Why Kids with Autism Is Deserving Of More Exercise

 

Autism in Children: Exercises to Calm the Body & Improve Coordination

Video taken from the channel: National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD)


 

Autism & Fitness

Video taken from the channel: LivingHealthyChicago


 

Researching the benefits of exercise for children with autism

Video taken from the channel: FOX 47 News


 

Autism Exercise Tips Part #1

Video taken from the channel: SAAAC Autism Centre


 

Motivating Children with Autism to Exercise

Video taken from the channel: National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD)


 

Improve Muscle Tone in Children with Autism

Video taken from the channel: National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD)


 

Children with Autism can use Exercise as a Sensory Break

Video taken from the channel: National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD)


Further research is required to find out why children with autism, a brain-based disorder, tend to be more inactive, said MacDonald. She suggested it may be because they’re less likely to be involved in organized sports or physical education activities. “They can do it. Those abilities are there.

You also benefit your mental health. Your brain releases endorphins, which help fight against stress and depression. You just overall tend to feel better when you are active! It can be particularly important for children with autism to exercise, even helping to. 1) Have the child eat wholesome, organic food, reduce the amount of sugar in the diet 2) Reduce the time a child can spend at computer/tablet/phone and/or games console.

The pixelations act to overstimulate. ASD children are much more sensitive to the effects of such over stimulation. 3) Get the child to exercise!

Needless to say, education in this arena is sorely needed. 11 reasons children with autism are extra vulnerable to screen time effects and tech addiction. 1. Children with autism tend to have low.

Editor’s note: The following information is not meant to diagnose or treat and should not take the place of personal consultation, as appropriate, with a qualified healthcare professional and/or behavioral therapist. This is a great question. Many times, the behaviors of children with autism don’t make sense on the surface. Autism and gastrointestinal problems go hand-in-hand for many kids. This meta-analysis of several studies published in the Journal of Pediatrics estimates that “the odds of GI symptoms in children with ASD are four times more prevalent than for children without ASD.” The analysis indicated higher levels of GI symptoms in all four areas including general GI concerns, diarrhea, constipation.

When kids are active, their brain develops, allowing for new types of activity. Play-based activity that requires a high degree of sensory input (sight, sound, touch, etc.) helps develop a broad array of skills that make physical activity more enjoyable later in life. Children born prematurely also are at increased risk of autism, and more premature infants survive now than ever before. This article is reproduced with permission from Spectrum. When we statistically controlled for children’s age, race, sex and state of residence, we found that children with autism were 2.4 times more likely, and children with intellectual disability 1.9 times more likely, to enter foster care than typical children 2. Children with autism sometimes have motor coordination issues that need to be addressed.

There are two main types of motor functions: gross and fine. Gross motor skills involve big body movements.

List of related literature:

Many kids on the autism spectrum benefit from “heavy work” where they need to move their muscles against resistance for signals to reach their brain.

“1001 Great Ideas for Teaching and Raising Children with Autism Or Asperger's” by Ellen Notbohm, Veronica Zysk
from 1001 Great Ideas for Teaching and Raising Children with Autism Or Asperger’s
by Ellen Notbohm, Veronica Zysk
Future Horizons, Incorporated, 2010

Lang et al. (2010) reported that among children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 61% of studies included jogging or running, followed by swimming-water aerobics, bike-riding, weight training, and roller skating.

“Handbook of Evidence-Based Practices in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities” by Nirbhay N. Singh
from Handbook of Evidence-Based Practices in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
by Nirbhay N. Singh
Springer International Publishing, 2016

In a follow-up study with three children with autism, one of whom was age 7 (and two who were 9), it was shown that mild exercise (e.g., playing ball) had virtually no impact on self-stimulatory behavior (Kern et al., 1984), but positive benefits were replicated in conditions of vigorous physical exercise.

“Educating Children with Autism” by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Committee on Educational Interventions for Children with Autism, James P. McGee, Catherine Lord
from Educating Children with Autism
by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2001

Vigorous, aerobic exercise versus general motor training activities: Effects on maladaptive and stereotypic behaviors of adults with both autism and mental retardation.

