An introduction to Quality Day Care

 

Quality Child Care: Caring for Infants

Video taken from the channel: First Things First


 

What Does Quality Child Care Look Like? | arbetterbeginnings.com

Video taken from the channel: Better Beginnings


 

Quality Child Care: Classroom Environment

Video taken from the channel: First Things First


 

It’s Time to Put High-Quality Child Care and Pre-K Within Reach

Video taken from the channel: seeprogress


 

Building the Supply of High-Quality Child Care: An Overview

Video taken from the channel: BUILD Initiative


 

Quality Child Care Matters

Video taken from the channel: Childcare Resources


 

The Impact of Quality Child Care on Children’s Development

Video taken from the channel: Steve Adubato


Daycare Centers Several studies found that quality child care programs have certain characteristics in common. Quality indicators measure the conditions that generally foster a safe, nurturing, and stimulating environment for children. Finding quality child care is one of the most important issues parents face.

Deciding who will watch your child while you are at work, at a doctor’s appointment, or simply out for dinner can be a stressful and overwhelming decision. Child care comes in many forms and looks different for. High-Quality Child Care The CCDBG Act and the CCDF final rule establish minimum standards, training, and monitoring requirements to ensure that child care for children receiving CCDF financial assistance protects their health and safety. There are also several provisions to improve child care settings for all children across the country.

High-quality child care creates a stimulating, safe and loving environment for your child. High-quality early learning is critical to a child’s development, but what does high-quality really mean? Experts in the field of early education agree on certain standards they feel child care programs should provide. A Quality Rating and Improvement System, or QRIS, often will use symbols (such as stars) to indicate levels of quality in child care programs. Families can use these QRIS ratings to identify quality child care.

Learn more about QRIS and how to get information on child care quality ratings where you live. Well, quality is defined as a degree of excellence. This means not average, not “it will do” child care, but excellent child care.

Bottom line, you need to feel that the child care provider you select will offer a safe and stimulating, loving environment in which your child will mentally and physically thrive. Child Care Quality. When families need to use child care, it’s important that their children are enrolled in the highest quality care possible.

Research indicates that children who receive a high quality early childhood education have better math, language and social skills as they enter school, and as they grow older require less special education, progress further in school, have fewer interactions with the justice system and have higher earnings. Quality early child care education and preschool can, therefore, be viewed as an investment —one with good returns! Good indicators of high-quality: Small groups of children.

Children receive more individual attention and nurturing when they are in smaller groups and when each caregiver is responsible for fewer children. Many of the indicators have been identified as key surrogates of child care quality that have an impact on young children and as being a reliable tool for identifying high compliant versus low compliant programs. The research literature over the past 20 years has demonstrated that these indicators accomplish two things.

As well, high quality child care is generally understood to have Broad learning and development goals for children, going beyond narrow academic aims like early literacy and numeracy to social, emotional, cultural, artistic and physical goals.

List of related literature:

Although all of the criteria identified by the National Child Care Information Center are important, two are particularly important to consider when looking for high-quality care for infants and young children.

“Child Development” by Laura E. Levine, Joyce Munsch
from Child Development
by Laura E. Levine, Joyce Munsch
SAGE Publications, 2013

Cost, quality, and child outcomes in child care centers: Key findings and recommendations.

“Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood: Paths Toward Excellence and Equity” by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Center for Education, Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics, Heidi Schweingruber, Taniesha A. Woods, Christopher T. Cross
from Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood: Paths Toward Excellence and Equity
by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2009

Resources to familiarize parents with characteristics of quality child care and checklists to systematically evaluate the center and compare it with other facilities can help parents make successful choices.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Theoretically, quality child care should be associated with children who are cognitively, linguistically, and socially prepared for preschool and kindergarten—children who are ready to learn.

“Handbook of Psychology, Developmental Psychology” by Donald K. Freedheim, Irving B. Weiner, Richard M. Lerner, John A. Schinka, M. Ann Easterbrooks, Wayne F. Velicer, Jayanthi Mistry, Alice F. Healy, Robert W. Proctor
from Handbook of Psychology, Developmental Psychology
by Donald K. Freedheim, Irving B. Weiner, et. al.
Wiley, 2003

Quality disparities in child care for at-risk children: comparing Head Start and non-Head Start settings.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

If possible, primary care providers should be available to answer questions and concerns from child-care staff.

“Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book” by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
from Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book
by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

• Possible policies to improve child care include increasing parents’ knowledge about its effects, providing parents with more money to pay for it, supplementing wages of child care workers as a way to reduce turnover, and regulating quality standards.

“Social Development” by Ross D. Parke, Glenn I. Roisman, Amanda J. Rose
from Social Development
by Ross D. Parke, Glenn I. Roisman, Amanda J. Rose
Wiley, 2019

National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement, Office of Child Care, Administration for Children and Families, US Department of Health and Human Services: Child-staff ratios and maximum group size requirements in 2011, https://childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/547_1305 _ratiosgroupsize_2011.pdf.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set” by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, Joseph St. Geme, MD, Nina F Schor, MD, PhD
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set
by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

The final tier of quality consists of the broader community and policy environment in which child care operates.

“From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development” by National Research Council, Institute of Medicine, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development, Deborah A. Phillips, Jack P. Shonkoff
from From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development
by National Research Council, Institute of Medicine, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2000

In addition to providing information about characteristics of quality child care, nurses direct parents to resources and assist them in problem solving as they make their decisions about child care.

“Community Health Nursing: Caring for the Public's Health” by Karen Saucier Lundy, Sharyn Janes
from Community Health Nursing: Caring for the Public’s Health
by Karen Saucier Lundy, Sharyn Janes
Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC, 2005

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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