How Augmentative Communication Helps Individuals With Learning Disorders

 

Alternative and Augmentative Communication at Goodwill’s Assistive Technology Exchange Center

Video taken from the channel: OCGoodwill


 

Sensory storytelling helps children with a learning disability to communicate

Video taken from the channel: Mencap


 

Whats New with Augmentative Communication and Assistive Technologies

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


 

Helping give a voice to people with ALS | Boston Children’s Augmentative Communication Program

Video taken from the channel: Boston Children’s Hospital


 

What is Augmentative Communication?

Video taken from the channel: Providence


 

Communicating with people who have a learning disability

Video taken from the channel: Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust


 

Communication: speaking to people with a learning disability

Video taken from the channel: Mencap


Augmentative communication is an alternative way to help students and adults with language disorders use expressive language or receptive language. It is also known as supplemental communication, alternative communication, functional communication, assisted communication or facilitated communication. For people with disabilities that give rise to speech production problems many different methods are used to support and augment their communication.

These can include an individual method of sign and gesture, standardised signing and symbol systems or complex electronic devices. Augmentative and alternative communication is a general term used to refer to approaches, strategies, and tools, that enable children and adults with autism and speech and language disorders to communicate their wants, needs, thoughts, and emotions. Augmentative and alternative communication is not appropriate for everyone with a speech or language disorde. Why use Augmentative and Alternative Communication AAC can be used to help a person understand what is being said to them and/or to help a person express what they want to say. It can be useful for both short and long-term communication needs.

AAC may be suggested for people who have communication difficulties associated with other disabilities, such as. In many cases, students with communication disorders lack the ability to communicate successfully or they are fully nonverbal. This may be due to autism or other speech-inhibiting problems.

Fortunately, assistive technology for communication, also known as Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices or systems, is available to help these students. Using a finger with the help of a keyguard, to isolate the keys; A major advantage of SGDs is that the device allows the individual to say and play with words, which helps the process of acquiring new words and language. In addition, pairing the communicated word with voice output may help the child with the auditory processing of spoken language. Non-verbal individuals can also use visuals as a way to communicate their needs, initiate communication, or respond. Visuals are especially useful with adults who have severe learning difficulties, autism or communication delay.

Visuals are often easier to understand for some adults than spoken words. If a student requires a sign language interpreter or the use of augmentative communication, provide adequate space and time to accommodate these forms of communication. Some students with severe communication disorders will have deficits with the analytical skills required to read and write. Assistive listening devices (ALDs) help amplify the sounds you want to hear, especially where there’s a lot of background noise.

ALDs can be used with a hearing aid or cochlear implant to help a wearer hear certain sounds better. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices help people with communication disorders to express themselves. These devices can range.

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) This section features communication aids, sometimes known as Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and strategies.You may be able to use this equipment to supplement or replace spoken communication if you have difficulty speaking or are unable to speak.

List of related literature:

Language Intervention Strategies in Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders.

“Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation” by Richard L. Harvey, MD, Richard F. Macko, MD, Joel Stein, MD, Carolee J. Winstein, PhD, PT, FAPTA, Richard D. Zorowitz, MD
from Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation
by Richard L. Harvey, MD, Richard F. Macko, MD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

Listed below are websites that provide further information on the topic of augmentative and alternative communication disorders.

“INTRO: A Guide to Communication Sciences and Disorders, Third Edition” by Michael P. Robb
from INTRO: A Guide to Communication Sciences and Disorders, Third Edition
by Michael P. Robb
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2018

Augmentative and alternative communication use and acceptance by adults with traumatic brain injury.

“Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: A Resource Manual, Second Edition” by Jennifer A. Ostergren
from Speech-Language Pathology Assistants: A Resource Manual, Second Edition
by Jennifer A. Ostergren
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2019

Language intervention strategies in aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders (4th ed.).

“Language Disorders in Bilingual Children and Adults” by Kathryn Kohnert
from Language Disorders in Bilingual Children and Adults
by Kathryn Kohnert
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2013

When augmentative communication is incorporated into treatment it should not imply that facilitating verbal output would be overlooked.

“Here's How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Second Edition” by Margaret Fish
from Here’s How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Second Edition
by Margaret Fish
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2015

Language intervention strategies in aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders (5th ed.).

“Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders” by Ilias Papathanasiou, Patrick Coppens, Constantin Potagas
from Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders
by Ilias Papathanasiou, Patrick Coppens, Constantin Potagas
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011

Contrary to learning disorders that are more language/ phonological based, some language functioning in children with NLD (e.g., word recognition and verbal output) is often well developed, whereas other important language functions (e.g., pragmatics and prosody) are often severely impaired.

“The Encyclopedia of Neuropsychological Disorders” by Arthur MacNeill Horton, Jr., EdD, ABPP, ABPN, Chad A. Noggle, PhD, ABN, Raymond S. Dean, PhD, ABPP, ABN, ABPdN
from The Encyclopedia of Neuropsychological Disorders
by Arthur MacNeill Horton, Jr., EdD, ABPP, ABPN, Chad A. Noggle, PhD, ABN, Raymond S. Dean, PhD, ABPP, ABN, ABPdN
Springer Publishing Company, 2011

Augmentative and alternative communication for adults with aphasia.

“Communication Sciences and Disorders: From Science to Clinical Practice” by Ronald B. Gillam, Thomas P. Marquardt
from Communication Sciences and Disorders: From Science to Clinical Practice
by Ronald B. Gillam, Thomas P. Marquardt
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

In: Chapey, R. (Ed.), Language Intervention Strategies in Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders, 4th edn.

“Essential Communication Skills for Nursing and Midwifery E-Book” by Philippa Sully, Joan Dallas
from Essential Communication Skills for Nursing and Midwifery E-Book
by Philippa Sully, Joan Dallas
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Language disorders involve the impaired ability to receive, process, and use auditory, visual, and haptic (touch and movement) symbols in order to negotiate meaning for social interaction and/or academic/professional communication learning.

“Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals, Volume 1” by Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology Cecil R Reynolds, PhD, Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen, Ed.D., NCSP
from Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals, Volume 1
by Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology Cecil R Reynolds, PhD, Cecil R. Reynolds, et. al.
Wiley, 2007

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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