Explanations Why You should Set Limits With Kids

 

Setting Limits on Young Kids Behavior | Keeping Kids Healthy

Video taken from the channel: Montefiore Health System


 

2 Tools to Effectively Set Limits with Children

Video taken from the channel: Hand in Hand Parenting


 

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Video taken from the channel: The Parenting Junkie


 

How To Set Limits Without Damaging My Kids

Video taken from the channel: Live On Purpose TV


 

How Parents Should Set Limits For Kids

Video taken from the channel: The Atlantic


 

Why It Is Important To Set Limits On Media For Kids Jane Healy, PhD

Video taken from the channel: Kids In The House


 

What are parents doing to limit screen time for young kids?

Video taken from the channel: Michigan Medicine


Setting limits with kids means setting a guideline for behavior—even when there’s not an official household rule. Since you can’t set a rule about everything, limits are those spur of the moment guidelines that are situational. You might not have an official rule that says, “No banging spoons on the table,” you might need to say to your child, “Stop banging your spoon.

By setting limits, parents teach kids important skills that will help them succeed in all areas of life. Rules teach children self-discipline. 5 Reasons Why it is Important to Set Limits with Kids.

Setting limits with kids means setting a guideline for behavior, even when there’s not an official household rule. Since you can’t set a rule about everything, limits are those spur of the moment guidelines that are situational. Although you might not have an official rule that says, “No banging spoons on the table,” you might need to. course, partners don’t always agree on what limits to set with kids. But limits are good for kids.

It teaches them appropriate behavior and gives them opportunities to sharpen some of their skills. 1 Limits Teach Kids Self-Discipline Setting limits teaches self-discipline skills. When you say, “It’s time to turn off your video game and do. It’s important to be able to set limits and enforce consequences when limits aren’t followed.

Fortunately, for young children, consequences can be simple. One technique is to give a child a “time-in” where he or she sits quietly in a chair in the same room with you for as many minutes as the child’s age—so, for example, a three-year. Kids want limits because they want someone to be in charge. It’s pretty terrifying to a child to think that no one is in charge, protecting them from what can be a terrifying world. 8. Permissive parents make constant compromises about things that are important to them.

For instance, they may let their child treat them badly. Children who watch a lot of television are more likely to have lower grades and read fewer books. Further, research has shown that cutting down kids’ screen time may improve kids’ health and. Why is this important and how do we set boundaries? How boundaries help.

Here are three key results that kids with boundaries learn: A sense of self. Kids need to know that their thoughts, feelings and choices are theirs, so they can take responsibility for them. They flourish when they can know where they end and others, including parents, begin. The AAP also discusses how we expose our kids to screen time, recommending that caregivers “co-view media” (i.e. watch it with their children) to help children understand what they are seeing.

Looking at how we use screens with our kids is important. Here are four reasons why parents need to be “in charge” of boundary-setting in order to set the tone for a child’s emotional development: 1. Parental boundaries allow kids to feel safe. Secure boundaries set by the parent (not negotiated by the child) reduce anxiety.

List of related literature:

Limits provide structure to the environment and the relationship, so children can feel secure.

“Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship” by Garry L. Landreth
from Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship
by Garry L. Landreth
Brunner-Routledge, 2002

In general, the limit setting in our family was around things that we saw as having a potentially negative impact on our children’s well­being, such as TV, junk food, movies, video games, as well as around behaviors that affected the well­being of others, such as disrespect, hitting, and name­calling.

“Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting” by Myla Kabat-Zinn
from Everyday Blessings: The Inner Work of Mindful Parenting
by Myla Kabat-Zinn
Hachette Books, 2009

Limit Setting and Discipline As infants’ motor skills advance and mobility increases, parents are faced with the need to set safe limits to protect the child and establish a positive and supportive parent–child relationship (see Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention later in this chapter).

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by David Wilson, Cheryl C Rodgers, Marilyn J. Hockenberry
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by David Wilson, Cheryl C Rodgers, Marilyn J. Hockenberry
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Limits are set as needed primarily to provide physical and emotional safety for the child and the therapist, to protect the playroom, and as a tie to reality.

“Encyclopedia of Mental Health” by Howard S. Friedman
from Encyclopedia of Mental Health
by Howard S. Friedman
Elsevier Science, 2015

Limits: Setting limits lets children know what is expected, such as requiring them to always wear

“Pediatric Nursing: A Case-Based Approach” by Gannon Tagher, Lisa Knapp
from Pediatric Nursing: A Case-Based Approach
by Gannon Tagher, Lisa Knapp
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2019

Firm, consistent limits increase children’s sense of security and reinforce the message that an adult cares about them.

