Workaholics May Face Greater Stroke Risk

 

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Compared to those who worked a standard number of hours per week, the risk of stroke was 10 percent higher among those who worked 41 to 48 hours and 27 percent higher among those who worked 49 to. Workaholics May Face Higher Stroke Risk: Study. Lack of exercise, stress and higher drinking rates could be to blame, researchers say.

Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And “More information” links may no longer work. WEDNESDAY, Aug.

19, 2015 (HealthDay News) Millions of workers who put in lots of overtime may be upping their odds for a stroke, a new study contends. “Working long hours is associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke, and perhaps also coronary heart disease,” study author Mika Kivimaki, a professor of epidemiology at University College London, said in a news release from The. While researchers couldn’t prove an exact cause for the increased stroke risk, they suggest physical inactivity, higher drinking rates and higher stress levels associated with workaholics may be to blame. One physician said he was “surprised” by the study’s results. Millions of workers who put in lots of overtime may be upping their odds for a stroke, a new study contends. The study couldn’t prove cause and effect, but experts said today’s harried workers should seek ways to curb the risk.

People who worked an average of 41–48 hours a week had a 10% higher risk of stroke, while those who worked between 49 and 54 hours a week had a 27% higher risk of having a stroke. The increased risk remained the same even after accounting for other factors, such as alcohol consumption, smoking, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. WEDNESDAY, Aug.

19, 2015 (HealthDay News) Millions of workers who put in lots of overtime may be upping their odds for a stroke, a new study contends. “Working long hours is associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke, and perhaps also coronary heart disease,” study author Mika Kivimaki, a professor of epidemiology at University College London, said in a news release from The. Millions of workers who put in lots of overtime may be upping their odds for a stroke, a new study contends. “Working long hours is associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke, and perhaps also coronary heart disease,” study author Mika. workaholics may have a higher risk of stroke September 2, 2015 by admin A recent study suggested that employees who work longer hours so called “workaholics” may have an increased incidence of stroke compared to those working “standard hours” according to Dr.

Steven Reisman a cardiologist in New York City. Lack of exercise, stress and higher drinking rates could be to blame, researchers say Millions of workers who put in lots of overtime may be upping their odds for a stroke, a new study contends. “Working long hours is associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke, and perhaps also coronary heart disease,” study author.

List of related literature:

Workaholics probably produce the same effect, since psychological stress seems to be just as effective as physical stress.

“Grooming, Gossip, and the Evolution of Language” by Robin Dunbar, Robin Ian MacDonald Dunbar
from Grooming, Gossip, and the Evolution of Language
by Robin Dunbar, Robin Ian MacDonald Dunbar
Harvard University Press, 1998

In addition, workaholics are at higher risk for burnout.¹

“Chained to the Desk (Third Edition): A Guidebook for Workaholics, Their Partners and Children, and the Clinicians Who Treat Them” by Bryan E. Robinson
from Chained to the Desk (Third Edition): A Guidebook for Workaholics, Their Partners and Children, and the Clinicians Who Treat Them
by Bryan E. Robinson
NYU Press, 2014

Previous stroke significantly increases risk of further episodes.

“The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke” by Judith Mackay, George A. Mensah, World Health Organization
from The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke
by Judith Mackay, George A. Mensah, World Health Organization
World Health Organization, 2004

Additionally, workaholics are more prone to such secondary addictions as alcoholism and overeating.

“Encyclopedia of Industrial and Organizational Psychology” by Steven G. Rogelberg
from Encyclopedia of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
by Steven G. Rogelberg
SAGE Publications, 2007

Indeed, workaholics may actually create more work for themselves, although their motivation for this may be very different.

“Employee Engagement: Tools for Analysis, Practice, and Competitive Advantage” by William H. Macey, Benjamin Schneider, Karen M. Barbera, Scott A. Young
from Employee Engagement: Tools for Analysis, Practice, and Competitive Advantage
by William H. Macey, Benjamin Schneider, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Here’s the potential good news: Working for highly motivated, task-oriented, always “on” Workaholics can be a career booster.

“Managing Up: How to Move up, Win at Work, and Succeed with Any Type of Boss” by Mary Abbajay
from Managing Up: How to Move up, Win at Work, and Succeed with Any Type of Boss
by Mary Abbajay
Wiley, 2018

While there continues to be debate on the role that chronic stress (and especially depression) might play as a chronic risk factor for stroke (11), there is no evidence that the usual stresses of the workplace represent a specific risk for stroke survivors.

“Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation” by Richard L. Harvey, MD, Richard F. Macko, MD, Joel Stein, MD, Carolee J. Winstein, PhD, PT, FAPTA, Richard D. Zorowitz, MD
from Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation
by Richard L. Harvey, MD, Richard F. Macko, MD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

Workaholics can kill themselves via stomach ailments, alcoholism, accidents brought on by physical fatigue, excessive smoking and eating, insomnia, and even suicide.

“Work Motivation in Organizational Behavior” by Craig C. Pinder
from Work Motivation in Organizational Behavior
by Craig C. Pinder
Taylor & Francis, 2014

Strokes, as would be expected, increase the subsequent fall risk at least twofold.

“Neurology in Clinical Practice: Principles of diagnosis and management” by Walter George Bradley
from Neurology in Clinical Practice: Principles of diagnosis and management
by Walter George Bradley
Butterworth-Heinemann, 2004

Which of these is not a risk factor for stroke?

“Workbook and Competency Evaluation Review for Mosby's Textbook for Nursing Assistants E-Book” by Sheila A. Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert, Relda T. Kelly
from Workbook and Competency Evaluation Review for Mosby’s Textbook for Nursing Assistants E-Book
by Sheila A. Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert, Relda T. Kelly
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I think it becomes a problem at 8 hours a day.. Because if you think about it.. most people have more to do after work.. A regular day should be 4 hours of work not 8. If you are really tired after 8 hours of work, that means you should work less. If you’re okay after 8 hours of work and can do other chores with no issues, then maybe you’re superman or superwomen.. so good for you.