Working Overtime Could Raise Women’s Diabetes Risk

 

Women Sleep Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: CBS New York


 

Can Working Overtime Lead To Diabetes?

Video taken from the channel: dailyRx


 

WOMEN WHO WORK OVERTIME AT RISK FOR DIABETES

Video taken from the channel: NWAhomepage com


 

Study: Women who work 45+ hours a week have higher risk of Type 2 diabetes

Video taken from the channel: LOCAL 12


 

WOMEN WHO WORK OVERTIME AT RISK FOR DIABETES

Video taken from the channel: NWAhomepage com


 

Work Hours Could Up Diabetes Risk

Video taken from the channel: WTAE-TV Pittsburgh


 

Ask the Doctor Women and Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: Lifescript TV


MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) Working lots of overtime may get you appreciation from the boss, but it might be bad for your health. New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more. Working Overtime Could Raise Women’s Diabetes Risk MONDAY, July 2, 2018 Working lots of overtime may get you appreciation from the boss, but it might be bad for your health.

New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more hours a week have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who log 35 to 40 hours weekly. Working lots of overtime may get you appreciation from the boss, but it might be bad for your health. New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more hours a week have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who log 35 to 40 hours weekly. MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) Working lots of overtime may get you appreciation from the boss, but it might be bad for your health. READ: 3 Types of Diabetes.

New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more hours a week have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who log 35 to 40 hours weekly. Working Overtime Could Raise Women’s Diabetes Risk MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Working lots of overtime may get you appreciation from the boss, but it might be bad for your health. New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more hours a week have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who log 35 to 40 hours weekly. Working overtime at work and at home can be hazardous to women’s health.

0 Working 45 or more hours a week increases your risk of type 2 diabetes. Working lots of overtime may get you. Working Overtime Could Raise Womens Diabetes Risk MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) Working lots of overtime may get you appreciation from the boss, but it might be bad for your health. New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more hours a week have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who log 35 to 40 hours weekly.

MONDAY, July 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) Working lots of overtime may get you appreciation from the boss, but it might be bad for your health. New research suggests that women who clock 45 or more hours a week have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than women who log 35 to 40 hours weekly. Working overtime may increase the risk of diabetes for women but not for men, a new medical research study has found.

In fact, men who spend more hours on the job appear to have a diminished risk, the researchers reported. Working Overtime Could Increase Risk of Diabetes in Women July 4, 2018 by Janey Danes Leave a Comment [dropcap]I[/dropcap] f you’re a woman and you’re working long hours, then you’re at high risk of developing diabetes, according to a study.

List of related literature:

Diabetes can also affect employment through increased sick leave and absenteeism and by adversely influencing productivity.

“Textbook of Diabetes” by Richard I. G. Holt, Clive Cockram, Allan Flyvbjerg, Barry J. Goldstein
from Textbook of Diabetes
by Richard I. G. Holt, Clive Cockram, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

For some time now, there has been concern among employers that diabetic employees may have high rates of absenteeism.

“Diabetes in America” by National Diabetes Data Group (U.S.), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Diabetes in America
by National Diabetes Data Group (U.S.), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 1995

And Table VII will show that this is no uncommon fact but that several of those reporting illness lose no time from work.

“The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study” by W. E. B. Du Bois, Elijah Anderson
from The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study
by W. E. B. Du Bois, Elijah Anderson
University of Pennsylvania Press, Incorporated, 2010

Men’s overtime was even associated with a significantly reduced risk of infarction.

“Stress Consequences: Mental, Neuropsychological and Socioeconomic” by George Fink
from Stress Consequences: Mental, Neuropsychological and Socioeconomic
by George Fink
Elsevier Science, 2010

Those with diabetes may require adjustments at work to facilitate their employment and help them control their diabetes better.

“Fitness for Work: The Medical Aspects” by John Hobson, Julia Smedley
from Fitness for Work: The Medical Aspects
by John Hobson, Julia Smedley
Oxford University Press, 2019

This risk was particularly pronounced for men who reported working more than 40 h/week.

“Handbook of Obesity Volume 1: Epidemiology, Etiology, and Physiopathology, Third Edition” by George A. Bray
from Handbook of Obesity Volume 1: Epidemiology, Etiology, and Physiopathology, Third Edition
by George A. Bray
CRC Press, 2014

It may also improve the long-term health of the woman potentially by reducing her risk of developing chronic type 2 diabetes.

“High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult” by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, Carl P. Weiner, Bernard Gonik
from High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult
by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

New overtime legislation may exempt some nurses.

“Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application” by Bessie L. Marquis, Carol Jorgensen Huston
from Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application
by Bessie L. Marquis, Carol Jorgensen Huston
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Since this study was inconclusive, nurses can continue to counsel women to improve their lifestyle (e.g., diet, exercise, weight management) to avoid health problems later in life related to diabetes and heart disease.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Women with diabetes who exercise moderately or vigorously for at least 4 hours per week have a 40% lower risk of developing coronary disease than those with lower exercise levels.

“Netter's Cardiology E-Book” by George Stouffer, Marschall S. Runge, Cam Patterson
from Netter’s Cardiology E-Book
by George Stouffer, Marschall S. Runge, Cam Patterson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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