8 Items to Say When Disciplining Your Kids

 

How to discipline your child effectively Jordan Peterson

Video taken from the channel: Pragmatic Entertainment


 

PARENTING WITHOUT YELLING | HOW TO GET YOUR KIDS TO LISTEN & BEHAVE

Video taken from the channel: Emily Norris


8 Things to Say When Disciplining Your Children “Remember to use your words.”. When it comes to discipline, any parent will tell you that it’s all about consistency. If “No biting.”. When you are disciplining a little one, keep in mind that they don’t necessarily understand everything “Go to. Be respectful of your child.

If you show your child respect even when disciplining your child your child is more likely to respect you, other family members, and. Take a time out: By the time your child is two, time outs can be an effective discipline tool, say the experts at the Canadian Paediatric Society. If your tot angrily whacks his playmate over the head, take him to a designated time-out area where he can calm down and get control of himself.

Allow your child to make choices among acceptable alternatives, redirecting and setting sensible limits. Teach your child to treat others as she wants to be treated. Explain that it’s OK to feel mad sometimes, but not to hurt someone or break things. Teach them how to deal with angry feelings in positive ways, like talking about it. Child discipline is about how to prevent behavioral problems so that punishment for misbehavior is a rare and unnecessary occurrence.

One helpful way to think about child discipline is to see it as another way of teaching your child life lessons rather than as something you do to punish your child for misbehaving. Use discipline strategies that teach your child stealing is wrong and deter them from taking things that don’t belong to them. Why Kids Steal. If your child is stealing, you’ll need to determine the motivation behind the act before making a plan to deal with the behavior. Here are a few common reasons that kids steal.

We love humor. But when disciplining our kiddos humor isn’t funny. When our child smirks and busts a gut during a serious moment, we feel as if those Fourth of July fireworks in our chest are ready to explode.

That grin. That giggle. OH!

It feels like mocking. Let’s consider some things before lighting the fuse. Learn about discipline strategies, temper tantrums, anger management, setting limits, time outs, spanking children, and rewards. Find out everything you need to know about parenting. Parents.com.

The words a teacher uses when disciplining sends a message to children, and not always a good one. If you want to effectively handle classroom discipline, here are ten things not to say when you discipline. “Because I said so.” Problem: God is the ultimate authority, not you. How to Discipline a Child. So you want to know when it is okay to begin disciplining your misbehaving munchkin? Discipline in its simplest forms can start as soon as 8 months of age.

You will know it is time when your once powerless little baby repeatedly slaps your face or pulls off your glasses and laughs hysterically.

List of related literature:

For example, the parents are asked what to do if they want their child to stop screaming, slamming the door, or throwing breakable objects.

“Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents” by Alan E Kazdin
from Parent Management Training: Treatment for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents
by Alan E Kazdin
Oxford University Press, 2005

To inspire (and calm) you right now, Table 15-8 lists bite-sized pieces of good advice to give to your child.

“Teaching Kids to Spell For Dummies” by Tracey Wood
from Teaching Kids to Spell For Dummies
by Tracey Wood
Wiley, 2011

So, although I’ve added a Toddler Toolbox at the end of this chapter, I want to cover what I have discovered to be the most effective tools up front: spankings, routine, choices, redirection, tone of voice, and lots of lovin’.

“Creative Correction” by Lisa Whelchel
from Creative Correction
by Lisa Whelchel
Focus on the Family, 2011

Never nag, threaten, mock, ridicule, or punish your children when they whine.

“Raising Children Who Think for Themselves” by Elisa Medhus M.D.
from Raising Children Who Think for Themselves
by Elisa Medhus M.D.
Atria Books/Beyond Words, 2011

For example, one of our daughters would always ask a specific question after being disciplined: “Daddy [or Mommy], are you happy at me?”

“Jesus Outside the Lines: A Way Forward for Those Who Are Tired of Taking Sides” by Scott Sauls, Gabe Lyons
from Jesus Outside the Lines: A Way Forward for Those Who Are Tired of Taking Sides
by Scott Sauls, Gabe Lyons
Tyndale House Publishers, Incorporated, 2015

These approaches work just fine when your child is in the mood to fling his socks across the room for a slam-dunk into the hamper or when he feels like a big boy if he’s allowed to carry breakable plates from the table to the kitchen, but young children lose interest when the novelty wears off.

“The Blessing Of A Skinned Knee: Using Jewish Teachings to Raise Self-Reliant Children” by Wendy Mogel
from The Blessing Of A Skinned Knee: Using Jewish Teachings to Raise Self-Reliant Children
by Wendy Mogel
Scribner, 2008

7 Do not talk to, look at, argue with, or scold your child while your child is in time-out.

“The Joy of Parenting: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Guide to Effective Parenting in the Early Years” by Lisa W. Coyne, Amy R. Murrell, Kelly G. Wilson
from The Joy of Parenting: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Guide to Effective Parenting in the Early Years
by Lisa W. Coyne, Amy R. Murrell, Kelly G. Wilson
New Harbinger Publications, 2009

In the process of raising our children, I never had a strict list of do’s and don’ts.

“Rachel's Tears: 10th Anniversary Edition: The Spiritual Journey of Columbine Martyr Rachel Scott” by Beth Nimmo, Darrell Scott, Steve Rabey
from Rachel’s Tears: 10th Anniversary Edition: The Spiritual Journey of Columbine Martyr Rachel Scott
by Beth Nimmo, Darrell Scott, Steve Rabey
Thomas Nelson, 2009

Kindness, patience, generosity, praise, courtesy (yes, the parent using “please” and “thank you”), acknowledging error, apologizing when appropriate, listening, accepting responsibility, and deferring gratification—these are some of the most important qualities that go into creating a disciplined personality.

“What Babies Say Before They Can Talk: The Nine Signals Infants Use to Express Their Feelings” by Paul Holinger, Kalia Doner
from What Babies Say Before They Can Talk: The Nine Signals Infants Use to Express Their Feelings
by Paul Holinger, Kalia Doner
Touchstone, 2009

Adding “I love you” will let your toddler know that sometimes we get angry at people we love and that’s okay.

“What to Expect: The Second Year” by Heidi Murkoff
from What to Expect: The Second Year
by Heidi Murkoff
Simon & Schuster UK, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Omg You are amazing, You are totally my mommy idol.I just love how vested you are in giving your kids the best upbringing not materialistically but emotionally and you make alot of great points that im going to put into use.I’m a mum to a 12year old and a 5year old,I work 7 days a week and I’m studying towards a degree.By the end of the day Im usually ready to lose my mind and end up taking it out on my kids or husband but youve really motivated me to be a better mom.Thank you for an amazing channel