Your Possibility of Cardiac Arrest Survival

 

Surviving a Heart Attack CHI Health Clinic

Video taken from the channel: CHI Health


 

Increase your chances of SURVIVAL when experiencing a heart attack Billings Clinic Lunch & Learn

Video taken from the channel: Billings Clinic


 

Dave Cornett: Heart Attack Survivor

Video taken from the channel: Carilion Clinic


 

Surviving a major heart attack Tommy’s Story

Video taken from the channel: HCA West Florida


 

Surviving a Heart Attack

Video taken from the channel: Ascension Michigan


 

Healthy Dose: Study Looks at Why More People Are Surviving Heart Attacks

Video taken from the channel: Cleveland Clinic


 

Teri Arnold’s Heart Attack Survivor Story

Video taken from the channel: American Heart Association


The risk of a heart attack climbs for men after age 45 and for women after age 55. It’s worth noting that survival rates for heart attack patients are better on weekdays compared to weekend. Today, more than 90% of people survive myocardial infarction. That’s the technical term for heart attack; it means an area of damaged and dying heart muscle caused by an interruption in the blood supply.

Some of the decline in deaths is due to doctors’ ability to. There are no guarantees in life. However, if you do suffer a heart attack and are an avid exerciser, you could be increasing your chances of post-heart attack survival by up to 47%!Heart attack is rarely fatal, but SCA is fatal in 95 percent of cases.

SCA can follow a heart attack, and the greatest risk is during the first 30 days after a heart attack. SCA kills about 1,000. The following risk factors can lower a person’s chances of surviving a heart attack: older age smoking diabetes high blood pressure peripheral artery disease chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) chronic liver disease having a history of stroke or cancer.

The odds of dying in the first 30 days after heart attack survivors were admitted to the hospital improved during the study period. For instance, 18.9% of heart attack survivors aged 65 and older. 1 in 4 heart attack and stroke survivors has another. Managing diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol, making healthy lifestyle choices and taking medications like aspirin as recommended by your doctor, may help lower your risk of a second event. The study also found your chances of survival actually went up if you did have a heart attack while you were working out.

That’s because you were more likely to. Research now suggests that if you regularly exercise, you have a better chance of survival if you have a heart attack. The study published in the April 2017 issue of the European Journal of.

The average survival rate for a heart attack is about 50 percent, but only about one in eight of those who have a heart attack during sex go on to recover, The Independent reported.

List of related literature:

Thirty-day survival after cardiac arrest is only 32%, and 1-year survival is 15%.

“Chronic Kidney Disease, Dialysis, and Transplantation E-Book: A Companion to Brenner and Rector’s The Kidney” by Jonathan Himmelfarb, T. Alp Ikizler
from Chronic Kidney Disease, Dialysis, and Transplantation E-Book: A Companion to Brenner and Rector’s The Kidney
by Jonathan Himmelfarb, T. Alp Ikizler
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Nevertheless, survival after a cardiac arrest remains as low as 5%.5-8

“Electrophysiological Disorders of the Heart E-Book” by Sanjeev Saksena, A. John Camm
from Electrophysiological Disorders of the Heart E-Book
by Sanjeev Saksena, A. John Camm
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Thirty­day survival after cardiac arrestis only 32% and 1­year survival 15%.

“Handbook of Dialysis” by John T. Daugirdas, Peter G. Blake, Todd S. Ing
from Handbook of Dialysis
by John T. Daugirdas, Peter G. Blake, Todd S. Ing
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2014

With each 1-MET increase in your exercise capacity, there is a 13 percent improvement in your chances of not dying this year.

“The Life Plan: How Any Man Can Achieve Lasting Health, Great Sex, and a Stronger, Leaner Body” by Jeffry S. Life
from The Life Plan: How Any Man Can Achieve Lasting Health, Great Sex, and a Stronger, Leaner Body
by Jeffry S. Life
Atria Books, 2011

Survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest isn’t much higher, about 25 percent.

“Heart: A History” by Sandeep Jauhar
from Heart: A History
by Sandeep Jauhar
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018

Survival from this is rare unless cardiothoracic back-up is available and cardiac bypass can be quickly established.

“Accident & Emergency: Theory Into Practice” by Brian Dolan, Lynda Holt
from Accident & Emergency: Theory Into Practice
by Brian Dolan, Lynda Holt
Baillière Tindall Elsevier, 2008

So, at very best, these techniques can improve survival after a heart attack by about ten per cent, and we are nowhere near achieving this yet.

“The Great Cholesterol Con: The Truth About What Really Causes Heart Disease and How to Avoid It” by Dr Malcolm Kendrick
from The Great Cholesterol Con: The Truth About What Really Causes Heart Disease and How to Avoid It
by Dr Malcolm Kendrick
John Blake, 2008

Clearly, all of these risk factors are important, but I don’t think that any of them go to the core of why people develop heart disease.

“Dr. Dean Ornish's Program for Reversing Heart Disease: The Only System Scientifically Proven to Reverse Heart Disease Without Drugs or Surgery” by Dean Ornish, M.D.
from Dr. Dean Ornish’s Program for Reversing Heart Disease: The Only System Scientifically Proven to Reverse Heart Disease Without Drugs or Surgery
by Dean Ornish, M.D.
Random House Publishing Group, 2010

According to research, 80–90 percent of those who develop heart disease and 95 percent of those who suffer a fatal heart attack have at least one major risk factor.

“An Invitation to Health, Brief Edition” by Dianne Hales
from An Invitation to Health, Brief Edition
by Dianne Hales
Cengage Learning, 2016

Probably no one thing causes a heart attack; rather, a combination of many of the foregoing elements can increase your chances significantly.

“The People's Pharmacy, Completely New and Revised” by Joe Graedon, MS, Teresa Graedon
from The People’s Pharmacy, Completely New and Revised
by Joe Graedon, MS, Teresa Graedon
St. Martin’s Press, 1998

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • Teri,

    Your speech is an amazing testament. I too struggle with heart disease and it scares me every night I go to bed and I’m unsure what might happen tomorrow. I used to mountain bike, play tennis, and a slew of other physical activities that would surprise people. I had a heart attack and since then, the only thing I worry about is who will care for my family…

    when the next heart attacks claims me. Be strong.

  • Your story brought tears to my eyes! That intense desire to be back to normal, to have your life back ( pre heart disease) is something so palpable. I could feel it through the video. And your relationship with your wife is so wonderful! True love right here! Thank for advocating for research for this disease ( which I battle daily as well). The comment about going to the grocery storeI could feel your pain ( the literal and figurative one).

  • You know I had my heart attack 15 years ago my son who was 7 at the time called 911 on his own accord which saved my life because I thought it was indigestion. When the ambulance arrived at the ER a team was waiting on me. Forever grateful