Do you know the Risks for Being a Bully

 

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03 Bullying as a Risk Factor

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1 Bullying and Social AgressionAn Introduction

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Those who are at risk of being bullied may have one or more risk factors 1,2,3: Are seen as different from their peers (e.g., overweight, underweight, wear their hair differently, wear different clothing or wear glasses, or come from a different race/ethnicity) Are seen as weak or not able to defend themselves. Although bullying can occur among individuals of any weight, overweight and underweight children tend to be at higher risk for bullying. Next to this, Bowes et al showed that early socioenvironmental factors such as domestic violence and problems with neighbors are associated with children’ risk for becoming involved in bullying. Evidence on the association of other early possible risk factors like motor functioning and parental mental health and involvement in bullying later on, is fully lacking.

Believe it or not, there is more than one cause for bullying. In fact, a lot of factors come into play such as the community, peers, the school, the individual and the individual’s family. The major risk factors of bullying are multiple and are associated with the individual, but also linked to the socio-family. environment; parental physical abuse. Generally, children who are bullied have one or more of the following risk factors: Are perceived as different from their peers, such as being overweight or underweight, wearing glasses or different clothing, being new to a school, or being unable to afford what kids consider “cool” Are perceived as weak or unable to defend themselves.

Risk factors for being the victim of bullying include having low understanding of emotional or social interactions, a tendency to become upset easily, or already suffering from anxiety or depression. Actual or perceived obesity of the victim is also a risk factor. Being underweight is slightly associated with being bullied. Generally, children who are bullied have one or more of the following risk factors: Are perceived as different from their peers, such as being overweight or underweight, wearing glasses or different clothing, being new to a school, or being unable to afford what kids consider “cool” Are perceived as weak or unable to defend themselves.

Community Risk Factors Community violence Concentrated neighborhood disadvantage (e.g., high poverty, high unemployment rates, and high density of. Risk clusters for any, moderate, and frequent bullying differ. Children who fight and carry weapons are at highest risk of any bullying.

Weapon-carrying, smoking, and alcohol use are included in the highest risk clusters for moderate and frequent bullying.

List of related literature:

Risk factors for becoming a bully are thus the same as risk factors for conduct disorder in general (Olweus, 1993).

“Rutter's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry” by Sir Michael J. Rutter, Sir Dorothy Bishop, Sir Daniel Pine, Sir Stephen Scott, Sir Jim S. Stevenson, Sir Eric A. Taylor, Sir Anita Thapar
from Rutter’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
by Sir Michael J. Rutter, Sir Dorothy Bishop, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

The risk factors for being bullied include the following:!

“Foundations and Adult Health Nursing E-Book” by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
from Foundations and Adult Health Nursing E-Book
by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Research has attempted to identify characteristics of and risk factors for becoming a bully.

“School Nursing: A Comprehensive Text” by Janice Selekman, Robin Adair Shannon, Catherine F Yonkaitis
from School Nursing: A Comprehensive Text
by Janice Selekman, Robin Adair Shannon, Catherine F Yonkaitis
F. A. Davis Company, 2019

Many of these risk factors can be understood in the light of the bullies’ status

“The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development” by Peter K. Smith, Craig H. Hart
from The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development
by Peter K. Smith, Craig H. Hart
Wiley, 2010

Early studies focused on physical (hitting, pushing, or kicking) and verbal (ridiculing, insulting) bullying.

“Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups, Second Edition” by William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen, Kenneth H. Rubin
from Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups, Second Edition
by William M. Bukowski, Brett Laursen, Kenneth H. Rubin
Guilford Publications, 2019

If there is a marked difference in the balance of power (either financial or status) someone with bullying tendencies will take advantage of it.

“How to be assertive in any situation” by Sue Hadfield, Gill Hasson
from How to be assertive in any situation
by Sue Hadfield, Gill Hasson
Pearson Education Limited, 2012

Although every situation is unique, there are many different risk factors that seem to contribute to bullying behavior.

“Social Work Practice with Children, Fourth Edition” by Nancy Boyd Webb, Luis H. Zayas
from Social Work Practice with Children, Fourth Edition
by Nancy Boyd Webb, Luis H. Zayas
Guilford Publications, 2019

They include getting into physical or verbal fights; having friends who are bullies; being more aggressive than normal; being sent to the principal’s office for being verbally or physically aggressive; having unexplained money or belongings; and blaming others for their actions.

“Health Opportunities Through Physical Education” by Corbin, Charles B, McConnell, Karen, Le Masurier, Guy, Corbin, David, Farrar, Terri
from Health Opportunities Through Physical Education
by Corbin, Charles B, McConnell, Karen, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2014

It is now recognized that bullying can take many forms, including ongoing physical abuse (e.g., hitting and pushing), verbal abuse (e.g., taunting and namecalling), social manipulation (e.g., rumor spreading and purposeful exclusion from activities), and attacks on property (e.g., breaking or stealing belongings).

“Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology” by Charles Spielberger
from Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology
by Charles Spielberger
Elsevier Science, 2004

Being physically hurt and the victim of rumours were the next most frequent forms of bullying in both primary and middle schools.

“The Nature of School Bullying: A Cross-national Perspective” by Peter K. Smith, Richard Catalano, Josine JOSINE JUNGER-TAS, Philip PHILIP SLEE, Yohji MORITA, D. A. N. OLWEUS
from The Nature of School Bullying: A Cross-national Perspective
by Peter K. Smith, Richard Catalano, et. al.
Routledge, 1999

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • The statistics are insane. I can’t imagine 123 people each day. That’s horrible. I know people near and dear to my heart suffering from depression and I strongly believe in keeping an eye on them. I think the sneakiest of all symptoms is the euphoria they show when they’re ready to take their life. It’s so deceiving thinking they’re doing better. So it’s good to be aware of all signs. Anthony Bourdain and Robin Williams were both terrible losses.