teaching Students With High-Incidence Disabilities: Strategies for Diverse Classrooms” by Mary Anne Prater
from Teaching Students With High-Incidence Disabilities: Strategies for Diverse Classrooms
by Mary Anne Prater
SAGE Publications, 2016

Students can use a graphic organizer (such as a KWL chart) to capture new learnings.

“The ELL Teacher's Toolbox: Hundreds of Practical Ideas to Support Your Students” by Larry Ferlazzo, Katie Hull Sypnieski
from The ELL Teacher’s Toolbox: Hundreds of Practical Ideas to Support Your Students
by Larry Ferlazzo, Katie Hull Sypnieski
Wiley, 2018

Have the students create their own graphic organizer, in teams of two or three.

“Teaching Students With Special Needs in Inclusive Classrooms” by Diane P. Bryant, Brian R. Bryant, Deborah D. Smith
from Teaching Students With Special Needs in Inclusive Classrooms
by Diane P. Bryant, Brian R. Bryant, Deborah D. Smith
SAGE Publications, 2019

A graphic organizer may be provided to students.

“The Essentials of Instructional Design: Connecting Fundamental Principles with Process and Practice” by Abbie H. Brown, Timothy D. Green
from The Essentials of Instructional Design: Connecting Fundamental Principles with Process and Practice
by Abbie H. Brown, Timothy D. Green
Taylor & Francis, 2019

This would include fading the graphic organizer, with students creating their own personal graphic organizer they could generate on a separate sheet of paper.

“Handbook of Strategies and Strategic Processing” by Daniel L. Dinsmore, Luke K. Fryer, Meghan M. Parkinson
from Handbook of Strategies and Strategic Processing
by Daniel L. Dinsmore, Luke K. Fryer, Meghan M. Parkinson
Taylor & Francis, 2020

The graphic organizer may be used in a variety of ways.

“Content Area Literacy: An Integrated Approach” by John E. Readence, Thomas W. Bean, R. Scott Baldwin
from Content Area Literacy: An Integrated Approach
by John E. Readence, Thomas W. Bean, R. Scott Baldwin
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• Using the graphic organizer below, have students work in pairs to list important

“Making Connections in Elementary and Middle School Social Studies” by Andrew P. Johnson
from Making Connections in Elementary and Middle School Social Studies
by Andrew P. Johnson
SAGE Publications, 2006

That way, students learn the process of using the organizer and can then use it with any content.

“Differentiated Instructional Strategies: One Size Doesn't Fit All” by Gayle Gregory, Gayle H. Gregory, Carolyn Chapman
from Differentiated Instructional Strategies: One Size Doesn’t Fit All
by Gayle Gregory, Gayle H. Gregory, Carolyn Chapman
SAGE Publications, 2007

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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  • If you would like to make you’re own whiteboard animations. Click the Affiliate Link! http://tidd.ly/5ac1afc7. If you make a purchase, I may receive commission.

  • Love the video! I was somewhat confused on the concept and implementation. I understand better now, and your video gives me some more insight on how to use this concept in the classroom!!