With regards to Managing Discomfort after Surgery, Women Desire a Choice

 

Beyond Opioids: Transforming Pain Management to Improve Health

Video taken from the channel: American Physical Therapy Association


 

After Surgery Care and Pain Management | St Mary Medical Center

Video taken from the channel: St. Mary Medical Center


 

Enhanced recovery after surgery: Role of pain management

httpv://youtu.be/ZqC-6M5I_k?rel=0&modestbranding=1

Video taken from the channel: Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES)


 

Managing pain after hip or knee replacement

Video taken from the channel: Sunnybrook Hospital


 

Are OTC pain medications too minimal for managing pain after surgery?

Video taken from the channel: StoneSprings Hospital Center


 

Physician versus patient-directed pain management after surgery Brendan Carvalho, MD

Video taken from the channel: Stanford Medicine X


 

Endometriosis: Evaluation & Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain

Video taken from the channel: Celebration Health


According to a recent HealthyWomen survey, 99 percent of women want a choice in how their pain is managed after surgery, with 94 percent of women saying if they could effectively manage their pain without narcotics —also known as opioids and prescription painkillers—they would. According to a recent HealthyWomen survey, 99 percent of women want a choice in how their pain is managed after surgery, with 94 percent of women saying if they could effectively manage their pain without narcotics —also known as opioids and prescription painkillers—they would. And yet, 80 percent of the women surveyed still used.

Pain management options. Many surgeons and hospitals now use a “multimodal approach” to pain management to reduce the total exposure to any one product, especially narcotics. This means that you may receive more than one type of pain treatment, depending on your needs and the type of surgery you are having, to control pain in different ways. Pain medications. The key to effective pain management is to use a combination of methods. “If you are having surgery on a lower extremity, elevate it after the procedure.

This can help substantially with pain relief, swelling, and wound healing,” says Dr. Chiodo. Icing the area can also help in the first 24 to 48 hours after surgery.

Continued. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like: Celecoxib (Celebrex) Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) Naproxen sodium (Aleve) These drugs you take by mouth can ease swelling and pain, but. Managing anxiety and depression after surgery, whether with medication or social support often reduces the need for pain medication, Fraifeld says, and is. “Giving nonopioid pain medications before may help prevent the cascade of pain-causing chemicals that comes from your central nervous system after surgery,” explains Memtsoudis. Apply heat or ice, if recommended.

Your surgeon will tell you if this is recommended after the kind of surgery you had. Heat helps decrease pain and muscle spasms. Apply heat for 20 to 30 minutes every 2 hours for as directed. Whether your surgery is a medical necessity or choice, it’s important to have an educated discussion with your doctor about how to manage pain after your procedure. These conversations are especially critical in light of new research that proves women are more likely than men to become persistent opioid users following surgery.

Pain control following surgery is a priority for both you and your doctors. This document helps you understand pain management options, describes how to help your doctors and nurses control your pain, and to empower you to take an active role in making choices about pain treatment after discharge from the hospital. Appointments 216.444.7246.

List of related literature:

Some women will want to know their options regarding pain management and will choose to wait and see how labor progresses before selecting a specific method of analgesia or anesthesia.

“All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health” by Pamela L. Swearingen
from All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health
by Pamela L. Swearingen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

For some women, a hospital will be chosen because she expects that she will need pharmacological pain relief.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

This issue seemed to be more the woman’s desire to exercise control over the process of childbirth than merely to eliminate pain.

“The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine” by Eric J. Cassell Clinical Professor of Public Health Cornell University Medical College
from The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine
by Eric J. Cassell Clinical Professor of Public Health Cornell University Medical College
Oxford University Press, USA, 1991

Pain Management Following birth, women need to be assessed for pain, and most women require some pain-relief measures.

“Leifer's Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book” by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
from Leifer’s Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book
by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Women require effective opiate pain control following this procedure, but once pain is controlled they can be discharged.

“Alexander's Nursing Practice E-Book: Hospital and Home The Adult” by Chris Brooker, Maggie Nicol, Margaret F. Alexander
from Alexander’s Nursing Practice E-Book: Hospital and Home The Adult
by Chris Brooker, Maggie Nicol, Margaret F. Alexander
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

This system provides the woman with a sense of control over her own pain management and active participation in the childbirth process.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Women should have pain relief if they need it (Chiarelli & Cockburn, 1999), and all new mothers need support.

“Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series” by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
from Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series
by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2012

Women expect to have choices and a degree of control during childbirth, and their caregivers should provide analgesic options for them to choose from, including nonpharmacologic methods.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The problem is to balance the reduction of pain and discomfort to the woman associated with the cessation of menstruation and the risk of child bearing against the risk of mortality and complications arising from the performance of the procedure and its cost.

“Health Care and Public Policy: An Australian Analysis” by George R. Palmer, Stephanie D. Short
from Health Care and Public Policy: An Australian Analysis
by George R. Palmer, Stephanie D. Short
Macmillan Education Australia, 2000

Although seldom curative, surgery improves fertility and offers at least temporary pain relief.

