Dabrowski’s Intellectual Overexcitability in youngsters

 

Hilary Swank and Emotional Excitability

Video taken from the channel: The Creative Mind


 

Dabrowski’s OEs

Video taken from the channel: butterfly1723


 

Developing Creativity: Excitabilities Our Teeming Brains

Video taken from the channel: The Creative Mind


 

Managing Overexcitabilities

Video taken from the channel: Shannan Belden


 

What is OVEREXCITABILITY? What does OVEREXCITABILITY mean? OVEREXCITABILITY meaning & explanation

Video taken from the channel: The Audiopedia


 

Overexcitabilities

Video taken from the channel: ABDULLAH AZZAM TÜZGEN


 

Dabrowski’s overexcitabilties Training for parents and teachers

Video taken from the channel: Brandi Maynard


Signs of this overexcitability are a high level of curiosity, deep concentration, the capacity for sustained intellectual effort, and a wide variety of interests. Children with this overexcitability tend to be avid readers in their quest for knowledge. They are also excellent problem solvers and love to strategize. Dabrowski’s Overexcitabilities & the Gifted Intelligence/Intellectual. Some might consider this the most traditional marker of gifted children.

Children who are Imagination. This overexcitability cannot be quantified in structured testing or other forms of intelligence measurement. Emotion.

This. Intellectual: These children love to experiment! They seem to have unending curiosity. They seem to have unending curiosity. They often worry about fairness and injustice, and they learn exhaustively about their passions.

Dabrowski’s Intellectual Overexcitability of Children’s Gifted Keupayaan keterlaluan intelektual adalah salah satu daripada kepekaan Super Dabrowski yang biasa di kalangan kanak-kanak berbakat. Ketahui lebih lanjut mengenai jenis kelebihan overexcitability ini. Dabrowski’s Overexcitabilities in Gifted Children On 12 Apr 2016 By Jeffrey Shoemaker, M.Ed² In Education, Gifted This Sunday, April 17th at 9pm ET, #ohiogtchat will be discussing Dabrowski’s Overexcitabilties (OE). Dabrowski identified five areas of intensity-Psychomotor, Sensual, Intellectual, Imaginational, and Emotional.

A person may possess one or more of these. “One who manifests several forms of overexcitability, sees reality in a different, stronger and more multisided manner” (Dabrowski. To the extent that they have intellectual overexcitability, they are more likely to ponder and question. Their emotional overexcitability makes them more sensitive to issues of morality and fairness.

Their imaginational overexcitability prompts them to envision how things might be. Well, yes but the child with this overexcitability takes it to a whole new level. Intellectual overexcitability is the gifted child’s curiosity on steroids.

I had been teaching for almost a year at a very sweet, non-traditional school for the gifted. It was my first year teaching, and I was having a blast!Dabrowski defined overexcitability as a heightened physiological experience of stimuli resulting from increased neuronal sensitivities that cause a person to experience life more intensely and to feel the extremes of joy and sorrow more profoundly.

He called it a “tragic gift.”. Aesthetic and intellectual creativity are often results of imaginational and sensual overexcitabilities. Children who experience the world differently, delight in the beauty of the world, and have active imaginations are often natural creators. Stress relief.

Sensual overexcitability helps us delight in everyday sensual experiences.

List of related literature:

Zenasni, Besançon, and Lubart (2008) found a relationship between creativity and tolerance for ambiguity in adolescents—as well as a relationship between adolescents’ creativity and that of their parents.

“Creativity in the Classroom: Schools of Curious Delight” by Alane Jordan Starko
from Creativity in the Classroom: Schools of Curious Delight
by Alane Jordan Starko
Taylor & Francis, 2017

Rather than assuming that giftedness is transient and that developmental spurters are “possibly the largest single group of gifted children we may identify in the school” (Braggett, 1983, p. 14), we should seek to understand the continuity of giftedness through its

“International Handbook of Giftedness and Talent” by K. A. Heller, F. J. Mönks, R. Subotnik, Robert J. Sternberg
from International Handbook of Giftedness and Talent
by K. A. Heller, F. J. Mönks, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2000

In a related way, studies using the MacArthur CDIs (Fenson et al., 1994) have found that children begin to express GFWs soon after their total vocabulary size reaches 400 words, regardless of how old they are (Caselli, Casadio, & Bates, 1999; Hoff, Quinn, & Giguere, 2018).

“Language and Literacy Development, Second Edition: What Educators Need to Know” by James P. Byrnes, Barbara A. Wasik
from Language and Literacy Development, Second Edition: What Educators Need to Know
by James P. Byrnes, Barbara A. Wasik
Guilford Publications, 2019

While the early conceptions of giftedness said little about creativity, Terman’s longitudinal follow-up of gifted youth, identified in 1920 and 1921 when they were 12 years old, focused on their later creative productivity in adulthood.

“Encyclopedia of Creativity” by Mark A. Runco, Steven R. Pritzker
from Encyclopedia of Creativity
by Mark A. Runco, Steven R. Pritzker
Elsevier Science, 1999

Children who are, as Hiebert (1994) puts it, dependent on schooling for literacy, or who have spent four or more years without rich support for literacy, will tend to show patterns more like younger children.

“Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children” by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences, Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children, Peg Griffin, M. Susan Burns, Catherine E. Snow
from Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children
by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, et. al.
National Academies Press, 1998

Ferreiro and Teberosky’s influential semi-longitudinal study (1982: 263) concluded that by the age of 4, most children understand the main principle that ‘writing is not just lines or marks but a substitute object representing something external to the graphics themselves’.

“Teaching English, Language and Literacy” by Dominic Wyse, Russell Jones, Helen Bradford, Mary Anne Wolpert
from Teaching English, Language and Literacy
by Dominic Wyse, Russell Jones, et. al.
Taylor & Francis, 2018

Morphett and Washburne (1931) developed a theory based on the idea that children should not be exposed to literacy instruction until the age of 6½ years.

“Lenses on Reading, Third Edition: An Introduction to Theories and Models” by Diane H. Tracey, Lesley Mandel Morrow
from Lenses on Reading, Third Edition: An Introduction to Theories and Models
by Diane H. Tracey, Lesley Mandel Morrow
Guilford Publications, 2017

But, constrained as it is, the child’s thinking proceeds along this preordained path in the manner characteristic of the child’s own stage of intellectual development.

“Thought and Language: Мышление И Речь, Психологические Исследования” by Lev Semenovich Vygotskiĭ, Alex Kozulin
from Thought and Language: Мышление И Речь, Психологические Исследования
by Lev Semenovich Vygotskiĭ, Alex Kozulin
MIT Press, 1986

John Protzko, Joshua Aronson, and Clancy Blair (2013) performed a series of metaanalyses on studies that purported to enhance young children’s intellectual functioning and concluded that intelligence can, indeed, be increased.

“Children's Thinking: Cognitive Development and Individual Differences” by David F. Bjorklund, Kayla B. Causey
from Children’s Thinking: Cognitive Development and Individual Differences
by David F. Bjorklund, Kayla B. Causey
SAGE Publications, 2017

Early work with youngsters had convinced him that their thinking was “pre-logical,” but now he described these children as being in the preoperational stage, which is a period in which the reasoning of preschoolers is dominated by magical thinking rather than rational thought.

“A History of Modern Psychology: The Quest for a Science of the Mind” by David C. Ludden, Jr.
from A History of Modern Psychology: The Quest for a Science of the Mind
by David C. Ludden, Jr.
SAGE Publications, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

Add comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *