Without Day Care, Work and Family Are Impossible

 

5 Childcare Benefits for Working Parents

Video taken from the channel: HR360Inc


 

Hefty child care costs present catch-22 for working parents

Video taken from the channel: PBS NewsHour


 

The True Costs of Childcare that No One Tells You | The Cost of Being a Woman | ELLE

Video taken from the channel: ELLE


 

The Importance of Continuity of Child Care

Video taken from the channel: usgovACF


 

Family Child Care: Supporting Quality

Video taken from the channel: usgovACF


 

Child Care Is Hard but It Doesn’t Have to Be

Video taken from the channel: National Women’s Law Center


 

Some parents may be pushed out of the workforce due to lack of child care

Video taken from the channel: PBS NewsHour


Without child care, work and family are impossible May 19, 2020 8.16am EDT. Shauna Shames, Rutgers I have a Ph.D. from Harvard and a 20-month-old child. Without child car.

It’s not a work-family conflict; it is a lack of high-quality, low-cost child care. Framing the problem otherwise damages the ability to enact good solutions. It also makes a lot of goo. It’s not a work-family conflict; it is a lack of high-quality, low-cost child care. Framing the problem otherwise damages the ability to enact good solutions.

It also makes a lot of good, hardworking parents feel enduring guilt over a problem that isn’t theirs alone to solve. It’s not a work-family conflict; it is a lack of high-quality, low-cost child care. Framing the problem otherwise damages the ability to enact good solutions.

It also makes a lot of goo. The Oasis Reporters May 19, 2020 Work and family, without good childcare, are mutually exclusive.Getty/Malte Mueller Shauna Shames, Rutgers University I have a Ph.D. from Harvard and a 20-month-old child. Without child care, life revolves around the toddler. I am a political science professor and researcher, but lacking child care, I count myself lucky to work a few hours each day. I am increasingly.

It’s not a work-family conflict; it is a lack of high-quality, low-cost child care. Framing the problem otherwise damages the ability to enact good solutions. It also makes a lot of good, hardworking parents feel enduring guilt over a problem that isn’t theirs alone to solve. It’s not a work-family conflict; it is a lack of high-quality, low-cost child care. Framing the problem otherwise damages the ability to enact good solutions.

It also makes a lot of good, hardworking parents feel enduring guilt over a problem that isn’t theirs alone to solve. It’s not a work-family conflict; it is a lack of high-quality, low-cost child care. Framing the problem otherwise damages the ability to enact good solutions. It also makes a lot of goo. Excerpted from the article I have a Ph.D. from Harvard and a 20-month-old child.

Without child care, life revolves around the toddler. I am a political science professor and researcher, but lacking child care, I count myself lucky to work a few hours each day. I am increasingly aware there is no such thing as the so-called work/family conflict.

You can’t afford spiraling child-care costs, but you can’t afford not to work. Either way, you have no financial safety net. You’re scared, mad, and second-guessing your choices.

We hear you.

List of related literature:

Working couples sometimes find they can reshape their work hours (at least temporarily) and cover a bigger portion of child care themselves.

“Getting to 50/50: How Working Parents Can Have It All” by Sharon Meers, Joanna Strober
from Getting to 50/50: How Working Parents Can Have It All
by Sharon Meers, Joanna Strober
Viva Editions, 2013

It is true (by definition) that sufficiently well staffed and loving day care is as good as maternal care, but the very question at issue is whether children can get sufficient attention anywhere but home.

“Feminism and Freedom” by Michael E. Levin
from Feminism and Freedom
by Michael E. Levin
Transaction Books, 1987

A good place to start is with the consensus that children are not best served if both parents are away from home eleven hours a day.

“Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What To Do About It” by Joan Williams
from Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What To Do About It
by Joan Williams
Oxford University Press, 2001

Some families can explore the option of having only one parent return to work, letting the other parent stay at home full-time to care for the baby.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Not many fathers have working conditions flexible enough to fill these gaps, and good day care is expensive and hard to come by.

“Endangered Minds: Why Children Dont Think And What We Can Do About I” by Jane M. Healy
from Endangered Minds: Why Children Dont Think And What We Can Do About I
by Jane M. Healy
Simon & Schuster, 2011

But millions of children are left to take care of themselves at home alone while parents work.

“Encyclopedia of Business Ethics and Society” by Robert W. Kolb
from Encyclopedia of Business Ethics and Society
by Robert W. Kolb
SAGE Publications, 2008

And it’s impossible to schedule child care when your work hours are constantly changing.”

“Kiss the Girls and Make Them Cry: A Novel” by Mary Higgins Clark
from Kiss the Girls and Make Them Cry: A Novel
by Mary Higgins Clark
Simon & Schuster, 2019

Even so, the children will generally not be at home without their mother for more than two or three hours.

“The Natural Superiority of Women” by Ashley Montagu
from The Natural Superiority of Women
by Ashley Montagu
AltaMira Press, 1999

This is not to suggest that mothers should not work full time, but rather to point out the unrealistic expectations and unbalanced workloads our culture places on this one family role.

“Experience Sampling Method: Measuring the Quality of Everyday Life” by Joel M. Hektner, Jennifer A. Schmidt, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
from Experience Sampling Method: Measuring the Quality of Everyday Life
by Joel M. Hektner, Jennifer A. Schmidt, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
SAGE Publications, 2007

It is possible for parents to both work and care!

“Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
from Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession
by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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12 comments

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  • Parents pay to much for daycare workers just go get pay a little over min wage even with a degree you still ain’t making a lot of money I work at daycare and low income one where they would charge $150-180 per week per child.

  • We pay almost 2,000/ mo in the SF Bay Area. We can just manage it, but there’s no way if we have 2! I was considering taking more time off next time but this gives me pause. My work and career are important to me and I shouldn’t take this hit. It’s so unfair for women to have to make these choices that’s why the systemic changes you talk about are so important!! Thanks for this video.

  • I was lucky to had been a stay-at-home-mom for 8 years, however it REALLY HURT my resume. However, once each of my kids went to school, I was able to do in-home daycare. It is easy to get certified, depending on your location. I also was a certified personal trainer, which was two hours a day at night during my gym-time, and was able to work-out at the same time getting paid. I also made my own schedule, so it worked out. However, with that I was able to bring in some income to keep me sane. I got lucky when another working mother took a chance with me based off of my determination to work and hired me. Then two years later I became a supervisor. So I never had to pay for childcare, and learned to make some money to do make money with my time at home, and helped parents save some money.

  • Having children is a choice and a sacrifice that usually the woman has to make. So employers should be responsible for our lifestyle choices? And automatically get on board to spare the woman her earning potential?

  • Yes ladies you can have it all. You can dump your child in daycare, pay them all your wages and never see your child or stay home, make no money, lose your career and resent your child. So you can have it all, but it will cost you.

  • Getting your child into pre-school in NYC is nearly impossible. It’s more competitive than the college process. There’s small doc that touches on the subject. Nursery University

  • My husband and I are millennials and we have 4 young girls under 10. I have been a stay at home mom since my oldest was born. I went to college, I loved working and I had every intention to return to work once my kids went back to school. But now “Summer Childcare” for 3 months for 4 kids would be more per month then I made when working. ALSO my job didn’t offer enough PTO. Between Summers off, sick days, snow days, Holiday breaks, we didn’t have childcare for those days.
    I tho have zero regrets being home because I love it. I do however want my girls to have the option to follow their dreams rather that be careers and or motherhood. My husband makes a good income. Being home is a huge privilege for me (and my husband admits for him too as it allowed him to pursue all job opportunities and not have to worry about childcare)
    We also recognize that many parents today don’t have the option to have a parent home so there needs to be better and more affordable options for parents.

    I live in SE Michigan and our local school run daycare in our district is 1200-1400 bucks a month for a toddler. Around 1000 for Pre-K aged kiddo.

  • Wow I am glad NZ has subsidies for childcare. Some income related, some not. Was paying about $200 NZD a week after subsidies for good/average childcare fulltime ( included food + nappies ).

  • I think the pay and job security should be the one who decides who stays home…. who earns more and will provide more… better life

  • @ 6:46 Well that’s pretty baller, and they just rereleased all (10?) of the HP / Fantastic Beasts movies in 4k. Dunno if a 2yo will sit through that, but yeah!

  • The importance of removing dad from the childs life as a condition of the counties gorging their fat beaucratic budgets by theft and use of fraudulent income with holding

  • Anyone else like the little sociopath kid at the end pushing his friend down? It’s a long way to the top and that kid is going places. haha