Yes, You Are Able To Prevent Cervical Cancer

 

Speaking out to stop HPV and cervical cancer

Video taken from the channel: WHO Regional Office for Europe


 

Your Guide to Cervical Screening (smear test)

Video taken from the channel: Jos Trust


 

Preventing Cervical Cancer in the 21st Century

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


 

“So, how is your cervix doing?” Cervical cancer screening

Video taken from the channel: South West Regional Cancer Program


 

Your Guide to Cervical Screening (smear test) Bengali Sylheti

Video taken from the channel: Jos Trust


 

Preventing Cervical Cancer

Video taken from the channel: Lee Health


 

You Can Prevent Cervical Cancer

Video taken from the channel: American Sexual Health Association


The two most important things you can do to prevent cervical cancer are to get the HPV vaccine if you are eligible, and to be tested regularly according to American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines. These can be found in The American Cancer Society Guidelines for. FRIDAY, Feb.

19, 2016 (HealthDay News) Although cervical cancer claims the lives of an estimated 4,000 American women every year, the disease is largely preventable, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. What’s more, if the disease is diagnosed early, cervical cancer is often curable, the agency said. Yes, you CAN prevent cervical cancer!

Janice Hammond More than 1 million people in the United States get cancer each year. But did you know certain types of cancer can be prevented? Cervical cancer is almost completely preventable, and in this article we’ll review some strategies. How Can You Prevent Cervical Cancer? Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer deaths in women.

But thanks to screenings such as the pap and HPV tests, cervical cancer rates are declining. FRIDAY, Feb. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) Although cervical cancer claims the lives of an estimated 4,000 American women every year, the disease is largely preventable, according to the U.S.

Food and Drug Administration. One of the most important things you can do to prevent cervical cancer is to get regular checkups and Pap tests as recommended by your doctor. Reducing Your Risk Factors 1. Understanding what increases your chances of developing cervical cancer can help you to cut back and to adopt safer 2. There are two HPV vaccines available, Gardasil and Cervarix, that are recommended for girls around. One of the easiest ways to prevent cervical cancer is by getting screened regularly with a Pap smear and/or hrHPV test. Screening picks up precancerous cell.

Cervical cancer can often be prevented by having regular screenings to find any precancers and treat them, as well as receiving the HPV vaccine. The HPV vaccine Gardasil is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for prevention of cervical cancer caused by HPV (see Risk Factors) for people between 9 and 45 years old. Screening tests and the HPV vaccine can help prevent cervical cancer. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.

Are you worried about the cost? CDC offers free or low-cost cervical cancer screening tests.

List of related literature:

To further reduce the risk of cervical cancer, it is recommended that women practice safe sex (using condoms) and limit their number of sexual partners, avoiding partners who participate in high-risk sexual activities.

“Building a Medical Vocabulary E-Book: with Spanish Translations” by Peggy C. Leonard
from Building a Medical Vocabulary E-Book: with Spanish Translations
by Peggy C. Leonard
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Therefore, preventing HPV infection can prevent cervical cancer.

“IAPSM's Textbook of Community Medicine” by AM Kadri
from IAPSM’s Textbook of Community Medicine
by AM Kadri
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2019

Together, these four strains are responsible for 70% of cases of cervical cancer and 90% of cases of genital warts.2 Used together, vaccination and screening to find and prevent the remaining 30% of cervical cancer cases could virtually eliminate cervical cancer.

“New Dimensions in Women's Health” by Linda Lewis Alexander, Judith H. LaRosa, Helaine Bader, Susan Garfield
from New Dimensions in Women’s Health
by Linda Lewis Alexander, Judith H. LaRosa, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC, 2009

Sexually active women with multiple partners or with nonmonogamous partners can lower their risk of cervical cancer by using male or female condoms to protect themselves against HPV.

“Essential Concepts for Healthy Living” by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
from Essential Concepts for Healthy Living
by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2005

Cervical cancer is a preventable disease when primary and secondary prevention are used.

“Textbook of Family Medicine E-Book” by Robert E. Rakel
from Textbook of Family Medicine E-Book
by Robert E. Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

However, women can be advised that the risk of cervical cancer can be reduced through condom use, HPV vaccination (young people) and regular cervical screening.

“Dewhurst's Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
from Dewhurst’s Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
Wiley, 2012

May increase risk of cervical carcinoma in women infected with HPV virus (increased risk may be due to increased sexual activity).

“Concise Pathology for Exam Preparation” by Khanna
from Concise Pathology for Exam Preparation
by Khanna
Elsevier (A Divisionof Reed Elsevier India Pvt. Limited), 2009

How can cervical cancer be prevented?

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

Primary prevention of cervical cancer can be achieved through vaccination with one of the two U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccinations against HPV (see the Enrichment box about Human Papillomavirus Vaccine and Cervical Cancer).

“Essentials of Human Diseases and Conditions” by Margaret Schell Frazier, RN, CMA, BS, Jeanette Drzymkowski, RN, BS
from Essentials of Human Diseases and Conditions
by Margaret Schell Frazier, RN, CMA, BS, Jeanette Drzymkowski, RN, BS
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

• If you are a sexually active woman with multiple partners or with nonmonogamous partners, you can lower your risk of cervical cancer by using male or female condoms to protect yourself against HPV.

“Essential Concepts for Healthy Living” by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
from Essential Concepts for Healthy Living
by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

1 comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Great work, Jos trust! Very pleased to be a part of it!
    I will definitely share it to my social media for everybody. I will include links for different languages as well.