Why Pets Are Actually Excellent Caregiving Buddies

 

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Pets as Caregiving Companions

Video taken from the channel: Guideposts


Pets can alleviate loneliness, lower blood pressure and stave off depression. Having a cat, dog or other small pet takes some effort. Carrying out tasks like grooming, cleaning or walking an animal can give people a sense of purpose—not to mention a reason to get out of the house for some low-impact exercise and some social interaction.

Pets as Caregiving Companions In this video, three people discuss the caregiving role their pets played in their households. Read Edwina, Donna and Monica’s inspiring stories of pet caregivers from the August 2019 issue of Guideposts!Why older cats make great companions: 1. When a senior cat is adopted, they seem to truly understand the meaning of being rescued and are very thankful for the second chance. 2. Senior kitties already have their CAT-tastic purrsonalities, you’ll know if.

The therapeutic use of pets as companions is also becoming more common. Known as pet therapy or animal-assisted therapy (AAT), relationships with animals are encouraged and integrated into the care plan. When ownership is not possible, service companies and volunteer organizations bring animals to the seniors on a regular basis. According to the CDC, owning an animal can,“increase opportunities to exercise, get outside, and socialize.

Regular walking or playing with pets can decrease blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and. The fact is, companion animals of all kinds – dogs, cats, even rabbits and hamsters – enrich our lives. Research shows that pet owners have less illness, recover faster from serious health conditions, and tend to be more content than people who do not own pets. Cats have been known to help with loneliness, anxiety, depression, and more, just like dogs.

If you’re looking for a pet that requires a little less attention, a cat might be your best bet. They still make for great companions, but they’re also okay with being alone for a. 8. They make you chat to people. Any dog owner will know that walking your pet is a sure fire way to start conversations with fellow animal lovers. Ferrets are a lot like cats: independent, curious and mischievous.

However, they make great pets, as they’re highly energetic and intelligent. Children especially love ferrets, and if trained properly, they can be the loyal and low-maintenance companion you desire. 10 Reasons Fish Make Great Pets 1. Fish are known to have a tranquil, calming effect on anyone who watches them glide serenely through the water.

2.

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Claims are made that pets ease loneliness, improve family relationships, provide playmates for children, provide security for singles, reduce blood pressure and anxiety levels, and combat depression and inactivity amongst the elderly.

“Reality TV: Audiences and Popular Factual Television” by Annette Hill
from Reality TV: Audiences and Popular Factual Television
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Within a family which shares one pet, each human family member may receive different types and degrees of benefits from the presence of the animal and incur different costs of pet ownership.

“Companion Animals and Us: Exploring the Relationships Between People and Pets” by Anthony L. Podberscek, Elizabeth S. Paul, James A. Serpell
from Companion Animals and Us: Exploring the Relationships Between People and Pets
by Anthony L. Podberscek, Elizabeth S. Paul, James A. Serpell
Cambridge University Press, 2005

In general, for companion, laboratory and 200 animals, human care-givers provide all their physiological needs; hence, the expression of luxury behaviours are more important.

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from Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals
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Anyone with a beloved pet knows the pleasure, relaxation, and joy animals can provide when we’re well and the unconditional comfort, companionship, and support they give when we’re ill.

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Companion animals often provide significant benefits: friendship, unconditional love, physical activity, and social contact.

“The Global Guide to Animal Protection” by Andrew Linzey, Archbishop Desmond Tutu
from The Global Guide to Animal Protection
by Andrew Linzey, Archbishop Desmond Tutu
University of Illinois Press, 2013

Loving care for companion animals can also promote positive virtues such as friendship in the human world.

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In addition to the altruistic reason of bettering the lives of pets and owners, there are also solid economic reasons for embracing these concepts.

“Behavior Problems of the Dog and Cat E-Book” by Gary Landsberg, Wayne Hunthausen, Lowell Ackerman
from Behavior Problems of the Dog and Cat E-Book
by Gary Landsberg, Wayne Hunthausen, Lowell Ackerman
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Private ownership of many pets (or, if one must, “companions”) gives them access to food and shelter (and sometimes clothing) which creates long lives of ease and comfort.

“Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions” by Cass R. Sunstein, Martha C. Nussbaum
from Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions
by Cass R. Sunstein, Martha C. Nussbaum
Oxford University Press, 2004

The main reason people seek the company of pets must be psychological: animals make people happy and satisfy a basic urge to tend, to love, to bond.

“Run, Spot, Run: The Ethics of Keeping Pets” by Jessica Pierce
from Run, Spot, Run: The Ethics of Keeping Pets
by Jessica Pierce
University of Chicago Press, 2016

Having a pet fosters sensitivity and responsibility, and it provides companionship.

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from Encyclopedia of Human Relationships: Vol. 1-
by Harry T. Reis, Susan Sprecher
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Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • Thanks for this nice evaluation of cats as pets for seniors. I’m 90 years old, and I enjoy being my cat’s human. She’s a Maine Coon, and has an affectionate nature, as well as being very intelligent and quite funny. I live alone, and I think the value of having something around that makes me laugh aloud every day is a good thing. I agree, though, that as comical and adorable as they are, kittens are not a good choice for an older person. Visit the animal shelters. There are plenty of older cats that would make lovely companions. Calmer, but still active and playful.
    Another thing to be considered is the length of the cat’s fur. Medium and long fur and a soft undercoat tend to mat if not brushed frequently, and mats can be painful for the cat, and may require a trip to the groomer. Fortunately my cat loves to be brushed, and I enjoy brushing her, so it’s not a problem, but it is something to think about when choosing a cat for a senior.

  • thank you. Caring for a dementia patient…oh boy!.cook I nice meal and it’s not eaten or as appreciated.
    best to remain loving no matter what outer covers do.Mind as the machine it is has overtaken heart. Soul shrunk as result…yes it is challenging.