Winter Safety Strategies for Seniors

 

WINTER SAFETY FOR SENIORS: Snow Day Safety Tips

Video taken from the channel: Senior Safety Advice


 

Winter Safety Tips for Seniors

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5 Winter Safety Tips for Seniors

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Winter Safety Tips for Seniors

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TRIAD Offers Winter Safety Driving Tips For Seniors

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Winter tips for seniors

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Home Heating Safety Tips for Older Adults

Video taken from the channel: Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI)


Get into a warm room as soon as possible. Unless absolutely necessary, do not walk on frostbitten feet or toes—this increases the damage. Immerse the affected area in warm—not hot—water. Or, warm the affected area using body heat. For example, the heat of an armpit can be used to warm frostbitten.

Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults Stay warm indoors. Hypothermia occurs when the body’s core temperature dips below 95 degrees Fahrenheit, and it isn’t Staying warm outdoors. Even when the sun is shining brightly, cold air can be dangerous, leading to hypothermia and Snow removal safety. Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults Baby, It’s Cold Outside!

When the temperature drops, older adults run a higher risk of health problems and injuries related to the weather, including hypothermia, frostbite, and falls in ice and snow. What to do after you call 9-1-1: Try to move the person to a warmer place. Wrap the person in a warm blanket, towels, or coats—whatever is handy.

Even your own body warmth will help. Lie close, Give the person something warm to drink, but avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine, such as regular. Winter Safety Tips for Seniors Now that cold weather is knocking on the door, it’s time to ensure seniors in your life stay safe and warm all winter long.

These cold weather tips for seniors should go a long way in doing just that. Stay covered up when outside: Frostbite can happen quickly, so be sure all skin is covered completely when outside. Check these things off of your list to help ensure the safety and wellness of older adults this fall. In cooler regions, it’s not unusual to get a preview of the cold, snowy and icy winter weather during the autumn months.

Be sure to make shovels, car brushes and salt accessible in the event of an early storm. Ward off seasonal illnesses.*. Older adults should talk to their doctor about healthy lifestyle changes and vaccines that can help.

Joint pain: Joint pain can be more common for seniors in cold conditions – whether they suffer from arthritis or not. Hot water bottles. Use warm, but not boiling water to fill your hot water bottle and examine it for leaks before you use it. Replace it as soon as it starts to look cracked or worn or every two years. Remember that the rubber can perish from the inside so you may not be able to see if it’s worn out.

Falls, burns, and poisonings are among the most common accidents involving older people. Older adults who live alone may also become the victims of criminals who target older people. If you’re an older adult living on your own, or care for an older person living alone, here’s what you need to do to stay safe. Older people don’t always need help, but most people like someone to talk to. So make sure you take the time to call them, or drop in for a cup of tea and a chat.

The important thing is just to be there and to listen. Winter can be a depressing time for lots of peopl.

List of related literature:

Many of the safety recommendations for older adults are similar to those for younger people: use lap and shoulder belts in motor vehicles, avoid driving while intoxicated, use smoke detectors in the home, maintain hot water heaters at or below 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

“Gerontological Nursing: Competencies for Care” by Kristen L. Mauk
from Gerontological Nursing: Competencies for Care
by Kristen L. Mauk
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2010

Winter storm preparedness is essential for anyone who drives a motor vehicle in snow country.

“Medicine for the Outdoors E-Book: The Essential Guide to Emergency Medical Procedures and First Aid” by Paul S. Auerbach
from Medicine for the Outdoors E-Book: The Essential Guide to Emergency Medical Procedures and First Aid
by Paul S. Auerbach
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

• Implement measures to prevent hyperthermia (e.g., avoid excessive clothing and bedding, limit length of time in direct sunlight in hot weather, wear a wide-brimmed hat when in direct sun, park your car or van in the shade in hot weather and open the doors to let the vehicle cool down before getting inside).

“Ulrich & Canale's Nursing Care Planning Guides E-Book” by Nancy Haugen, Sandra J. Galura
from Ulrich & Canale’s Nursing Care Planning Guides E-Book
by Nancy Haugen, Sandra J. Galura
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Don’t suspend wet clothing or other articles on or around the heater to dry as they could catch fire.

“When All Hell Breaks Loose: Stuff You Need to Survive When Disaster Strikes” by Cody Lundin
from When All Hell Breaks Loose: Stuff You Need to Survive When Disaster Strikes
by Cody Lundin
Gibbs Smith, 2007

If you have to get out of the vehicle, put on additional windproof clothing and snow goggles, and tie a lifeline to yourself and the door handle before moving away from the vehicle.

“Wilderness Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features” by Paul S. Auerbach
from Wilderness Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features
by Paul S. Auerbach
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Injury prevention: Lap-shoulder seat belts Helmet use Fall prevention Smoke detector in home Safe storage of firearms Hot water heater temperature <120°-130° F (49°-54° C) Substance abuse: Tobacco cessation Avoid alcohol and drug use while driving, swimming, boating, etc.

“Health Assessment for Nursing Practice E-Book” by Susan Fickertt Wilson, Jean Foret Giddens
from Health Assessment for Nursing Practice E-Book
by Susan Fickertt Wilson, Jean Foret Giddens
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

• Use goggles to protect from blowing snow, along with full head and hand protection.

“Field Guide to Wilderness Medicine E-Book” by Paul S. Auerbach, Benjamin B. Constance, Luanne Freer
from Field Guide to Wilderness Medicine E-Book
by Paul S. Auerbach, Benjamin B. Constance, Luanne Freer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Always wear protective clothing, especially strong leather gloves, and a hat (to prevent your hair from catching fire as the sparks shower) is a good idea.

“How to Restore Volkswagen Beetle” by Jim Tyler
from How to Restore Volkswagen Beetle
by Jim Tyler
Veloce Publishing, 2004

Always carry a pair of gloves or mittens in your pack so you can protect your hands from the cold.

“Survivor Kid: A Practical Guide to Wilderness Survival” by Denise Long
from Survivor Kid: A Practical Guide to Wilderness Survival
by Denise Long
Chicago Review Press, Incorporated, 2011

winter season and knowing how to react if stranded or lost on the road are the keys to safe winter driving.

“Public/Community Health and Nursing Practice: Caring for Populations” by Christine L Savage
from Public/Community Health and Nursing Practice: Caring for Populations
by Christine L Savage
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Thanks for these winter safety tips for seniors. For more information about keeping seniors safe in the winter, especially regarding the increased risk of hypothermia, this article is helpful: http://lifesathomecare.com/keeping-seniors-safe-winter-season/