“Nursing Care of Children E-Book: Principles and Practice” by Susan R. James, Kristine Nelson, Jean Ashwill
from Nursing Care of Children E-Book: Principles and Practice
by Susan R. James, Kristine Nelson, Jean Ashwill
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Children accept limits better when they help make the rules through a process of discussion that includes a statement containing the reasons for the rules or limits (e.g., safety).

“Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: An Integrative Approach” by Elsie Jones-Smith
from Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: An Integrative Approach
by Elsie Jones-Smith
SAGE Publications, 2014

Limit Setting and Discipline As infants’ motor skills advance and mobility increases, parents are faced with the need to set safe limits to protect the child and establish a positive and supportive parent–child relationship.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Consistent limit-setting provides structure for the child and allows them to experience real-time and realistic consequences for their actions.

“Blending Play Therapy with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Evidence-Based and Other Effective Treatments and Techniques” by Athena A. Drewes
from Blending Play Therapy with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Evidence-Based and Other Effective Treatments and Techniques
by Athena A. Drewes
Wiley, 2009

The number of limits is minimized, but they are important to help children understand their boundaries and how to redirect their energies if their behavior becomes unsafe or destructive.

“Short-Term Play Therapy for Children, Second Edition” by Heidi Gerard Kaduson, Charles E. Schaefer
from Short-Term Play Therapy for Children, Second Edition
by Heidi Gerard Kaduson, Charles E. Schaefer
Guilford Publications, 2006

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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8 comments

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  • What age are we talking about here? It sounds like 5 and under based on the car seat incident the narrator described.

    I don’t think this is a good strategy for kids in this age range. Young children are all about themselves, and really don’t care about what you want… which is why they act in such obscene ways. Things like “seat belt captain” aren’t bad ideas if they work, but it requires you to give the child something they want. This is just a different type of carrot, rather than an alternative to carrot and stick methods.

    The problem with trying to motivate a child this way, IMO, is that most rules that need to be enforced aren’t going to be something a child wants to do. No amount of creativity is going to fix this. Most of the time, the child is going to need to be forced to do something they consider unpleasant… but that is ok IMO. That’s life. They are better off learning to deal with that type of situation when they are young. As the child gets older, they are less likely to accept this harsh reality.

    While I think you should try to explain things ahead of time, be reasonable, be respectful.. younger children probably won’t care. Its good advice, and gives the child a good example on how to deal with conflict… but at some point the hammer inevitably has to come down.

    I try to be emotionally honest with my kid. If I’m angry, I explain it, and I let him know. Same if I’m happy, sad,etc. I would never try to make my kid a seat belt captain if they are actively resisting putting the seat belt on. Instead, they’d see it made me extremely angry. That’s an honest response, and they’ll get to hear all about why I’m mad and what they should do next time to avoid getting yelled at. They’ll learn that if they made my life harder, I make theirs harder. If you always go out of your way to motivate them through pure positivity, I think they’ll be more oblivious of the effects of their actions on others.

  • If you give them the ability to limit there punishment who’s to say they might realize “If I say 2 weeks she will say no just 1 week and soon it comes to if I say 1 week she will say 5 days for the same behavior” do you step in and make it higher? I like your idea and it seems really good

  • Very interesting video.

    The only problem is how at 2:00 they list the 4 rules, and the only visual cues are four sets of abstract shapes. That’s just bad presentation; They should’ve actually shown the rules, or at least used easier to understand representations.

  • I personally go back and forth about this topic within my family and extended family. my children are now 14 & 16 however have been on mobile devices for years. It is a juggling act! I’m glad my children are growing up in healthier ways and involved with Extracurricular activities!

  • Does anyone else find it ironic that a story about limiting screen time includes a nearly 4 minute video about limiting screen time?

  • My teenagers start literally kicking and screaming when you set a limit. Even have thrown a remote or other item at times. My question is what if mom and dad are not on the same page? What if one follows through and is consistent but the other is not? 1how does that or does that affect the child? 2is it important for both parents to follow through with limits if the other parent gave the consequence? One of us does not always follow through nor truly sets limits. Is this a problem? It does often mean the children go to the parent that sets the limits and is consistent and doesn’t take the other parent seriously.

  • Might I suggest a little screen time with the crompet! https://www.audible.com/pd/B083Z9TH3H/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-179384&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_179384_rh_us

  • HI I am form Taiwan
    I have a question to ask
    0:46
    She would buck forward so that we couldn’t physically get her into the seat.
    In this sentence, what the 〝buck〞 meaning?
    I searching the buck mean like dollar, or mean the male of some animals such as deer and rabbits, or (in South Africa) a male or female antelope
    thank you