“International Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders” by Johnny L. Matson, Peter Sturmey
from International Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders
by Johnny L. Matson, Peter Sturmey
Springer New York, 2011

Pediatrics 125:e17– e23, 2010 19948568 Elliott ROJr, Dobbin AR, Rose GD, et al: Vigorous, aerobic exercise versus general motor training activities: effects on maladaptive and stereotypic behaviors of adults with both autism and mental retardation.

“Lifestyle Psychiatry” by Douglas L. Noordsy, M.D.
from Lifestyle Psychiatry
by Douglas L. Noordsy, M.D.
American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2019

Physical activity in children and adolescents with autism assessed by triaxial accelerometry.

“Handbook of Special Education” by James M. Kauffman, Daniel P. Hallahan, Paige Cullen Pullen
from Handbook of Special Education
by James M. Kauffman, Daniel P. Hallahan, Paige Cullen Pullen
Taylor & Francis, 2017

The child should be made to feel comfortable and relaxed, which will improve exercise performance.

“Anderson’s Pediatric Cardiology E-Book” by Gil Wernovsky, Robert H. Anderson, Kumar Krishna, Kathleen A. Mussato, Andrew Redington, James S. Tweddell, Justin Tretter
from Anderson’s Pediatric Cardiology E-Book
by Gil Wernovsky, Robert H. Anderson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Some exercise interventions focus on autism-specific impairments such as stereotypical repetitive behaviors, whereas others focus on perceptual-motor skills or academics.

“Neurologic Interventions for Physical TherapyE-Book” by Suzanne Tink Martin, Mary Kessler
from Neurologic Interventions for Physical TherapyE-Book
by Suzanne Tink Martin, Mary Kessler
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Choosing an appropriate physical exercise to reduce stereotypic behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders: A non-randomized crossover study.

“Handbook of Intellectual Disabilities: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice” by Johnny L. Matson
from Handbook of Intellectual Disabilities: Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice
by Johnny L. Matson
Springer International Publishing, 2019

With regard to participation in community activities, available evidence from the literature suggests that children with ASD participate in activities less frequently and with less variety compared to children with other developmental disabilities as well as those who are developing normally (LaVesser & Berg, 2011).

“Handbook of Assessment and Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder” by Johnny L. Matson
from Handbook of Assessment and Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder
by Johnny L. Matson
Springer International Publishing, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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8 comments

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  • This made me SO HAPPY!!!! ��
    Amazing job, both of you!
    So funny and uplifting!
    I listen to my favourite books when I exercise too!
    Or watch my favourite movies.
    I laughed many times because I see so much of myself in him, when he corrected you!

    You guys are awesome, thank you for the 6.46 minutes of pure motivation! ☺��

  • there is an exercise which forces you to use just the left then just the right brain, you could where a patch on one eye and use the opposite hand, would force left brain to send signal to right brain to tell it what left hand is doing

  • It is very good. I had JRA childhood arthritis when I was little. So it is good to do it since I had that for a long time. Been in remission since I was 11 and now it is 30+ now.

  • This is awesome. I have a 23 year old sister who is at the lower-end of the autism spectrum, so minimal fine motor skills and little-to-no verbal communication skills aside from what could be considered “babble” and one-syllable words like “yes” and “no”. I, myself, am in love with fitness and I think every person can be positively affected by it, even those individuals with disabilities. I admire and respect Coach Dave immensely for the impact he’s making on Anthony, and in the lives of other people I’m sure. I’m fascinated by the autism spectrum, and am a fitness-addict so this video is the best of both worlds for me. Thank you for posting it! 

  • I follow your videos for my son with autism age 10, he has apraxia and low muscle tone and is non verbal. I tend to push harder and he loses his motivation when I get pushy.. I got to remember to keep it light and silly.

  • My brothers and I own several taekwondo schools and recently we have been registering more kids with.advanced autism. This is GREAT!! we keep learning and a lot of our exercises help but this would be great to do at our schools! Would it be ok for is to apply your drills?? Thank you!!

  • or u can just make a board, a base 12 inches square, then put a divider on it 12 inches to go down center of the base and 18 inches tall, with foam on front, y0u put 60 dots on the left of base and 60 on the right, then with nose on foam, touch all the dots on the left, then on the right, do 3 times

  • Thank you! I will be using for my daughter. I just subscribed to your channel. Keep up the good work, it’s important to our Autistic persons all over the World.