“Anesthesiologist's Manual of Surgical Procedures” by Richard A. Jaffe
from Anesthesiologist’s Manual of Surgical Procedures
by Richard A. Jaffe
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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16 comments

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  • I had left hip replaced at 10:00am and they wanted me up and walking by 6:00pm. I was still in a lot of pain and doctor was in room and i cussed him out because i told him i was very sensitive to pain. Had to stay an extra day because they could not manage my pain.

  • Hey There! Thank you for this useful video. By the way, I hear many people keep on talking about Endometorax Remedy (search on google), but I’m not sure if it’s good. Have you thought about home remedy called Endometorax Remedy? I’ve heard many awesome things about it and my work buddy completely cure her endometriosis naturally with this remedy.

  • Interesting video, but sadly did not address the issues I had of not being able to take narcotic meds and anti inflammatory. For me, and I don t speak for all those that can t take those meds, my after surgery recovery has been one step from Hell.

  • Just had kneecap replacement at wrightington hospital x. So very painful x. Three days post op today x. Was having a lot of sickness due to the meds x. Couldn’t tolerate anything and trying to get on top of the pain was a real challenge cause you need to start moving it sooner rather than later x

  • had my left knee replaced when i was 38(now 49, right knee 41). the nurse, “your only 38”?!? i said yeah, i think im young for this too. man, u wanna talk about pain. but like most things, time heals

  • I’ve had four ‘total joint placements’ which took up all of 2017 (shoulders), all of 2018 plus all of 2019 and now here I am in 2020. I have never had extreme pain though, enough pain to keep me from sleeping well (I know misery)!  I’ve never pushed the allowed limits of my prescribed opioids and, have finally been taken off of them.  I am now taking TRAMADOL because of an occasional deep throbbing pain in my hamstring area when I sit too long or after a day of walking too much. I have told my surgeon that without these pain meds, I can not sleep well (I dream of dark room and bed sheets in a restless, fitful state of confusion)! Sometimes I can not fall asleep! ** My shoulders are great and, I am in outpatient rehab for my knees. Tramadol is helping me sleep.   Your video is great and the most informative I have found yet. Thank you!

  • Terrible Hospital. Was brought to their ER in extreme pain to the point of blacking out. Their implied I was a drug addict and refused any treatment or assistance. Was taken to another hospital that evaluated me and admitted me for treatment. Saint Marys is terrible hospital. I wouldn’t take anyone there.

  • My pain management problem is due to the fact that my doctor and my therapist have completely opposite views on the role of pain during therapy. My therapist’s attitude is “no pain, no gain” so my sessions are extremely painful. My doctor says that no therapy should be done to the point of pain. Since at 6 weeks, he wants to begin weaning me off opioids, the dosage has been reduced to half. Since it has only been 3 days, I’m not sure what is going to happen at my next physical therapy session. I. Don’t think that anyone who has not experienced the kind of pain we have had to endure can be truly empathetic. The experience is not only physical but since it lasts for weeks, it has an affect on one’s psychological well-being.

  • I’m hoping to get my First Total knee replacement surgery hopefully in February can you please tell me if I will be able to keep taking my two types of Morphine tablets and oral LOL YVONNE UK

  • My mother had knee replacement surgery one month ago. Now she has unbearable pain left side of knee but doctor saying it’s muscle pain.. It ll be OK after some time.

    I need you advise, please help.

  • Having the procedure done on June 4th, 2020. Had 3 previous scopes to repair torn meniscus’s due to martial arts for over 30 years. Previous surgeries include a TRSR (Total Reverse Shoulder Replacement) back in 2012, Left elbow ORIF, spinal fusion of L4-L5, partial right hip replacement in 2018. I agree that the sooner I return home produces a better outcome. We agreed, surgeon and myself, that an overstay for 1 night at the hospital, but if I feel like it, I’d rather go home the same day. I currently live in a mobile home so a walker would be a challenge, I’d rather try to get away with just a cane. I’ll have a CPM (Continuous Passive Motion) device along with an Aircast Motorized cooling machine. Pain management is 10mg of Percocet every 4 hours with the addition of Tylenol & Advil as adjunct therapy.

  • I am 1week in from total knee replacement. Just a little thing that really helped me was using a robe belt I put it under my foot and use it like a pulley. It helps a lot in lifting the leg up into bed or getting in a car. Good luck to all.

  • It’s been almost 2 months since my total knee replacement and I’m still have severe pain, how long will this pain last? I want it to go away, I want to walk like before I had it done, I want to bend it like before, but mostly the pain to go away. Can you tell me how long I will be in pain? I’m suppose to have my other knee done but I’m scared cause with this one I stopped breathing and they had to put me on life support. Please help

  • My husband recently had total hip replacement at St.Mary’s. Now they are scheduling him for a total knee replacement. My question is, where can I find him the “I love this joint” t-shirts?? He would LOVE one! Point me in the right direction? By the way, great video, great job all!

  • Make sure you do your physio..the harder you work at it the better your results. Always take your pain medicine an hour before your work out. Try to do more than what is expected……but don’t over do it.

  • Great video. I am having my knee replaced next month in Ottawa, Ontario. Your video has helped me understand what to expect before and after surgery.
    Thanks
    Andy