When It Is Here we are at Insulin Understanding Your Choices

 

Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: Endocrine Research Society


 

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: British Heart Foundation


 

The Most Effective Time to Take Mealtime Insulin

Video taken from the channel: Taking Control Of Your Diabetes


 

t:slim G4 Insulin Pump Training Video #7: Setting Continuous Glucose Monitoring Alerts

Video taken from the channel: Tandem Diabetes


 

NCLEX Question! What does Peak Mean?

Video taken from the channel: EmpoweRN


 

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Test Results

Video taken from the channel: Endocrine Research Society


 

Insulin Questions: How will I find the time?

Video taken from the channel: Diabetes Canada


Insulin is often required in people with type 2 diabetes. Over time, insulin-producing beta cells in your pancreas simply wear out. The less insulin your own body produces, the more insulin you need to take. Several types of insulin are available. Which type you use and how often you take it depends entirely on you and your blood sugar levels.

When It’s Time for Insulin: Understanding Your Options from the Diabetes Health Center. Your doctor has decided to start you on insulin because the oral medications you’ve been taking are not effective in managing your blood sugars.Ideally, you should have an A1C level (a marker of blood sugar levels over the past 90 days) of less than 7 percent. Intermediate-acting insulin generally reaches the bloodstream about 2 to 4 hours after injection, peaks 4 to 12 hours later, and is effective for about 12 to 18 hours. Types: NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N, ReliOn) Long-acting insulin reaches the bloodstream several hours after injection and tends to lower glucose levels up to 24 hours. Insulin shots are most effective when you take them so that insulin goes to work when glucose from your food starts to enter your blood.

For example, regular insulin works best if you take it 30 minutes before you eat. Too much insulin or not enough? High morning.

Sometimes, particularly if diabetes is diagnosed a decade or more after its onset, the beta cells are too far gone to salvage, and you may need to take insulin permanently. Close Share options. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your.

Natural insulin (i.e. insulin released from your pancreas) keeps your blood sugar in a very narrow range. Overnight and between meals, the normal, non-diabetic blood sugar ranges between 60-100mg/dl and 140 mg/dl or less after meals and snacks. Many types of insulin are available and they vary by: How long they take to begin working (onset) When they reach their maximum effect (peak) How long they last. Your doctor may prescribe a mixture of insulin types to use throughout the day and night.

If you need insulin, your doctor will recommend a specific type depending on your lifestyle, the type of diabetes you have, and your blood sugar levels at different times of the day. You may need more insulin coverage at mealtimes, overnight, or throughout the entire day. The general types of insulin therapy include: Long-, ultralongor intermediate-acting insulin.

When you’re not eating, your liver releases glucose so the body continually has energy. Long, ultra-long or intermediate-acting insulin helps the body use this.

List of related literature:

(D) A more intensive regimen provides insulin as a ‘basal’ dose at bedtime, lasting the full 24h, and short-acting insulin with every meal, for a total of four doses per day.

“Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition” by Benjamin Caballero, Lindsay Allen, Andrew Prentice
from Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition
by Benjamin Caballero, Lindsay Allen, Andrew Prentice
Elsevier Science, 2005

Persistence of episodes necessitates consideration of switching from a standard shortacting preparation to a rapid-acting insulin such as insulin lispro, which might help to better match insulin administration with intake of food.

“Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of the Adult Patient” by Allan H. Goroll, Albert G. Mulley
from Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of the Adult Patient
by Allan H. Goroll, Albert G. Mulley
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Options 3 and 4 can be eliminated first using general medication guidelines, because insulin dosages and times should not be adjusted.

“Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-PN® Examination E-Book” by Linda Anne Silvestri
from Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-PN® Examination E-Book
by Linda Anne Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012
from the remaining options, recalling the complications associated with a continuous infusion of insulin will direct you to option 3.

“Saunders Q&A Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book” by Linda Anne Silvestri
from Saunders Q&A Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book
by Linda Anne Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

SC basal insulin must be given at least 2–4 hours prior to discontinuation of IV insulin therapy to prevent rebound hyperglycemia [89, 90].

“The Diabetes Textbook: Clinical Principles, Patient Management and Public Health Issues” by Joel Rodriguez-Saldana
from The Diabetes Textbook: Clinical Principles, Patient Management and Public Health Issues
by Joel Rodriguez-Saldana
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Patients who experience difficult control of blood glucose levels may continue to cover elevated levels at mealtime on a sliding scale with bolus doses of shortacting insulin orders at home in addition to the longer-acting variety.

“Mulholland's The Nurse, The Math, The Meds E-Book: Drug Calculations Using Dimensional Analysis” by Susan Turner
from Mulholland’s The Nurse, The Math, The Meds E-Book: Drug Calculations Using Dimensional Analysis
by Susan Turner
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

• When administering insulin IV, use only regular insulin (as recommended by the 2013 CDA CPG).

“Calculate with Confidence, Canadian Edition E-Book” by Deborah C. Gray Morris, Marcia Brown
from Calculate with Confidence, Canadian Edition E-Book
by Deborah C. Gray Morris, Marcia Brown
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

The basal insulin is a long-acting insulin (insulin glargine) administered constantly to keep the blood glucose from fluctuating due to the normal release of glucose from the liver.

“Pharmacology and the Nursing Process E-Book” by Linda Lane Lilley, Shelly Rainforth Collins, Julie S. Snyder
from Pharmacology and the Nursing Process E-Book
by Linda Lane Lilley, Shelly Rainforth Collins, Julie S. Snyder
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Taking the split-mix regimen and then dividing the evening insulin dose—delivering lispro/regular insulin before supper and the intermediate-acting insulin at bedtime—can afford a significant reduction in the risk of nighttime hypoglycemia.”

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, D.M. Phillips, J.E. Scherger, Robert Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, et. al.
Springer New York, 2002

They can also help the patient change to long-acting insulin, such as Glargine, as basal insulin with short-acting insulin analogs to manage pre-prandial boluses of insulin and episodes of hyperglycemia.

“The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual E-Book” by Christopher A. Sanford, Elaine C. Jong
from The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual E-Book
by Christopher A. Sanford, Elaine C. Jong
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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7 comments

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  • Hi! I’ve been watching your videos for a while. I’m taking my exam in a week. Any last tips or videos I should watch before then? Thanks for everything! Here’s my email: [email protected]

  • Thank you for all the questions! I have just gotten my NCLIX review book!!!! Oh I’m so excited like a kid in the candy store:) I did wanted to know if you used it a certain way to make it more usefull/approachable? Thank you
    Lana B.

  • “I am always doing that which I can not do, in other that I may learn how to do it.”
    Picasso
     Thank you for your videos!  You’re an inspiration of what all of us’ up and coming’ new nurses strive to become!

  • HI! you are pretty awesome! I love your videos, thanks for sharing your knowledge… I’m gonna take my nclex exam soon. can you send me more tips and infos? thanks! God speed!!! continue to be a blessing
    here’s my email: [email protected]

  • so far very helpful… Im comparing your videos to my textbook since my prof Stresses the textbook… exam is Friday and tips… its on Endocrine and its a midterm on respiratory and cardio.. yikes lol

  • Many thanks, I’ve been looking for “type 2 diabetes symptoms explained” for a while now, and I think this has helped. Have you ever come across Laniley Kansabella Magic (just google it )? Ive heard some extraordinary things about it and my brother in law got cool results with it.